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The Horseless Carriage.

American Government Special Collections Reference Desk

Pre-WWII Racing

The Horseless Carriage.

Pullman Herald (Pullman, Washington)
November 6, 1897


Next to the bicycle, the horseless carriage will, for short rides, be the mechanical conveyance of the greatest blessing to humanity, and the interest of the public in this vehicle will be so great that inventors and manufacturers will redouble their energies to make a conveyance that will fill this demand.

The horseless carriage which is to be the conveyance of the future must be sold at a more reduced price than the horseless carriage of to-day costs. When this time comes the advantages of such a mode of conveyance will be so many that the problem of traversing short distances will be satisfactorily solved. Inasmuch as one of the greatest manufacturing firms of the highest grade of bicycles the world over has recently reduced the price of its wheels very materially, we look with encouragement to this firm to be the one to produce the best horseless carriage and the lowest one in price, considering the material used and the skilled workmanship employed.

When the horseless carriage comes down in price it will become a necessity. At present a horse must be kept for bad weather by people who are unable, through weakness or poor health, to go about.

There are upward of 2,000 horseless carriages in use in Paris for public service, and private citizens can muster more than this number. Indeed, Europeans are much more familiar with them than Americans are. The horseless carriage is in very common use in Europe, although it is cumbersome and unwieldy. The general opinion is that since American genius has taken up the matter the horseless carriage will become a great success.

The horseless carriage has more advantages than appears at first sight. Of course there must be a place to keep it. The horse, the feed, the clearing up, the constant breakage of harness and the perpetual annoyance of feeling that one's animals are not half cared for will give place to the ease and comfort with which the horseless carriage can be kept. It will not be difficult to learn to manage these carriages, and when repair shops become frequent, the problem if getting about will be so simplified that everybody will wonder why we never had such a convenient vehicle before.

An expert in mechanics is the authority for the assertion that the horseless carriage will run a mucho the successful and rapid career, everything considered, than the bicycle.—New York Ledger.



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