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Automotive Fuel Ratings Certification and Posting




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American Government

Automotive Fuel Ratings Certification and Posting

Donald S. Clark
Federal Register
April 8, 2011

[Federal Register: April 8, 2011 (Volume 76, Number 68)]
[Rules and Regulations]               
[Page 19684-19692]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr08ap11-2]                         

=======================================================================
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FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION

16 CFR Part 306

 
Automotive Fuel Ratings Certification and Posting

AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission.

ACTION: Final rule.

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[[Page 19685]]

SUMMARY: The Commission issues final amendments to its Rule for 
Automotive Fuel Ratings, Certification and Posting (``Fuel Rating 
Rule'' or ``Rule'') by allowing an alternative octane rating method and 
making other miscellaneous revisions. The Commission declines to issue 
final ethanol labeling amendments at this time.

DATES: The amendments published in this document will become effective 
May 31, 2011. The incorporation by reference of certain publications 
listed in the rule is approved by the Director of the Federal Register 
as of May 31, 2011.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Matthew Wilshire, (202) 326-2976, 
Attorney, Division of Enforcement, Bureau of Consumer Protection, 
Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 
20580.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

I. Introduction

    In 2009, the Commission solicited comments on its Fuel Rating Rule 
as part of a systematic review of its rules and guides.\1\ In response 
to those comments, the Commission published a Notice of Proposed 
Rulemaking (``NPRM'') \2\ on March 16, 2010, proposing: (1) An 
alternative octane rating method; (2) new rating, certification, and 
labeling provisions for blends of gasoline with more than 10 percent 
ethanol (``ethanol fuels''); \3\ and (3) miscellaneous minor 
amendments. In addition, the Commission declined to revise the Rule's 
provisions regarding fuels containing biodiesel and biomass-based 
diesel (collectively, ``biodiesel fuels'').\4\
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    \1\ Federal Trade Commission: Automotive Fuel Ratings, 
Certification and Posting: Request for Public Comments, 74 FR 9054 
(Mar. 2, 2009) (``RPC'').
    \2\ Federal Trade Commission: Automotive Fuel Ratings, 
Certification and Posting: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 75 FR 
12470 (Mar. 16, 2010) (``NPRM'').
    \3\ The Rule already provides requirements for ethanol fuels 
with at least 70 percent concentration, E85. That fuel generally 
contains 85 percent ethanol mixed with 15 percent gasoline. 16 CFR 
306.0(i)(2)(ii).
    \4\ Biodiesel fuels include pure biodiesel and biomass-based 
diesel, as well as blends of those fuels with conventional diesel. 
Biodiesel is a diesel fuel produced by transforming animal fat or 
vegetable oil into automotive fuel. Biodiesel serves as a diesel 
substitute and is usually blended with diesel for sale at retail 
pumps. Biomass-based diesel is a larger category of diesel fuel 
substitutes produced from nonpetroleum renewable resources and that 
meet the registration requirements for fuels and fuel additives 
established by the Environmental Protection Agency. Biodiesel is a 
subset of biomass-based diesel. For further background on biodiesel 
fuels, see the Commission's announcement of amendments expanding the 
Rule to cover those fuels. Federal Trade Commission: Automotive Fuel 
Ratings, Certification and Posting: Final Rule on Biodiesel 
Labeling, 73 FR 40154 (Jul. 11, 2008) (``Biodiesel Fuel 
Rulemaking'').
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Commenters supported the proposed octane rating method, suggested 
allowing an additional octane rating method, objected to several 
aspects of the proposed ethanol labeling requirements, argued for 
revision of the Rule's biodiesel fuel provisions, and recommended 
further miscellaneous changes. Below, the Commission responds to those 
comments and announces final amendments that allow an alternative 
octane rating method.
    The final amendments do not address ethanol fuel labeling. Instead, 
the Commission will address this issue at a later date. As discussed 
below, commenters criticized the proposed labels, supporting different 
or additional disclosures to prevent misfueling. Moreover, after the 
comment period closed, the Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA'') 
issued a waiver pursuant to the Clean Air Act that allows use of 
ethanol-gasoline blends of up to 15 percent ethanol concentration 
(``E15'') in certain conventional vehicles, subject to EPA approval. In 
light of the comments and EPA's waiver decision, the Commission finds 
that more time is necessary to address this issue. The Commission, 
however, will not delay final rulemaking regarding the proposed 
alternate octane rating method and biodiesel fuels because announcing 
final decisions regarding both is in the public interest.
    This document first provides background on the Fuel Rating Rule, 
then discusses the comments submitted. Finally, it responds to those 
comments and describes the final amendments in detail.

II. Background

A. The Fuel Rating Rule

    The Commission first promulgated the Fuel Rating Rule, 16 CFR part 
306 (then titled the ``Octane Certification and Posting Rule''), in 
1979 in accordance with the Petroleum Marketing Practices Act 
(``PMPA''), 15 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.\5\ The Rule originally applied only 
to gasoline. In 1993, pursuant to amendments to PMPA, the Commission 
expanded the Rule to cover liquid alternative fuels.\6\ Currently, the 
Rule defines ``alternative liquid automotive fuels,'' as including, but 
not limited to, certain listed fuels. That list does not include 
ethanol fuels below 70 percent concentration (``Mid-Level Ethanol 
blends'').\7\ In 2008, the Commission again amended the Rule to 
incorporate specific labeling requirements for biodiesel fuels above 5 
percent concentration, as required by Section 205 of the Energy 
Independence and Security Act of 2007 (``EISA''), 42 U.S.C. 17021.\8\
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    \5\ Federal Trade Commission: Automotive Fuel Ratings, 
Certification and Posting: Final Rule, 44 FR 19160 (Mar. 30, 1979).
    \6\ Federal Trade Commission: Automotive Fuel Ratings, 
Certification and Posting: Final Rule, 58 FR 41356 (Aug. 3, 1993).
    \7\ 16 CFR 306.0(i)(2).
    \8\ Biodiesel Fuel Rulemaking, 73 FR 40154.
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    The Fuel Rating Rule designates methods for rating and certifying 
fuels, as well as posting the ratings at the point of sale. The Rule 
also requires refiners, importers, and producers of any liquid 
automotive fuel to determine that fuel's ``automotive fuel rating'' 
before transferring it to a distributor or retailer. For gasoline, 
covered entities must determine the octane rating by deriving research 
octane and motor octane numbers using ``ASTM International'' (``ASTM'') 
\9\ standards D2699 and D2700, respectively, and then averaging the 
results. For alternative fuels, except biodiesel fuels, the rating is 
the minimum percentage of the principal component of the fuel and a 
brief description of the fuel.\10\ In addition, any covered entity, 
including a distributor, that transfers a fuel must certify the fuel's 
rating to the transferee either by including it in papers accompanying 
the transfer or by letter. Finally, the Rule requires retailers to post 
the fuel rating by adhering a label to the retail fuel pump and 
provides precise specifications regarding the content, size, color, and 
font of the label.
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    \9\ ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society 
for Testing and Materials, develops international voluntary 
consensus standards for various products, including automotive fuel. 
See http://www.astm.org.
    \10\ The Rule requires rating biodiesel fuels by the percentage 
of biodiesel or biomass-based diesel in the fuel.
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B. Procedural History

    The Commission received 12 comments in response to its March 2, 
2009 Federal Register Notice.\11\ The comments generally supported the 
Rule but proposed several amendments, focusing on three key issues. 
First, commenters requested that the Commission allow gasoline octane 
rating using a method specified in ASTM D2885, ``Standard Test Method 
for Determination of Octane Number of Spark-Ignition Engine Fuels by 
On-Line Direct Comparison Technique'' (the ``On-

[[Page 19686]]

Line Method'').\12\ Second, several commenters supported new labeling 
requirements for Mid-Level Ethanol blends to prevent consumers from 
using those blends in their conventional cars, which would put their 
warranties at risk and could harm various vehicle components.\13\ 
Finally, commenters urged the Commission to change its biodiesel fuel 
provisions in two ways: (1) By requiring producers to rate biodiesel 
blends at or below 5 percent concentration; and (2) by exempting 
biomass-based diesel from the Rule.\14\
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    \11\ The comments in response to the March 2, 2009 Federal 
Register Notice are located at: http://www.ftc.gov/os/comments/
fuelratingreview/index.shtm.
    \12\ NPRM, 75 FR at 12472.
    \13\ Id. at 12471-72.
    \14\ Id. at 12472-73. Commenters also proposed several minor 
miscellaneous changes to the Rule.
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    On March 16, 2010, the Commission published an NPRM responding to 
the commenters' suggestions and proposing four substantive Rule 
amendments. First, to allow Mid-Level Ethanol blend labeling above 10 
percent and below 50 percent concentration, the proposed amendments 
would have required rating ethanol fuels by the amount of ethanol in 
the blend, rather than by the principal component of the fuel. Second, 
the proposed amendments would have required retailers to post labels 
disclosing a Mid-Level Ethanol blend's ethanol content by displaying a 
broad range of ``10 to 70 percent ethanol,'' a narrower range, or a 
specific percentage. Third, the proposed amendments would have required 
all ethanol fuel labels, including those for E85,\15\ to contain the 
additional disclosures ``may harm some vehicles'' and ``check owner's 
manual.'' In the NPRM, the Commission explained that ``[t]his 
additional information should assist consumers in identifying the 
proper fuel for their vehicles.'' \16\ Fourth, the proposed amendments 
would have allowed the On-Line Method. After reviewing ASTM D2885, the 
Commission agreed that the method yielded the same results as the 
method the Rule currently allows.\17\ Finally, the Commission proposed 
minor miscellaneous amendments, which included updating certain ASTM 
standard references, modifying the Rule language for clarification, and 
addressing some typographical errors.\18\
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    \15\ The Rule currently provides specific requirements for E85, 
a mix of gasoline and ethanol. Although that fuel generally contains 
85 percent ethanol, retailers may reduce the ethanol component to as 
little as 70 percent to allow proper starting and performance in 
colder climates.
    \16\ NPRM, 75 FR at 12474.
    \17\ Id. at 12474-75.
    \18\ Id. at 12475.
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    The Commission did not propose revising the Rule's biodiesel fuel 
provisions. The Commission explained that rating blends at or below 5 
percent would unnecessarily burden producers. Furthermore, the 
Commission noted, retailers that blended biodiesel could either test 
the resulting blend, or blend in a manner that would ensure that the 
fuel fell within one of the Rule's three biodiesel labeling categories, 
and, therefore, did not need rating information to comply with the 
Rule.\19\ With respect to biomass-based diesel, the Commission 
explained that, under EISA, it had no discretion to exempt any biomass-
based diesel from the Rule's labeling requirements.\20\
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    \19\ Id. The three labeling categories are: (1) From above 5 to 
no more than 20 percent; (2) above 20 percent to less than 100 
percent; and (3) 100 percent. 16 CFR 12(a)(4)-(9).
    \20\ NPRM, 75 FR at 12475.
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III. Comments in Response to the NPRM

    The Commission received 62 comments in response to the NPRM.\21\ As 
in the prior comment period, commenters focused on octane rating 
methods, ethanol labeling, and biodiesel fuel rating. They also 
proposed several minor miscellaneous changes to the Rule.
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    \21\ The comments are located at: http://www.ftc.gov/os/
comments/fuelratingnprm.
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A. Octane Rating

    The American Petroleum Institute (``API''), ConocoPhillips, 
Marathon Petroleum Company, LLC (``Marathon''), and the National 
Petrochemical & Refiners Association (``NPRA'') addressed the 
Commission's proposal to allow octane rating through the On-Line 
Method. All supported the proposal, though API and Marathon noted that 
the ASTM standards referenced in the proposed amendments are now 
outdated.\22\ To prevent this problem in the future, Marathon and NPRA 
suggested adopting ASTM D2885 without reference to a year.\23\
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    \22\ ConocoPhillips comment at 1; API comment at 7; Marathon 
comment at 2; NPRA comment at 2.
    \23\ Marathon comment at 2; NPRA comment at 2. The Tennessee 
Department of Agriculture generally supported adopting ASTM 
standards without reference to a year of publication. Tennessee 
Department of Agriculture comment at 3.
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    Tesoro, a manufacturer and marketer of petroleum products, 
suggested expanding the Rule's provisions to allow octane rating 
through infrared analyzers (``Infrared Method''), which Tesoro asserted 
``provide more reliable results.'' \24\ Tesoro argued that the Infrared 
Method provides more precise and accurate results, an ability to sample 
gasoline more efficiently, and reduced costs to industry.\25\ 
Specifically, Tesoro reported:
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    \24\ Tesoro comment at 1. Tesoro also submitted additional 
documents to Commission staff during the comment period, which are 
included in the record.
    \25\ Id. at 1-2.

    A recent interlaboratory study was conducted to demonstrate the 
accuracy and precision of infrared analyzers for octane. Based on 
the results of that study involving six laboratories, near infrared 
analyzers showed significantly better precision over ASTM D2699 and 
D2700 octane [methods].\26\
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    \26\ Id. at 2.

Tesoro further reported that, due in part to greater reliability, 
``[o]ver 25 states use infrared analyzers for screening fuel samples 
[to test octane levels] in the field as well as in the laboratory.'' 
\27\
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    \27\ Id. at 4.

    Tesoro also specifically addressed the enforcement issues 
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surrounding the Infrared Method:

    We also believe that in case of a discrepancy between the posted 
octane rating and the octane of the sample, ASTM D2699 and ASTM 
D2700 should continue to be used as the referee method. This 
approach, which is consistent with the enforcement approach used by 
State regulatory agencies, should not impose any additional 
enforcement burden on the Commission--since ASTM D2699 and ASTM 
D2700 would continue to be the referee method.\28\
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    \28\ Id. at 6.

As a mechanism for allowing the Infrared Method through an enforceable 
Rule provision, Tesoro recommended amending the Rule to allow the 
method only insofar as the method conforms to ASTM D6122, ``Standard 
Practice for Validation of the Performance of Multivariate Infrared 
Spectrophotometers,'' and is specifically correlated with the ASTM 
D2699 and D2700 methods.\29\ In addition, Tesoro submitted specific 
language to effect its proposed change.\30\
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    \29\ Id. at 7.
    \30\ Id. at 8. Petroleum industry members and representatives 
ConocoPhillips, Flint Hills Resources LP, Marathon, Suncor Energy 
USA, NPRA, and Valero Energy Corporation (``Valero'') also supported 
the Infrared Method. ConocoPhillips comment at 2; Flint Hills 
Resources comment; Marathon comment at 2; Suncor Energy USA comment; 
NPRA comment at 3; Valero comment at 1.
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    Several State regulators supported Tesoro's proposal. For example, 
the Washington State Department of Agriculture reported that it ``has 
used portable infrared octane analyzers successfully in the field to 
test octane levels on gasoline motor fuels for over 10 years'' and that 
it has ``found portable infrared analyzers to be an accurate and low 
cost tool in determining octane level compliance.'' \31\ Additionally, 
the

[[Page 19687]]

National Conference on Weights and Measures (``NCWM'') provided a 
survey showing that 17 of 24 regulatory agencies surveyed use the 
Infrared Method to determine if fuel dispensed at a pump has the same 
octane rating as posted on the label.\32\
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    \31\ Washington State Department of Agriculture comment; see 
also Massachusetts Division of Standards comment (supporting the 
Infrared Method); Nevada Department of Agriculture comment (same); 
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services 
comment (same).
    \32\ NCWM comment at 3-4.
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    Significantly, the Center for Auto Safety (``CAS''), a consumer 
group, also supported Tesoro's position. CAS explained that allowing 
the method would ease enforcement and, therefore, benefit consumers:

    Many States now use infrared analyzers to determine octane 
because they are cheaper, more accurate and permit greater number[s] 
of dispensing pump inspections per day than using octane engines. * 
* * Approving infrared analyzers calibrated to measure octane would 
allow greater levels of enforcement and increased quality control by 
refiners at lower cost.\33\
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    \33\ CAS comment at 2.
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B. Biodiesel Fuels

    Six commenters addressed the Rule's biodiesel fuel provisions. 
Generally, these commenters disagreed with the Commission's decision 
not to propose amendments to those provisions and urged 
reconsideration. The commenters supported rating biodiesel blends 
containing 5 percent or less biodiesel, exempting ``renewable diesel'' 
that qualifies as biomass-based diesel, and allowing a less precise 
content disclosure for biodiesel blends above 20 percent concentration.
    The Petroleum Marketers Association of America (``PMAA'') explained 
why it believed rating blends less than 5 percent concentration is 
necessary:

    Currently, distributors and retailers are receiving biodiesel 
blends from suppliers in which they have no idea of the actual 
biodiesel content. Therefore, it is impossible for these downstream 
parties to accurately notify consumers [of] the biodiesel content of 
the fuel they are offering for sale other than providing a possible 
blend range. * * * 97% of all retail gasoline stations are owned by 
petroleum marketers who are classified as small businesses under the 
U.S. Small Business Administration's size standards. Refiners, 
producers and distributors above the terminal rack are large 
businesses. * * * It would be entirely appropriate to shift this 
compliance burden to the large businesses who are not only more able 
to bear the burden but also in a better position to track and notify 
the amount of biodiesel they are adding to product upstream of the 
terminal rack.\34\
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    \34\ PMAA comment at 2.

Fuel producer ConocoPhillips similarly favored such rating, asserting 
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that it would alert all fuel recipients of the biodiesel content.\35\

    \35\ ConocoPhillips comment at 2. In addition, API favored 
requiring entities to rate biodiesel blends at 5 percent or less 
concentration, but suggested rating the fuel as simply containing 
biodiesel rather than an exact percentage rating. API comment at 7.
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    Although the comments that addressed the issue favored expanding 
the Rule's biodiesel requirements, they favored abolishing the Rule's 
requirements to rate, certify, and post renewable diesel, a type of 
biomass-based diesel.\36\ The commenters asserted that disclosing the 
presence of renewable diesel is unnecessary because, as Marathon 
stated, it ``can not be distinguished from'' petroleum diesel and 
``[t]here is no ASTM method to identify the volume of renewable diesel 
in a [blend].'' \37\ In addition, NPRA asserted that because pipelines 
do not segregate biomass-based diesel blends from conventional diesel, 
rating requirements ``would be disruptive to the distribution 
industry.'' \38\ Therefore, the commenters concluded, retailers cannot 
rate a biomass-based diesel blend, and rating is unnecessary.
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    \36\ Renewable diesel is a diesel fuel derived from organic 
material. The fuel's properties satisfy ASTM D975, the standard for 
conventional diesel fuel. See NPRM, 75 FR at 40155.
    \37\ Marathon comment at 3; see also Valero comment at 1; API 
comment at 9.
    \38\ NPRA comment at 2.
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    In addition, API asserted that it is unclear whether the relevant 
statute defines renewable diesel as biomass-based diesel. Specifically, 
it argued that whether a particular batch of renewable diesel met 
EISA's definition of biomass-based diesel depended on how a 
manufacturer processed it. Thus, according to API, the Rule would 
require different labeling for two different batches of the exact same 
fuel, an outcome API described as ``absurd.'' \39\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \39\ API comment at 9-10.
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    Finally, API suggested loosening the Rule's requirements for over 
20 percent concentration biodiesel blends. Specifically, it favored 
amending the Rule, which currently requires disclosure of the precise 
volume percentage, to allow disclosure of a percentage range similar to 
that proposed in the NPRM for Mid-Level Ethanol blends.\40\ API argued 
that a range disclosure would ``effectively alert[ ] the consumer to 
the presence of biodiesel'' in the fuel.\41\
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    \40\ Id. at 8.
    \41\ Id. In addition to the issues discussed in this section, 
Marathon opined that labeling requirements should not apply to 
biodiesel blends at or below 5 percent concentration. Marathon 
comment at 3. The Rule currently exempts such blends from labeling, 
and, as discussed below, the final amendments do not alter that 
exemption.
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C. Ethanol Fuel Labeling

    A majority of the commenters submitted views and evidence regarding 
the proposed ethanol fuel labeling disclosures. Generally, the 
commenters objected to the proposed labels' disclosures. Several 
commenters, including an association of ethanol producers, argued that 
the labels unfairly conveyed a negative message about the fuel's 
quality, with two of those commenters asserting that the proposed 
disclosures were beyond the Commission's authority under PMPA. In 
contrast, other commenters argued that the risks from ethanol 
misfueling necessitated a stronger and more precise disclosure 
regarding the amount of ethanol in the fuel and the suitability of such 
fuel for various vehicles or engines.
    As discussed below, the Commission is not announcing ethanol 
labeling amendments at this time. Therefore, this document will not 
analyze the ethanol labeling comments in depth.

D. Miscellaneous Issues

    Several comments raised miscellaneous issues. First, as discussed 
above, Tesoro and other commenters noted out-of-date ASTM references in 
the Rule. Second, API argued that the Rule should not require a 
Helvetica Black font but rather allow any legible block type font 
because Microsoft Word does not offer Helvetica Black.\42\ Third, API 
also noted its opposition to any provision that would impose liability 
for misfueling.\43\ Finally, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers 
suggested revising the biodiesel fuel definitions to make clear that 
the Rule covers blends of biodiesel and biomass-based diesel and 
suggested a series of edits (e.g., changing ``a percentage'' to ``the 
percentage'' in a Rule definition) to ensure consistency.
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    \42\ API comment at 6.
    \43\ Id. at 7.
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IV. Final Rule Amendments

    After considering the record, the Commission now issues final Rule 
amendments. Specifically, the Commission will issue amendments allowing 
octane rating through the On-Line Method and adopting several minor, 
miscellaneous amendments. In addition, the Commission retains the 
Rule's biodiesel fuel provisions in their current form.
    At this time, the Commission declines to issue ethanol fuel 
amendments because further consideration of the comments and EPA's 
recent waiver decision is necessary. The Commission also declines to 
issue amendments

[[Page 19688]]

allowing the Infrared Method or addressing ethanol octane rating 
because the record is not complete regarding those issues.\44\
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    \44\ As explained below, however, the Commission will consider 
publishing a separate notice of proposed rulemaking addressing the 
Infrared Method and ethanol octane rating.
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A. On-Line Method for Octane Rating

    The NPRM proposed allowing octane rating through the On-Line Method 
as specified in ASTM D2885. The Rule currently requires use of octane 
rating methods specified in ASTM D2699 and D2700. PMPA, however, 
authorizes the Commission to consider other methods. The On-Line Method 
detailed in ASTM D2885 produces the exact same octane rating as the 
D2699 and D2700 methods.\45\ Moreover, four commenters supported the 
proposed change, and none objected. Accordingly, the final amendments 
adopt the NPRM's amendment allowing octane rating through the On-Line 
Method.
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    \45\ See ASTM D2885, Standard Test Method for Determination of 
Octane Number of Spark-Ignition Engine Fuels by On-Line Direct 
Comparison Technique, available for inspection at the FTC's public 
reference room. Notably, D2885 provides that the On-Line Method will 
produce ``octane numbers'' as that term is defined in D2699 and 
D2700. See id. at Sec.  5.3.
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B. Miscellaneous Amendments

    Commenters raised several miscellaneous issues. First, some 
commenters noted that the current Rule and the proposed amendments 
contain outdated ASTM references. Accordingly, the final amendments 
update all ASTM references, including those proposed in the NPRM. The 
Commission does not, however, amend the Rule to adopt these standards 
without reference to a publication year, as suggested by some 
commenters. Doing so would incorporate those standards as they change 
over time. If a referenced ASTM standard changed in an unanticipated 
way, it could change the Rule's meaning without public notice and 
comment, or consideration by the Commission. Second, one commenter 
opposed any provision imposing liability for misfueling. Nothing in the 
Rule or the final amendments imposes such liability. Third, API noted 
that Helvetica Black font is not universally available. The final 
amendments, therefore, allow Helvetica Black or equivalent type. 
Finally, AAM suggested several technical amendments, including 
revisions to the biodiesel fuel definitions to make clear that the Rule 
covers blends of biodiesel and biomass-based diesel. Although the 
Commission does not intend to exclude such blends, the definitions of 
those fuels are prescribed by EISA and, therefore, the Commission 
declines to alter them.\46\ The amendments incorporate AAM's other 
technical suggestions, except those regarding the proposed ethanol 
amendments.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \46\ 42 U.S.C. 17021(c)(4) (defining biodiesel and biomass-based 
diesel blends as blended with ``petroleum-based diesel fuel'').
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition to the commenters' suggested changes, the Commission 
amends the Rule's labeling specifications to address an inconsistency. 
Section 306.12(b)(2) requires all uppercase type for labels for all 
alternative fuels. Sections 306.12(a)(4) through (9), however, require 
some lowercase type on biodiesel fuel labels. The Commission, 
therefore, amends Sec.  306.12(b)(2) to make clear that its all-caps 
requirement does not apply to labeling requirements for biodiesel 
fuels.\47\
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    \47\ The Commission also amends Sec. Sec.  306.0(b), (i), (j), 
and (l); 306.5; and 306.12(b) to correct typographical errors, and 
Sec.  306.0(i) for clarification by eliminating the subsection 
number (3) and replacing that with ``provided, however.''
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C. Biodiesel

    Several commenters urged the Commission to make three changes to 
the Rule's biodiesel fuel provisions. First, they reiterated an earlier 
request to require rating and certification of biodiesel blends at or 
below 5 percent concentration. Second, they asked the Commission to 
reconsider excluding biomass-based diesel (or at least a certain type 
of biomass-based diesel) from the Rule. Finally, API supported allowing 
a biodiesel content disclosure using a broad range.\48\ As explained 
below, the Commission declines to make any of these changes.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \48\ API's comment is unclear regarding how broad a range the 
Commission should permit. Currently, the Rule requires disclosure of 
an exact percentage.
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1. Rating and Certifying Biodiesel Blends of 5 Percent or Less 
Concentration
    In the NPRM, the Commission declined to propose amendments 
subjecting biodiesel blends at or below 5 percent concentration to the 
Rule's rating and certification requirements. The Commission explained 
that doing so would unnecessarily burden producers and distributors by 
requiring them to rate fuel that does not require a label under EISA 
\49\ and that retailers blending biodiesel did not need such rating and 
certifications to comply with the Rule. The comments did not challenge 
these conclusions. However, they did note that the Rule currently 
places the rating burden on blending retailers, which are generally 
small businesses, and argued that the Commission should shift the 
burden to producers and refiners that presumably could absorb the 
burden more easily.
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    \49\ See 42 U.S.C. 17021(b)(1) (biomass-based diesels and 
biodiesel blends of no more than 5 percent concentration ``shall not 
require any additional labels'').
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Although the Rule may burden small businesses, adopting the 
proposed change would increase the overall rating burden on industry. 
Currently, the Rule does not require rating or labeling of blends at or 
below 5 percent concentration. Under the commenters' proposed change, 
however, all manufacturers would have to rate these blends regardless 
of whether retailers would eventually use them to create a fuel subject 
to the Rule. The commenters have not provided evidence showing that the 
burden on retailers who blend a fraction of this fuel would be greater 
than the burden they propose putting on manufacturers to rate all of 
it. Therefore, the Commission declines to require such rating.
2. Exempting Biomass-Based or Renewable Diesel From the Rule
    In the NPRM, the Commission explained that it cannot exempt 
biomass-based diesel blends or provide for different labels because 
Section 205 of EISA specifically requires labels for all biomass-based 
diesel blends above 5 percent concentration.\50\ Thus, the Commission 
has no discretion to exempt biomass-based diesel from labeling 
requirements, regardless of the properties of the fuel or its purported 
suitability for all diesel engines.
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    \50\ Section 205 provides that ``[e]ach retail diesel fuel pump 
shall be labeled in a manner that informs consumers of the percent 
of biomass-based diesel or biodiesel that is contained in the 
biomass-based diesel blend or biodiesel blend that is offered for 
sale,'' and that all blends over 5 percent ``shall be labeled'' 
either ``contains biomass-based diesel or biodiesel in quantities 
between 5 percent and 20 percent'' or ``contains more than 20 
percent biomass-based diesel or biodiesel.'' 42 U.S.C. 17021(b); see 
also Biodiesel Fuel Rulemaking, 75 FR at 12475.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In response, API argued that, depending on how they are processed, 
certain renewable diesel blends would meet the statutory definition of 
``biomass-based diesel'' and other renewable diesel blends with the 
exact same properties would not. API characterized this result as 
``absurd.'' However, API's interpretation of the law appears to rest on 
a misreading of EISA. Specifically, API relies on a definition of 
``biomass-based diesel'' from Section 201 of EISA, but a different 
section of EISA defines ``biomass-based diesel'' for labeling purposes. 
Specifically, 42 U.S.C. 17021, which is titled ``Biomass-

[[Page 19689]]

based Diesel and Biodiesel Labeling,'' defines biomass-based diesel as 
any ``diesel fuel substitute produced from nonpetroleum renewable 
resources that meets the registration requirements for fuels and fuel 
additives established by the Environmental Protection Agency,'' without 
limitation, including limitations regarding co-processing.\51\ Thus, 
all renewable diesel blends discussed in the record are ``biomass-based 
diesel blends'' under EISA, and there is no inconsistency in treatment. 
Therefore, the Commission declines to make the requested change.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \51\ 42 U.S.C. 17021(c)(2) (incorporating the definition in 42 
U.S.C. 13220(f)).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

3. Allowing a Range Disclosure for Biodiesel Blends Above 20 Percent 
Concentration
    The Commission also declines to adopt API's suggestion to rescind 
the Rule's requirement to disclose the precise percentage of biodiesel 
for fuels over 20 percent concentration. As the Commission explained 
when it first announced the Rule's biodiesel provisions, the 
performance of biodiesel blends containing more than 20 percent 
biodiesel is uncertain and can vary significantly.\52\ The Commission 
further noted that this requirement provides information of interest to 
consumers who favor a fuel blend with a high percentage of non-
petroleum components.\53\ Therefore, the Commission retains the 
specific percentage designation requirement for biodiesel blends of 
more than 20 percent.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \52\ Biodiesel Fuel Rulemaking, 73 FR at 40158.
    \53\ Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

D. Ethanol

    In the NPRM, the Commission proposed new rating and certification 
requirements for Mid-Level Ethanol blends and new labeling requirements 
for all ethanol fuels. Specifically, the proposed amendments would have 
required rating and certifying Mid-Level Ethanol blends by their 
ethanol content and labeling all ethanol fuels with the statements:
     MAY HARM SOME VEHICLES
     CHECK OWNER'S MANUAL

The proposed amendments also would have required Mid-Level Ethanol 
blend labels to contain a content disclosure that the fuel contained 
between 10 to 70 percent ethanol (i.e., ``10%-70% ETHANOL''), a 
narrower range, or the precise amount of ethanol in the blend.
    As noted above, commenters generally criticized the proposed 
disclosures as unfairly denigrating ethanol or as insufficiently 
specific to prevent misfueling. In addition, after the FTC's Fuel 
Rating Rule comment period closed, EPA issued a Clean Air Act waiver 
allowing E15, which the proposed amendments defined as a Mid-Level 
Ethanol blend, in certain conventional vehicles.\54\ Specifically, in 
November 2010, EPA granted a waiver allowing E15 to be used in light-
duty \55\ conventional vehicles, model years 2007 and later.\56\ EPA 
extended the waiver in January 2011 to include light-duty conventional 
vehicles, model years 2001 and later.\57\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \54\ See Environmental Protection Agency: Partial Grant and 
Partial Denial of Clean Air Act Waiver Application Submitted by 
Growth Energy to Increase the Allowable Ethanol Content of Gasoline 
to 15 Percent; Decision of the Administrator, 75 FR 68094 (Nov. 4, 
2010) (``Waiver Decision'').
    \55\ ``Light-duty'' vehicles include passenger cars, light-duty 
trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles. See id. at 68095.
    \56\ Id.
    \57\ Environmental Protection Agency, Partial Grant of Clean Air 
Act Waiver Application Submitted by Growth Energy to Increase the 
Allowable Ethanol Content of Gasoline to 15 Percent; Decision of the 
Administrator, 76 FR 4662 (Jan. 26, 2011).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    However, EPA placed two significant conditions on its waiver. 
First, the fuel must meet certain fuel quality standards.\58\ Second, 
as part of EPA's efforts to limit E15 use to only certain conventional 
vehicles, the waiver requires E15 manufacturers to submit a plan for 
preventing misfueling. Their plan must include ``[r]easonable measures 
for ensuring that any retail fuel pump dispensers that are dispensing 
[E15] are clearly labeled for ensuring that consumers do not misfuel.'' 
\59\ In a separate Federal Register document, EPA proposed the 
following E15 label disclosure:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \58\ Waiver Decision, 75 FR at 68149-50.
    \59\ Id. at 68150.


                                CAUTION !
                 This fuel contains 15% ethanol maximum

                              Use only in:
                      2007 and newer gasoline cars
                    2007 and newer light-duty trucks
                           Flex-fuel vehicles

                 This fuel might damage other vehicles.
     Federal law prohibits its use in other vehicles and engines.60


    In light of the comments and EPA's waiver decision, the Commission 
finds that more time is necessary to address ethanol labeling.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \60\ Environmental Protection Agency, Regulation to Mitigate the 
Misfueling of Vehicles and Engines with Gasoline Containing Greater 
than Ten Volume Percent Ethanol and Modifications to the 
Reformulated and Conventional Gasoline Programs, 75 FR 68044, 68051 
(Nov. 4, 2010).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

E. The Infrared Method and E15 Octane Rating, Certification, and 
Posting

    Although the NPRM did not propose octane rating methods other than 
the On-Line Method, many commenters, including State regulators and the 
consumer group CAS, supported allowing the Infrared Method because it 
is more accurate than currently prescribed methods, less expensive, 
subject to an ASTM standard, and enables easy enforcement. In addition, 
commenters urged the Commission to require octane labels for E15 to 
assist owners of conventional cars that require higher-octane fuel 
(e.g., 93 octane). However, at this time the Commission declines to 
amend the Rule to allow the Infrared Method or address E15 octane 
labeling because the record is incomplete. Specifically, all parties 
that may have relevant information and views on such amendments have 
not had the opportunity to comment. Accordingly, the Commission will 
consider proposing these changes in a separate notice of proposed 
rulemaking, which will afford opportunity to comment to all interested 
parties.\61\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \61\ A second document is necessary because the Commission 
cannot propose further amendments in a final rule announcement.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

V. Paperwork Reduction Act

    The Fuel Rating Rule's octane rating and certification requirements 
constitute a ``collection of information'' under the Paperwork 
Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3501-3521) (``PRA''). Specifically, 
under the final amendments, refiners, importers, and producers of 
gasoline must determine the fuel's octane rating, and then certify that 
rating to any transferee. Furthermore, they must retain, for one year, 
records of any delivery tickets, letters of certification, or tests 
upon which they based the automotive fuel ratings that they 
certify.\62\ The covered parties also must make these records available 
for inspection by staff of the Commission and EPA or by persons 
authorized by those agencies.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \62\ See the Fuel Rating Rule's recordkeeping requirements, 16 
CFR 306.7; 306.9; and 306.11.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In its NPRM, the Commission estimated that the proposed amendments 
would impose additional recordkeeping and disclosure burdens. However, 
the Commission based those estimates on the proposed amendments related 
to rating, certifying, and labeling ethanol fuels. The Commission 
believes that the final amendments do not impose any additional burdens 
or costs as they provide an alternate octane rating method (i.e., the 
On-Line Method), but do not require it. The final amendments would 
still allow entities to rate octane as they did under the unamended 
Rule. Therefore, the Commission concludes that there are no

[[Page 19690]]

incremental hours or cost burden related to these amendments.
    Accordingly, the Commission believes that the final octane 
amendments will not impose any additional recordkeeping or disclosure 
burden. If the Commission issues final amendments regarding ethanol 
rating, certification, and labeling, it will re-examine the NPRM's 
burden estimates of those amendments.

VI. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601-612, requires an 
agency to provide a Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis with the 
final rule unless the agency certifies that the rule will not have a 
significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities.\63\ In the NPRM, the Commission certified that the proposed 
amendments would have no effect.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \63\ See 5 U.S.C. 603-605.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The FTC reaffirms its belief that the final amendments will not 
have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of small 
entities. As discussed in Section V, above, the amendments allowing 
alternative octane measurements do not impose any new costs on covered 
entities because those amendments provide those entities with the 
option of using the octane rating method currently required by the 
Rule. Although the NPRM provided an initial analysis of the amendments' 
impact on small entities, that analysis examined only the ethanol 
amendments, which provided new requirements.
    This document serves as notice to the Small Business Administration 
of the agency's certification of no effect. If the Commission issues 
final amendments regarding ethanol rating, certification, and labeling, 
it will assess the economic impact of the amendments on small entities.

List of Subjects in 16 CFR Part 306

    Fuel ratings, Incorporation by reference, Trade practices.

    For the reasons discussed in the preamble, the Federal Trade 
Commission amends title 16, Chapter I, Subchapter C, of the Code of 
Federal Regulations, part 306, as follows:

PART 306--AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING

0
1. Revise the authority citation for part 306 to read as follows:

    Authority: 15 U.S.C. 2801 et seq.; 42 U.S.C. 17021.


0
2. Amend Sec.  306.0 by:
0
a. Revising paragraph (b);
0
b. Adding a note to paragraph (i); and
0
c. Revising paragraphs (j) and (l).
    The revisions and addition read as follows:


Sec.  306.0  Definitions.

* * * * *
    (b) Research octane number and motor octane number. (1) These terms 
have the meanings given such terms in the specifications of ASTM 
International (``ASTM'') entitled ``Standard Specification for 
Automotive Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel (published November 2010)'' 
designated D4814-10b and, with respect to any grade or type of 
gasoline, are determined in accordance with test methods set forth in 
either:
    (i) ASTM D2699-09, ''Standard Test Method for Research Octane 
Number of Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel (published November 2009)'' and 
ASTM D2700-09, ``Standard Test Method for Motor Octane Number of Spark-
Ignition Engine Fuel (published November 2009)''; or
    (ii) ASTM D2885-10, ``Standard Test Method for Determination of 
Octane Number of Spark-Ignition Engine Fuels by On-Line Direct 
Comparison Technique (published March 2010).''
    (2) The incorporations by reference of ASTM D4814-10b, ASTM D2699-
09, ASTM D2700-09, and ASTM D2885-10 in paragraph (b)(1) of this 
Section, and in Sec.  306.5(a), were approved by the Director of the 
Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. 
Copies of ASTM D4814-10b, ASTM D2699-09, ASTM D2700-09, and ASTM D2885-
10, may be obtained from ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, 
West Conshohocken, PA 19428, or may be inspected at the Federal Trade 
Commission, Public Reference Room, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, 
NW., Washington, DC, or at the National Archives and Records 
Administration (``NARA''). For information on the availability of this 
material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/
federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.
* * * * *
    (i) * * *

    Note to paragraph (i): Provided, however, that biodiesel blends 
and biomass-based diesel blends that contain less than or equal to 5 
percent biodiesel by volume and less than or equal to 5 percent 
biomass-based diesel by volume, and that meet ASTM standard D975-09b 
``Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils (published August 
2009),'' are not automotive fuels covered by the requirements of 
this Part. The incorporation of ASTM D975-09b by reference was 
approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 
5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ASTM D975-09b may be 
obtained from ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West 
Conshohocken, PA 19428, or may be inspected at the Federal Trade 
Commission, Public Reference Room, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, NW., Washington, DC, or at NARA. For information on the 
availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: 
http://www.archives.gov/federal-register/cfr/ibr-locations.html.

    (j) Automotive fuel rating means-- (1) For gasoline, the octane 
rating.
    (2) For an alternative liquid automotive fuel other than biodiesel, 
biomass-based diesel, biodiesel blends, or biomass-based diesel blends, 
the commonly used name of the fuel with a disclosure of the amount, 
expressed as the minimum percentage by volume, of the principal 
component of the fuel. A disclosure of other components, expressed as 
the minimum percentage by volume, may be included, if desired.
    (3) For biomass-based diesel, biodiesel, biomass-based diesel 
blends with more than 5 percent biomass-based diesel, and biodiesel 
blends with more than 5 percent biodiesel, a disclosure of the biomass-
based diesel or biodiesel component, expressed as the percentage by 
volume.
* * * * *
    (l) Biodiesel means the monoalkyl esters of long chain fatty acids 
derived from plant or animal matter that meet: The registration 
requirements for fuels and fuel additives under 40 CFR part 79; and the 
requirements of ASTM standard D6751-10 ``Standard Specification for 
Biodiesel Fuel Blend Stock (B100) for Middle Distillate Fuels 
(published October 2010).'' The incorporation of ASTM D6751-10 by 
reference was approved by the Director of the Federal Register in 
accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of ASTM 
D6751B10 may be obtained from ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor 
Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428, or may be inspected at the Federal 
Trade Commission, Public Reference Room, Room 130, 600 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, NW., Washington, DC, or at NARA. For information on the 
availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: 
http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/cfr/ibr_locations.html.
* * * * *

0
3. Revise Sec.  306.5(a) to read as follows:


Sec.  306.5  Automotive fuel rating.

* * * * *
    (a) To determine the automotive fuel rating of gasoline, add the 
research octane number and the motor octane

[[Page 19691]]

number and divide by two, as explained by ASTM D4814-10b, ``Standard 
Specifications for Automotive Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel,'' 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  306.0(b)(2)). To determine the 
research octane and motor octane numbers you may either:
    (1) Use ASTM standard test method ASTM D2699-09, ``Standard Test 
Method for Research Octane Number of Spark-Ignition Engine Fuel'' 
(incorporated by reference, see Sec.  306.0(b)(2)), to determine the 
research octane number, and ASTM standard test method ASTM D2700-09, 
``Standard Test Method for Motor Octane Number of Spark-Ignition Engine 
Fuel'' (incorporated by reference, see Sec.  306.0(b)(2)), to determine 
the motor octane number; or
    (2) Use the test method set forth in ASTM D2885-10, ``Standard Test 
Method for Determination of Octane Number of Spark-Ignition Engine 
Fuels by On-Line Direct Comparison Technique'' (incorporated by 
reference, see Sec.  306.0(b)(2)).
* * * * *

0
4. Revise Sec.  306.6(b) to read as follows:


Sec.  306.6  Certification.

* * * * *
    (b) Give the person a letter or other written statement. This 
letter must include the date, your name, the other person's name, and 
the automotive fuel rating of any automotive fuel you will transfer to 
that person from the date of the letter onwards. Octane rating numbers 
may be rounded to a whole or half number equal to or less than the 
number determined by you. This letter of certification will be good 
until you transfer automotive fuel with a lower automotive fuel rating, 
except that a letter certifying the fuel rating of biomass-based 
diesel, biodiesel, a biomass-based diesel blend, or a biodiesel blend 
will be good only until you transfer those fuels with a different 
automotive fuel rating, whether the rating is higher or lower. When 
this happens, you must certify the automotive fuel rating of the new 
automotive fuel either with a delivery ticket or by sending a new 
letter of certification.
* * * * *

0
5. Amend Sec.  306.12 by revising paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(5) and 
(b) to read as follows:


Sec.  306.12  Labels.

* * * * *
    (a) Layout--(1) For gasoline labels. The label is 3 inches (7.62 
cm) wide x 2\1/2\ inches (6.35 cm) long. The illustrations appearing at 
the end of this rule are prototype labels that demonstrate the proper 
layout. ``Helvetica Black'' or equivalent type is used throughout 
except for the octane rating number on octane labels, which is in 
Franklin gothic type. All type is centered. Spacing of the label is \1/
4\ inch (.64 cm) between the top border and the first line of text, \1/
8\ inch (.32 cm) between the first and second line of text, \1/4\ inch 
(.64 cm) between the octane rating and the line of text above it. All 
text and numerals are centered within the interior borders.
    (2) For alternative liquid automotive fuel labels (one principal 
component), other than biodiesel, biomass-based diesel, biodiesel 
blends, or biomass-based diesel blends. The label is 3 inches (7.62 cm) 
wide x 2\1/2\ inches (6.35 cm) long. ``Helvetica Black'' or equivalent 
type is used throughout. All type is centered. The band at the top of 
the label contains the name of the fuel. This band should measure 1 
inch (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the fuel name is \1/4\ inch (.64 cm) 
from the top of the label and \3/16\ inch (.48 cm) from the bottom of 
the black band, centered horizontally within the black band. The first 
line of type beneath the black band is \1/8\ inch (.32 cm) from the 
bottom of the black band. All type below the black band is centered 
horizontally, with \1/8\ inch (.32 cm) between each line. The bottom 
line of type is \3/16\ inch (.48 cm) from the bottom of the label. All 
type should fall no closer than \3/16\ inch (.48 cm) from the side 
edges of the label. If you wish to change the dimensions of this one 
principal component label to accommodate a fuel descriptor that is 
longer than shown in the sample labels, you must petition the Federal 
Trade Commission. You can do this by writing to the Secretary of the 
Federal Trade Commission, Washington, DC 20580. You must state the size 
and contents of the label that you wish to use, and the reasons that 
you want to use it.
    (3) For alternative liquid automotive fuel labels (two components). 
The label is 3 inches (7.62 cm) wide x 2\1/2\ inches (6.35 cm) long. 
``Helvetica Black'' or equivalent type is used throughout. All type is 
centered. The band at the top of the label contains the name of the 
fuel. This band should measure 1 inch (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the 
fuel name is \1/4\ inch (.64 cm) from the top of the label and \3/16\ 
inch (.48 cm) from the bottom of the black band, centered horizontally 
within the black band. The first line of type beneath the black band is 
\3/16\ inch (.48 cm) from the bottom of the black band. All type below 
the black band is centered horizontally, with \1/8\ inch (.32 cm) 
between each line. The bottom line of type is \1/4\ inch (.64 cm) from 
the bottom of the label. All type should fall no closer than \3/16\ 
inch (.48 cm) from the side edges of the label. If you wish to change 
the dimensions of this two component label to accommodate additional 
fuel components, you must petition the Federal Trade Commission. You 
can do this by writing to the Secretary of the Federal Trade 
Commission, Washington, DC 20580. You must state the size and contents 
of the label that you wish to use, and the reasons that you want to use 
it.
    (4) For biodiesel blends containing more than 5 percent and no 
greater than 20 percent biodiesel by volume. (i) The label is 3 inches 
(7.62 cm) wide x 2\1/2\ inches (6.35 cm) long. ``Helvetica Black'' or 
equivalent type is used throughout. All type is centered. The band at 
the top of the label contains either:
    (A) The capital letter ``B'' followed immediately by the numerical 
value representing the volume percentage of biodiesel in the fuel 
(e.g., ``B20'') and then by the term ``Biodiesel Blend''; or
    (B) The term ``Biodiesel Blend.''
    (ii) The band should measure 1 inch (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the 
text in the band is \1/4\ inch (.64 cm) from the top of the label and 
\3/16\ inch (.48 cm) from the bottom of the black band, centered 
horizontally within the black band. Directly underneath the black band, 
the label shall read ``contains biomass-based diesel or biodiesel in 
quantities between 5 percent and 20 percent.'' The script underneath 
the black band must be centered horizontally, with \1/8\ inch (.32 cm) 
between each line. The bottom line of type is \1/4\ inch (.64 cm) from 
the bottom of the label. All type should fall no closer than \3/16\ 
inch (.48 cm) from the side edges of the label.
    (5) For biomass-based diesel blends containing more than 5 percent 
and no greater than 20 percent biomass-based diesel by volume. (i) The 
label is 3 inches (7.62 cm) wide x 2\1/2\ inches (6.35 cm) long. 
``Helvetica Black'' or equivalent type is used throughout. All type is 
centered. The band at the top of the label contains either:
    (A) The numerical value representing the volume percentage of 
biomass-based diesel in the fuel followed immediately by the percentage 
symbol (e.g., ``20%'') and then by the term ``Biomass-Based Diesel 
Blend''; or
    (B) The term ``Biomass-Based Diesel Blend.''
    (ii) The band should measure 1 inch (2.54 cm) deep. Spacing of the 
text in the band is \1/4\ inch (.64 cm) from the top of the label and 
3/16 inch (.48 cm) from the bottom of the black band, centered 
horizontally within the black band. Directly underneath the black band, 
the label shall read ``contains biomass-based

[[Page 19692]]

diesel or biodiesel in quantities between 5 percent and 20 percent.'' 
The script underneath the black band must be centered horizontally, 
with \1/8\ inch (.32 cm) between each line. The bottom line of type is 
\1/4\ inch (.64 cm) from the bottom of the label. All type should fall 
no closer than 3/16 inch (.48 cm) from the side edges of the label.
* * * * *
    (b) Type size and setting--(1) For gasoline labels. The Helvetica 
series or equivalent type is used for all numbers and letters with the 
exception of the octane rating number. Helvetica is available in a 
variety of phototype setting systems, by linotype, and in a variety of 
computer desk-top and phototype setting systems. Its name may vary, but 
the type must conform in style and thickness to the sample provided 
here. The line ``Minimum Octane Rating'' is set in 12 point Helvetica 
Bold, all capitals, with letterspace set at 12\1/2\ points. The line 
``(R+M)/2 METHOD'' is set in 10 point Helvetica Bold, all capitals, 
with letterspace set at 10\1/2\ points. The octane number is set in 96 
point Franklin gothic condensed with \1/8\ inch (.32 cm) space between 
the numbers.
    (2) For alternative liquid automotive fuel labels (one principal 
component). Except as provided above, labels should conform to the 
following specifications. All type should be set in upper case (all 
caps) ``Helvetica Black'' or equivalent type throughout. Helvetica 
Black is available in a variety of computer desk-top and phototype 
setting systems. Its name may vary, but the type must conform in style 
and thickness to the sample provided here. The spacing between letters 
and words should be set as ``normal.'' The type for the fuel name is 50 
point (\1/2\ inch (1.27 cm) cap height) ``Helvetica Black,'' knocked 
out of a 1 inch (2.54 cm) deep band. The type for the words ``MINIMUM'' 
and the principal component is 24 point (\1/4\ inch (.64 cm) cap 
height). The type for percentage is 36 point (\3/8\ inch (.96 cm) cap 
height).
    (3) For alternative liquid automotive fuel labels (two components). 
All type should be set in upper case (all caps) ``Helvetica Black'' or 
equivalent type throughout. Helvetica Black is available in a variety 
of computer desk-top and phototype setting systems. Its name may vary, 
but the type must conform in style and thickness to the sample provided 
here. The spacing between letters and words should be set as 
``normal.'' The type for the fuel name is 50 point (\1/2\ inch (1.27 
cm) cap height) ``Helvetica Black,'' knocked out of a 1 inch (2.54 cm) 
deep band. All other type is 24 point (\1/4\ inch (.64 cm) cap height).
* * * * *

    By direction of the Commission.
Donald S. Clark,
Secretary.
[FR Doc. 2011-8097 Filed 4-7-11; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6750-01-P



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