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Lincoln Continental

American Government Special Collections Reference Desk

Continental
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Wikipedia: Lincoln Continental

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Lincoln Mark VI
Lincoln Mark VII

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A luxury car produced by Lincoln beginning in 1939 as a unique coachbuilt car for Edsel Ford based on the Lincoln-Zephyr.

Awards and acknowledgements include:
The 1940-1941 is among "The 25 Most Beautiful Cars of All Time" by Automobile, September 2006
The 1961 is among "The 25 Most Beautiful Cars of All Time" by Automobile, September 2006

History

The following section is an excerpt from Wikipedia's Lincoln Continental page on 12 December 2017, text available via the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Lincoln Continental is a series of luxury cars produced by Lincoln, a division of the American automaker Ford Motor Company. First introduced in 1939 as a coachbuilt convertible for Edsel Ford, the Continental nameplate has been in use by Lincoln across ten generations of vehicles for various times over nearly 80 years. The Continental nameplate is derived from the original 1939 convertible, intended to adapt European "continental" exterior styling elements to the body and chassis of the Lincoln-Zephyr.

Following its launch, the Lincoln Continental would become the progenitor of an entirely new automotive segment, the personal luxury car. Following World War II, the segment evolved into coupes and convertibles larger than sports cars and grand touring cars with an emphasis on luxury and style over handling. From 1956 to 1957, the Continental nameplate also saw use in the short-lived Continental Division, marketing the Continental Mark II as the flagship of Ford Motor Company from 1956 and 1957; Lincoln revived the Continental Mark series in 1969 as a successor.

In the Lincoln model line, the Continental has served several roles, ranging from the flagship of the Lincoln line in addition to its base-trim sedan; from 1961 to 1976, the Lincoln Continental was the sole nameplate sold by the division. Through its 51-year production run, the Continental has been produced in two-door and four-door sedans, hardtops, and convertibles. Along with the model being the final American factory-produced vehicle with a V12 engine (in 1948), the Lincoln Continental is the final example produced as a four-door convertible (in 1967); the Lincoln Continental was the final model line to undergo downsizing.

Alongside the suspension of automobile production throughout World War II, the Lincoln Continental nameplate has gone on hiatus twice. In 1981, the model was briefly cancelled, as the redesigned 1982 Continental was released early. From 2003 to 2016, the Continental was also absent from the Lincoln line as well. Initially discontinued in favor of the Lincoln LS and Lincoln Town Car, the 2009-2016 Lincoln MKS effectively replaced all three sedans.

For the 2017 model year, Lincoln marked the return of the Lincoln Continental nameplate with an all-new flagship sedan, replacing the Lincoln MKS; the introduction also marks the phasing out of the Lincoln "MK" branding. Making its debut as a concept car at the 2015 New York Auto Show, the 2017 Lincoln Continental is a four-door sedan based on an extended-wheelbase version of the Ford CD4 platform shared with the seventh-generation Ford Taurus and Lincoln MKZ.

Edsel Ford prototype (1939)

The Lincoln Continental began life as a personal vehicle for Ford Motor Company President Edsel Ford. In 1938, Ford commissioned a one-off design he wanted ready for his March 1939 vacation from company Chief Stylist Eugene T. "Bob" Gregorie. Using the blueprints of the streamlined Lincoln-Zephyr as a starting point, Gregorie sketched a design for a convertible with a redesigned body; allegedly, the initial sketch for the design was completed in an hour.

At the time work had begun on the first Continental coupe, Lincoln had previously cancelled the Lincoln K-series coupes, sedans, and limousines, and produced the very limited Lincoln Custom limousine, along with the smaller Lincoln-Zephyr coupes and sedans. Mr. Ford wanted to revive the popularity of the 1929–1932 Lincoln Victoria coupe and convertible but with a more modern approach, reflecting European styling influences for the Continental.

By design, the Edsel Ford prototype could be considered a channelled and sectioned Lincoln-Zephyr convertible; although the vehicle wore a conventional windshield profile, the prototype sat nearly 7 inches lower than a standard Lincoln. With the massive decrease in height, the running boards were deleted entirely. In contrast to the Zephyr (and in a massive change from the K-Series Lincoln), the hood sat nearly level with the fenders. To focus on the styling of the car, the chrome trim on the car was largely restricted to the grille; instead of door handles, pushbuttons opened the doors. As with the Lincoln-Zephyr, the prototype was fitted with a 267 cubic-inch V12 engine; it was fitted with front and rear transverse leaf springs and hydraulic drum brakes.

The design would introduce two long-running features used in many American automobile designs. The modified body gave the design new proportions over its Zephyr counterpart; with the hoodline sitting lower over the V12 engine and the passenger compartment moved rearward, the prototype had more in common with classic era "long-hood, short deck" body configurations versus being a strict adherent of contemporary streamline moderne design trends. As a consequence of the smaller trunk space, the spare tire was mounted behind the trunk; while disappearing on American cars, the externally mounted, covered spare tire remained a feature on European-produced cars.

The prototype designed by Gregorie was produced on time, making the deadline to be delivered to Edsel Ford in Florida. Interest from well-off friends was high; Edsel sent a telegram back to Michigan that he could sell a thousand of them. In reference to its European-inspired design, the Lincoln-based prototype received its name: Continental.

Immediately, production commenced on the Lincoln Continental, with the majority of production being "Cabriolet" convertibles and a rare number of coupes. They were extensively hand-built; the two dozen 1939 models and 400 1940-built examples were built with hand-hammered body panels; dies for machine-pressing were not constructed until 1941. The limited number of 1939 models produced are commonly referred to as '1940 Continentals'.

First generation (1939–48)

Lincoln Continentals from 1939 to 1941 shared largely the same body design with each other; based on the Lincoln-Zephyr, the Continental received few updates from year to year.

For the 1942 model year, all Lincoln models were given squared-up fenders, and a revised grille. The result was a boxier, somewhat heavier look in keeping with then-current design trends, but perhaps less graceful in retrospect. 1942 production was shortened, following the entry of the United States into World War II; the attack on Pearl Harbor led to the suspension of production of automobiles for civilian use.

After World War II, the Lincoln division of Ford returned the Continental to production as a 1946 model; Lincoln dropped the Zephyr nomenclature following the war, so the postwar Continental was derived from the standard Lincoln (internally H-Series). To attract buyers, the design was refreshed with updated trim, distinguished by a new grille. For 1947, walnut wood trim was added to the interior.

Following the death of Edsel Ford in 1943, Ford Motor Company re-organized its corporate management structure, which led to the 1946 departure of the Continental's designer Bob Gregorie. 1948 would become the last year for the Continental, as the division sought to redevelop its new 1949 model line as an upgraded version of the Mercury; the expensive personal-luxury car no longer had a role at Lincoln.

The 1939–1948 Continental is recognized as a "Full Classic" by the Classic Car Club of America, one of the last-built cars to be so recognized. As of 2015, the 1948 Lincoln Continental and 1948 Lincoln were the last cars produced and sold by a major U.S. automaker with a V12 engine.

Second generation (1956–57)

After an eight-year hiatus, the Continental nameplate made its return for the 1956 model year. To showcase the European influence of its predecessor, Ford assigned the new vehicle a "Mark II" suffix (also in an effort to avoid confusion with the similar Bentley Continental of the time). To launch the Mark II, Ford Motor Company created a distinct Continental Division to market the vehicle as its flagship. Added as a third division above Lincoln-Mercury, Continental was marketed and serviced through the Lincoln dealership network.

In 1956, the $10,000 (equivalent to nearly $90,000 in 2016) Continental Mark II was the most expensive domestically-produced automobile sold in the United States; at five times the price of a Ford Customline, the Mark II rivaled a Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud in price. With a large number of power-equipment features included, Continental offered only a single option with the Mark II, charging $595 to add air conditioning. In nearly the reverse of its predecessor, the Mark II was produced exclusively as a two-door hardtop, with two convertibles produced as prototypes.

Third generation (1958–1960)

For the 1958 model year, to build a better business case for the Continental, the separate Ford Motor Company division was redesigned. To justify its future, Continental remained the flagship of Ford Motor Company; instead of rivaling Rolls-Royce, the division was repackaged as the Ford Motor Company competitor for luxury cars such as the Cadillac Eldorado and Imperial LeBaron. To increase the number of potential buyers, Continental was forced to reduce its price nearly 40%, to $6000.

Nicknamed the "slant-eyed monster" in the Ford design studio, the Mark III would become one of the largest sedans ever built by Ford Motor Company.

Fourth generation (1961–1969)

For the 1961 model year the Lincoln range was consolidated into one model. Following the $60 million in losses to develop the 1958–1960 cars, all models were replaced by a new Lincoln Continental. Making its first appearance since 1948, the fourth-generation was available only as a four-door sedan and convertible.

Although shedding nearly 15 inches in length and 8 inches in wheelbase over its 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V predecessor, the new model was nevertheless heavier than its Cadillac or Imperial counterparts. Its solid construction and rigorous post-build inspection of each vehicle reflected Ford corporate management's commitment to making the finest mass-produced domestic automobile of its time – an enviable reputation it achieved.

The fourth-generation Lincoln Continental was styled by Ford design vice president Elwood Engel. In mid-1958, Lincoln was struggling against Cadillac, with its lack of profitability putting the future of the division at risk. In 1958, Engel developed a proposal for the 1961 Ford Thunderbird with staffers Howard Payne and John Orfe in 1958. While the proposal was not selected for the Thunderbird, the design interested Ford executives to the point of desiring the vehicle as a four-door Lincoln.

At the time of the approval, Ford product planners had come to two conclusions critical to restoring the Lincoln Division to profitability. First, to instill design continuity, Lincoln would adopt a model cycle distinct from Ford or Mercury, moving from three years to eight or nine. Second, the 1958 Lincoln model line was too large for a standard-length sedan; consequently, the 1961 Lincoln would have to decrease its exterior footprint.

Fifth generation (1970–79)

For the 1970 model year, Lincoln introduced the fifth-generation Lincoln Continental. Following the 1969 introduction of the Continental Mark III and the revival of the Town Car nameplate, in only one year, Lincoln dealers had expanded their product range. Building on the success of the Mark III, Lincoln sought to modernize the Continental (and Town Car) for the 1970s, after a nine-year production run.

Although shorter in wheelbase and slightly narrower than 1958-1960 Lincolns, the addition of 5-mph bumpers make 1977-1979 Lincolns the longest automobiles ever produced by Ford Motor Company.

Sixth generation (1980)

With the impending adoption of federal fuel-economy standards (CAFE) making the large cars of the 1970s a potential financial threat to Ford Motor Company, the full-size cars of all of its divisions underwent extensive downsizing for the 1979 model year. For various reasons, delays pushed the release of the downsized Lincoln model lineup into 1980, three years after the downsizing of its Cadillac counterparts.

The downsizing undergone by the 1980 Lincoln and Mark provided Lincoln with the best year-to-year fuel economy improvement (38%) in Ford history. The introduction of a standard overdrive transmission enabled the division to leap its competitors, going from the company with the worst CAFE rating to the most fuel-efficient full-size car sold.

One of the most touted options the 1980 Continental offered was the new digital instrument cluster, which used vacuum fluorescent displays for the vehicle speedometer, odometer, fuel gauge, and temperature gauge. However, the biggest feature was the included "trip computer" that showed the driver "miles to empty" and (based on driver input) an "estimated time of arrival", as well as real-time average fuel economy figures. The digital instrument cluster with the trip computer, along with the engine's new standard electronic fuel injection, 4-speed AOD transmission, power steering and suspension advances, and the new EEC III engine management system allowed the 1980 Lincoln Continental to gain a major technological advantage over its competition; instead of being just a mere redesign and downsize of the 1979 models, the 1980 Continentals would be some of the most advanced vehicles ever sold by Ford up to that point.

This version of the Continental would last only for a single model year. To eliminate saturation of the Lincoln model line, the car was re-released as the Lincoln Town Car for 1981, while the Continental name would move to the midsize segment as an early 1982 model. While not officially announced as the replacement for the Versailles, the 1982 Continental would become the Lincoln competitor for the Cadillac Seville. After the end of its model cycle, the Continental Mark VI was replaced by the Mark VII, a far different vehicle.

Seventh generation (1982–87)

Following the downsizing and adoption of the Panther platform for the 1980 model year, the Lincoln division was faced with a critical issue. After the discontinuation of the compact Lincoln Versailles early in 1980, Lincoln was left with two full-size sedans. Although each brand-new for the model year, the Lincoln Continental and Continental Mark VI were functionally identical vehicles. Aside from the "Continental tire" trunklid and hidden headlamps of the Mark VI, the two vehicles offered little differentiation.

The Lincoln Continental made its return in early 1981 as a 1982 model. To further separate Continental from the Town Car, Lincoln designers shifted the car into the mid-size segment. Though again marketed against the Cadillac Seville, the 1982 Lincoln Continental was never officially considered by Lincoln as the replacement for the Versailles. Marketed solely as a four-door sedan, the Continental was the first (and currently, only) Lincoln ever to wear the "Continental trunklid" of the Mark series. It shared its wheelbase and powertrain with the Mark VII introduced for the 1984 model year.

Using the lessons learned from Lincoln Versailles and badge engineering, Lincoln stylists took great care to differentiate the expensive Continental from the Ford Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar XR7 sharing a common chassis with it; unlike the Versailles, no visible body panels were shared.

Eighth generation (1988–94)

By the late 1980s, the luxury segment in which the Continental competed had changed drastically from a decade before. In addition to traditional competitors Cadillac and Chrysler, the downsized Continental now competed not only against Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Audi but with the top of the line vehicles of Acura, Lexus, and Infiniti. Lincoln chose to completely reinvent the Continental.

Sharing its unibody chassis with the Ford Taurus and Mercury Sable, the 1988 Continental became the first front-wheel drive Lincoln; it was also the first Lincoln since 1948 sold without an available V8 engine. As part of a more conservative exterior, the sloping "Continental trunklid" was deleted. Although four inches longer, it was 170 pounds lighter than its predecessor. For the first time since 1980, the Continental closely matched its Cadillac Sedan de Ville counterpart in size. By interior volume the Continental was the largest front-wheel drive car sold in 1988, and was recognized by Car and Driver on its 1989 Ten Best list.

Power was provided by a 140 hp 3.8L Essex V6 newly introduced to the Taurus/Sable for 1988. Exclusive to the Continental was adaptive air-ride suspension. Variable assist power steering was standard. In 1991, engine output was revised to 155 hp, and to 160 hp in 1993. All Continentals were equipped with a 4-speed overdrive automatic transmission.

Ninth generation (1995–2002)

For the 1995 model year, the Continental was substantially updated with more rounded lines similar to the Mark VIII; the interior also saw a major overhaul. Production commenced at Wixom Assembly in November 1994. While the body was all-new, the new Continental shared underpinnings with the previous generation. In a departure from the previous generation and its Ford/Mercury counterparts, the Continental was given back its V8 engine for the first time since 1987; thus, it more closely matched the Northstar V8 engine that Cadillac was using for its DeVille and Seville sedans at the time.

After several years of decreasing sales, Lincoln announced that 2002 would be last year for the Continental. Along with declining sales, the cancellation of the Continental was caused by several factors. For 2000, Lincoln introduced the mid-size rear-wheel drive Lincoln LS V6 & V8 sedans. While smaller than the Continental, the V8 version of the LS gave Lincoln a third V8-engined luxury sedan. In addition, all three vehicles competed fairly close in price.

All Continentals built since 1958 were assembled at Ford's Wixom Assembly Plant. The last Lincoln Continental rolled off the assembly line there on July 26, 2002. The plant continued to manufacture the Town Car and the LS, as well as the limited production Ford Thunderbird 2-seat convertible and Ford's niche sports car, the Ford GT. Lincoln's Town Car was the last model still produced there when the Wixom facility was shut down in 2007.

Tenth generation (2017–present)

After a fifteen-year absence/hiatus from the Lincoln model line, a new tenth generation Continental went on sale in the fall of 2016. Previewed by a namesake concept car at the 2015 New York Auto Show, the 2017 Lincoln Continental is the successor of the Lincoln MKS. Alongside the Ford Mustang, the Continental is manufactured in Flat Rock, Michigan.

The tenth generation Continental is derived from the front-wheel drive Ford CD4 platform. Along with the seventh-generation Ford Taurus (currently sold only in China) and Lincoln MKZ, the Continental shares its chassis underpinnings with the Ford Fusion (Mondeo) but rides on a 5.7 in (145 mm) longer wheelbase. All-wheel drive is available as an option.


Photographs

1956 Lincoln Continental 1956
Photo ©2018 Bill Crittenden
2018 Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show
View photo of 1956 Lincoln Continental - 2.7MB
1956 Lincoln Continental 1956
Photo ©2018 Bill Crittenden
2018 Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show
View photo of 1956 Lincoln Continental - 2.4MB
1956 Lincoln Continental 1956
Photo ©2018 Bill Crittenden
2018 Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show
View photo of 1956 Lincoln Continental - 2.1MB
1956 Lincoln Continental 1956
Photo ©2018 Bill Crittenden
2018 Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show
View photo of 1956 Lincoln Continental - 3.1MB
1956 Lincoln Continental 1956
Photo ©2018 Bill Crittenden
2018 Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show
View photo of 1956 Lincoln Continental - 2.7MB
1956 Lincoln Continental 1956
Photo ©2018 Bill Crittenden
2018 Woodstock on the Square Benefit Car Show
View photo of 1956 Lincoln Continental - 2.4MB
I Wish I Had That Swing in My Back Yard 1958 Lincoln Continental Art I Wish I Had That Swing in My Back Yard
Artist: Ken Eberts
Car: 1958 Lincoln Continental
Image courtesy CarArt.us
View "I Wish I Had That Swing in My Back Yard" - 1958 Lincoln Continental Art - 83KB
The Art of Elegance 1961 Lincoln Continental Art The Art of Elegance
Artist: Ken Eberts
Car: 1961 Lincoln Continental


Image courtesy CarArt.us
View "The Art of Elegance" - 1961 Lincoln Continental Art - 80KB
1960's Lincoln Continental Fourth Generation
Photo by Serge Kutuzov on Unsplash
View photo of 1960's Lincoln Continental - 8.0MB
1972 Lincoln Town Car Continental 1972 Town Car Continental
for $5,000
2013 Mecum Chicago Auction
Photo ©2013 Bill Crittenden
View photo of 1972 Lincoln Town Car Continental - 4.4MB
1972 Lincoln Town Car Continental 1972 Town Car Continental
for $5,000
2013 Mecum Chicago Auction
Photo ©2013 Bill Crittenden
View photo of 1972 Lincoln Town Car Continental - 4.4MB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Convertible by American Custom Coachworks 1978 Mark V Convertible by American Custom Coachworks
for $15,000
2013 Mecum Chicago Auction
Photo ©2013 Bill Crittenden
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Convertible by American Custom Coachworks - 3.1MB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Convertible by American Custom Coachworks 1978 Mark V Convertible by American Custom Coachworks
for $15,000
2013 Mecum Chicago Auction
Photo ©2013 Bill Crittenden
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Convertible by American Custom Coachworks - 218KB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Hot Rod Lincoln 1978 Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln"
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
Reserve not met ($4,000 high bid) at the Mecum 2012 Fall Premier Auction
Mecum Auctions
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln" - 2.8MB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Hot Rod Lincoln 1978 Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln"
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
Reserve not met ($4,000 high bid) at the Mecum 2012 Fall Premier Auction
Mecum Auctions
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln" - 3.5MB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Hot Rod Lincoln 1978 Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln"
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
Reserve not met ($4,000 high bid) at the Mecum 2012 Fall Premier Auction
Mecum Auctions
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln" - 3.3MB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Hot Rod Lincoln 1978 Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln"
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
Reserve not met ($4,000 high bid) at the Mecum 2012 Fall Premier Auction
Mecum Auctions
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln" - 4.0MB
1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V Hot Rod Lincoln 1978 Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln"
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
Reserve not met ($4,000 high bid) at the Mecum 2012 Fall Premier Auction
Mecum Auctions
View photo of 1978 Lincoln Continental Mark V "Hot Rod Lincoln" - 3.5MB
1979 Lincoln Continental 1979
Lincoln-Mercury Public Relations Photograph
Lincoln Continental's traditional luxury, classic styling, and spaciousness has been additionally dramatized for 1979 by an expanded range of special models.  Besides the standard two-door and four-door sedans and the Town Coupe and Town Car (above), the 1979 model year marks the debut of a special Collector's Series to commemorate the final year of the traditional full-sized Lincoln.  In addition, the distinctive Williamsburg Series has been expanded to include seven dual-shade paint combinations.  Functional refinements for 1979 include greater heating-system efficiency for improved passenger comfort and redesigned door and ignition locks for greater theft protection.
View photo of 1979 Lincoln Continental - 3.2MB
1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V 1979 Mark V
Lincoln-Mercury Public Relations Photograph
The Continental Mark V extends its stewardship of the luxury specialty market in 1979 with unique feature models projecting the ultimate in tasteful distinctiveness.  The special models include a Collector's Series Mark to commemorate the final year of the traditional full-sized Mark V, new versions of the four Designer Mark Vs and nine versions of the Luxury Group series (above).  In addition, several new exterior and interior color selections are offered on the standard 1979 Mark V models.
View photo of 1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V - 3.6MB
1979 Lincoln Continental 1979 2-Door Hardtop 400ci, Automatic
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
for $3,500 at the Mecum 2012 Fall Premier Auction
Mecum Auctions
View photo of 1979 Lincoln Continental - 2.8MB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,927KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,212KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,319KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,281KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 4,024KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,958KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 2,753KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2009 Bill Crittenden
2009 Nostalgia Auto Show
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,006KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2011 Bill Crittenden
Green Street Cruise Night: June 6, 2011
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,859KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2011 Bill Crittenden
Green Street Cruise Night: June 6, 2011
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 3,177KB
Lincoln Continental Photo ©2011 Bill Crittenden
Green Street Cruise Night: June 6, 2011
View photo of Lincoln Continental - 4,115KB
Lincoln Continantel Badge spelled "Continantel"
Photo ©2012 Bill Crittenden
View photo of Lincoln Continantel - 3.1MB


Documents

DateDocument Name & DetailsDocuments
24 August 1953From: William T. Gossett, Ford Motor Company
To: Bentley Motors, Limited
Text & JPG - 1 page
classified date 1990Airbag Investigation
1989 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 19.1MB - 94 pages
classified date 1990Calspan Remote Air Bag Deployment Investigation
Fleet - 1990 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 469KB - 12 pages
classified date 1991On-Site Air Bag Investigation
1990 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 108MB - 284 pages
classified date 1995On-Site Air Bag Investigation
1990 Lincoln Continental, 4-door sedan
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 53.7MB - 305 pages
February 1996Veridian Remote Air Bag Related Driver Fatality Investigation
Vehicle: 1992 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 111KB - 10 pages
September 1997Calspan Air Bag Deployment Investigation
Passenger Side Air Bag Related Fatality
Vehicle #1 - 1992 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 500KB - 16 pages
classified date 1995Remote Air Bag Report
1994 Lincoln Continental Signature, four-door sedan
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 17.7MB - 161 pages
July 1997Calspan Remote Driver Air Bag Fatality Investigation
Vehicle: 1997 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 213KB - 11 pages
May 2006Calspan On-Site Driver Air Bag Related Fatality Investigation
Vehicle: 1997 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 331KB - 15 pages
August 1998Remote, Redesigned Air Bag Special Study
1998 Lincoln Continental
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 631KB - 11 pages
classified date 2000Special Crash Investigation Report
Case Vehicle: 1998 Lincoln Continental, 4-door sedan
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

PDF
- 47.2MB - 111 pages


Article Index

DateArticleAuthor/Source
21 October 1968Remarks Upon Accepting the New Presidential Limousine Commissioned by the Secret Service.President Lyndon B. Johnson


Merchandise

Box Art & Instructions

The Continental Mark II Scale Model (Ideal Model Kit)
1964 Lincoln Continental 3 in 1 Convertible Customizing Kit (AMT Model Kit)

Type & Item #NameDetails
Model Kit - Ideal 3712The Continental Mark II1:25 scale,
Model Kit - AMT 6414-1501964 Lincoln Continental 3 in 1 Convertible Customizing Kit1:25 scale, Customized by the Alexander Bros.,
Die Cast - Hot Wheels B3836-0714C G1Lincoln Continental 1964Cereal Crunchers, small scale, convertible, red w/Trix
Die Cast - Hot Wheels K6154-0917K D1'64 Lincoln Continental2007 New Models, small scale, metallic blue
Die Cast - Hot Wheels K6154-0917M D1'64 Lincoln Continental2007 New Models, small scale, metallic white
Die Cast - Hot Wheels K6154-0918C'64 Lincoln Continental2007 New Models, small scale, metallic white


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