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Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission

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Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission
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Wikipedia: Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission

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A public agency that operates bridges over the Delaware River connecting Pennsylvania & New Jersey. Several toll bridges subsidize other, non-toll bridges.

History

The following section is an excerpt from Wikipedia's Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission page on 8 September 2020, text available via the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission (DRJTBC) is a bistate, public agency that maintains and operates river crossings connecting the U.S. states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. The agency's jurisdiction stretches roughly 140 miles (230 km) along the Delaware River, from the Philadelphia/Bucks County, PA. boundary northward to the New Jersey/New York state line. The DRJTBC currently operates eight toll bridges and 12 toll-supported (free) bridges (two of which are pedestrian-only crossings), as well as 34 approach structures throughout its jurisdiction. Revenues from the eight toll bridges subsidize the other bridges. Since 1987, the commission has not received any state or federal tax revenues and relies solely on toll collections for its financing. In 2019, more than 138 million cars and trucks used the DRJTBC's network of Delaware River bridge crossings.

The DRJTBC was established under legislation enacted in the two states on December 18, 1934. The federal compact for the DRJTBC was first approved by Congress in 1935. The compact has been modified several times (on July 8, 1947, July 17, 1951, July 16, 1953, and March 19, 1986). In 1984 and 1985, the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey entered into the current version of the interstate compact, known as the "1984 agreement." This change was substantial as it meant that the DRJTBC no longer would receive tax dollars to maintain the commissions toll-supported bridges, known as tax-supported bridges until the 1984 agreement. This meant that the commission assumed full financial responsibility for their toll-free bridges. Later revisions also made it so that the DRJTBC could build the Interstate 78 Bridge over the Delaware River and operate it as a tolled crossing.


Documents

DateDocument Name & DetailsDocuments
7 August 1963
hearing dates
Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission
Hearing Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce
U.S. House of Representatives

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- 10.5MB - 54 pages


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