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When Buying a Used Audi, A Audi Service Center Alert You To Any Potential Problems Before You Buy


Topics:  Audi

When Buying a Used Audi, A Audi Service Center Alert You To Any Potential Problems Before You Buy

Stephen Daniels
August 28, 2011

If your motor vehicle dreams are dominated by Q7s, TDIs or A8s, then you're a certifiable Audi aficionado. But if your dreams are fuller than your budget, you may well be thinking about buying used as opposed to new. Though your savings would be significant, it should go without saying that you should have the potential ride tested at an Audi auto service center first. While most used car vendors are trustworthy, they may not know Audis as well as domestic vehicles, and of course, making the sale is always the highest priority.

While the Audi auto repair and service center ought to know what to look for, it never hurts if you sound knowledgeable when you take the car in, and be sure that computerized diagnostic testing is done. For a used Audi with 75,000 miles or more some key items to have checked out include:

• The cambelt or timing belt. Although this part somewhat resembles a vacuum cleaner belt, it controls the timing of car engine's valves and will take three hours to properly remove, inspect and replace if necessary.The manufacturer recommends replacement at 75,000 miles. Was it replaced on the vehicle that you're looking at?

• Brake fluid. This is meant to be replaced every two years, so a complete service history should reflect this.

• Transmission fluid. Audi recommends it be changed every 40,000 miles.

• Air conditioning: Sure, this is a personal comfort system, but it also purifies the air in the cabin and should be at least "refreshed" every two years.

• Tires: The older the car, the less its tires can be relied on for effective acceleration, steering and safe stopping distances. Moreover, tires with good treads contribute to gas mileage and reduced Co2 emissions.

A good way to check on the history of your used Audi is to research its CARFAX Vehicle History Report. These reports key off the vehicle identification number, or VIN (found on the lower left part of the windshield), to generate details of title, accident history, odometer readings, engine performance tests and the like.

If things are still looking good, the next step is to find out if the manufacturer's warranty remains in place and whether it stays with the car regardless of a change in ownership. If you choose to purchase a new extended warranty, in the words of the old song, "You gotta shop around." That means don't just bite on the dealer's warranty product. The best buy could be available at an Audi backed service provider, or some online source, but be sure to determine the reliability of the company you are purchasing from.

Finally, not to overstate the obvious, but, you'll want to do a test drive. Look for any transmission slipping or hesitation; strange vibrations or warning lights flashing into life on the dashboard. Don't overlook hitting the freeway where many potential problems might be observed that were absent at lower speeds; pay attention to any strange tire sounds, pulling to the left or right, cruise control, and your ease of passing. Don't forget to test the brakes.

After you've brought your baby home, be sure to keep it maintained at an Audi auto service shop. Since this is an older imported vehicle, it helps to do business with specialists who are informed about German engineering, and who have established contacts for acquiring older parts if necessary.

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If you are looking for Audi auto repair and maintenance service in the Denver area, http://www.sixthaveauto.com is highly recommended by author Stephen Daniels. They specialize in working on Audi and Volkswagen vehicles, but service all makes and models. All work is performed by ASE-certified technicians.

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