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Four teenagers killed in car crash in Birmingham, England

American Government Special Collections Reference Desk

Four teenagers killed in car crash in Birmingham, England

Wikinews
November 14, 2009

Four teenage boys are dead after a car crash in Birmingham, England. The collision, which occurred at around 0345 GMT in the suburb of Moseley, involved four boys crashing a blue Rover into a wall on Salisbury Road. The ages of the adolescents are reported as 15, 16, and 17; the age of the fourth teenager is unconfirmed. All four died at the scene.

"Police can confirm three of the boys in the car were 17, 15 and 16 years old," the West Midlands Police said in a statement. "The age of the fourth boy is yet to be confirmed. All four occupants of the car died at the scene. A police car in the area at the time was flagged down by a member of the public, who heard the collision take place. Officers responded to the incident immediately."

The car itself is not believed to have been stolen. "Crews arrived to find a car which had been in a significant collision with a wall," a spokesperson for the West Midlands Ambulance Service said. "The four occupants of the car all suffered serious multiple injuries in the crash. Unfortunately nothing could be done to save the men and they were all confirmed dead at the scene."

This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.

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