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Dictionary

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Language Resources
Automobiles Decoded - Dictionary - Poetry - General Quotations - Advertising Slogans

Other Definition Resources: Books
A Dictionary of Automobile Terms 1913 dictionary by The Horseless Age
English-French and French-English Dictionary of the Motor Car, Cycle, and Boat 1915 book
Automobile Nomenclature 1916 book of terminology by the Society of Automobile Engineers

Other Definition Resources: Articles
A Motor Car Lexicon. [Humor] Source: Tulsa Daily World, 25 April 1915
"PLEASURE CAR" AND "AUTO GAME" ARE BARRED BY AUTOMOBILE MEN Great Falls Daily Tribune, 11 January 1920
Hot Rod Lingo Source: Hot Rod Comics #4, August 1952
Learn to Speak Auto Designers’ Lingo Source: Anthony Fontanelle 2007

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This Dictionary is a collection of general automotive terms that are not specific enough to have a topic page created for them.  Not only are there current definitions, but also terms and definitions that have fallen out of usage presented here for historical perspective.

1-Box form  A categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the One-Box, also called a monospace or monovolume, it is a single continuous volume. Slight wedge formed front or rear are still generally placed in this category. e.g., Bus, original Ford Econoline. The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "1-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

107% rule  Often used in Formula One or other racing series, it is a time which the driver must qualify the car within 107% of the polesitter's time to be allowed to compete. Variations of this may be used to monitor drivers and warn them to make the required threshold of speed or be parked (disqualified). Similarly, the IndyCar Series uses a 105% rule and NASCAR has a 115% rule, mainly for performance on track, though INDYCAR and NASCAR often adjust the rule for tracks with very abrasive surfaces (such as Atlanta Motor Speedway) where lap times can be considerably faster when a car has newer tires. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

2-box form  A categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the Two-box form, there is usually a "box" representing a separate volume from the a-pillar forward and second box making up the rest. e.g., Station Wagon, Shooting-brake, Scion xB (2006) The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "2-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

3-box form  A categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the Three-box form, there is a "box" delineating a separate volume from the a-pillar forward, a second box comprising the passenger volume, and third box comprising the trunk area — e.g., a Sedan. The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "3-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

4-bolt main   A 4-bolt main refers to the number of bolts attaching the main bearing caps to the block of an internal combustion engine. Four bolt mains are considered much stronger for high performance use than a 2 bolt main. Using 4 bolts to secure the main bearing caps reduces the amount of flex within the crankshaft as compared to 2 bolts. The first car engine to use four-bolt main bearings was the V12 Maybach Zeppelin of 1928, that used them on three of its eight bearings.(Wikipedia: 4-bolt main)

A&A  (-politely- Aggravating Agitator): A CB user whose main purpose in life is to stir trouble and cause problems, usually under the influence of alcohol, and/or drugs. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

A-Bone  A hot rod built from a Ford Model A frame.

A-line  The line running over the car, from headlight to taillight, tracing the car's silhouette. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

adjustable foot  Part of detachable base that raises or lowers to allow a rear-facing car seat to be installed at the correct recline angle. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

advanced technology vehicle (ATV)  A vehicle that combines new engine/power/drivetrain systems to significantly improve fuel economy. This includes hybrid power systems and fuel cells, as well as some specialized electric vehicles. Source: USDOE 2012

advertising  A police car with its lights on. See "Blue Light Special." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

African Violet  An African-American truck stop prostitute. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

air jacks  Compressed air activated lifting cylinders strategically mounted to the frame of and near the wheels of a racing car which project downwards to lift the car off the ground during a pit stop so to more quickly change wheels/tires or provide mechanics access to the underside of the car for repairs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

aircraft carrier  Truck carrying a disassembled aircraft, helicopter or a small plane. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Alfisti  Plural, fans of Alfa Romeo.

Alice in Wonderland  Someone who is lost or seeking directions. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

all-in-one  This type of seat can change from a rear-facing car seat to a forward-facing car seat and then to a booster seat as a child grows. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

alligator  A large piece of a truck tire's tread in the roadway. The name comes from the tire tread's resemblance to the scaly ridges of an alligator's back, or the propensity for these pieces of tread to be drawn up between the cab and trailer by the air currents of a truck at highway speeds "like a snapping gator", and sever the air brake lines between the tractor and the trailer. Most newer trucks have shield plates designed to prevent this. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ambulette  Vehicles that transport people with disabilities or those with medical conditions. Ambulettes accept Medicaid, Medicare, and other private insurance for travel reimbursement to specific locations such as from a client’s home to a dialysis center and then back home. Ambulettes can take several clients, whereas ambulances, in general, hold one patient for transport to a hospital. Source: FHWA 2012

anchor clanker  Boat trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

anteater  A Kenworth T600 (T604 Australia) tractor, because of the long sloping tilt up hood. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

apex  The part of a corner where the racing line is nearest the inside of the bend. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

apron  An area of asphalt or concrete that separates the racing surface from the infield. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Armpit  New Jersey. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Art Bell Town  Pahrump, Nevada, Art Bell's hometown. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Assville  The city of Asheville, NC. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

astronaut  Police plane or helicopter. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

auto insurance  Insurance purchased by the owner of a vehicle to cover losses due to traffic accidents or theft. Synonyms:  motor insurance, car insurance (US English) Source: Wiktionary 2012

Automatic Drive  Automatic Drive was the trade name for Studebaker Corporation’s first automatic transmission, designed in conjunction with Borg-Warner's Detroit Gear division. Studebaker was one of two independent American auto manufacturers to invest in development and tooling for automatic transmissions, the other being Packard with its Ultramatic product. (Wikipedia: Automatic Drive)

automatic locking retractor  This is a type of retractor that provides the ability to "lock" the seat belt at a set position. This is an important piece when installing car seats. Check vehicle owner's manual for more information. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

automobile  A type of vehicle designed to move on the ground under its own stored power and intended to carry a driver, a small number of additional passengers, and a very limited amount of other load. A car or motorcar. Etymology: From French automobile, from Ancient Greek αὐτός (autós, “self”) + French mobile (“moving”), from Latin mobilis (“movable”). The word automobile implies a car with seating for perhaps four or five passengers. However, it may seat one, two, three, six, or more passengers. A vehicle with more than six or seven seats is usually described as a limousine, minivan, van, SUV, bus, etc. Synonyms: auto, car, motorcar. Adjective Form: automotive. (US/Canadian English) Source: Wiktionary 2012

Awful Awful  North American hot rod slang for a AA/FA ("double A" Fuel Altered) drag racer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

bōsōzoku   (暴走族) literally "running-out-of-control (as of a vehicle) tribe" is a Japanese youth subculture associated with customized motorcycles. (Bōsōzoku) Also used to describe a subculture of customized cars, combining five cultures of customized cars in Japan: Shakotan, Yanky style, VIP style, Kyusha style, and Grachan. (What is bosozoku?)

B-Main  A qualifying race before the main event, where non-qualified cars compete for a predetermined number of spots in the main event. Some races have a C-main where the top finisher(s) qualify for the B-main. At those events, the main event is known as the "A-main". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

baboon butt  A Kenworth T2000 tractor, because of the grille styling. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

baby bear  A rookie (or at least a very young) police officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Back Door  The area behind a vehicle or the last vehicle in a line. To say "I got your back door" means that someone is watching another's back. "Knocking at your back door" means approaching from behind. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

back half  (drag racing) Referring to distance from the 1/8 mile mark to the 1/4 mark of the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

backlight  The rear glass window glass. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

backmarker  A slower car, usually in the process of being lapped by the leaders. It is sometimes a derogatory term. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Bad News  Newport News, Virginia. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Badger Bound  Wisconsin bound. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bakkie  A generic South African term for light pickup truck. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

baldy  A tire from which the treads have worn away, leaving the carcass as smooth as a hairless man's head. (A Hot Rod Dictionary is Born)

band-aid buggy  Ambulance. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

banking  A.) The angle at which a track inclines towards the outside of a corner or from the lower to the higher side of a straight, also referred to as camber, more so when modest or negative, B.) a corner that inclines towards the outside or C.) an earth bank where spectators sit or stand. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

baquet  Refers to cars made in the early 1900s in Europe. Baquet means bath tub. These cars had two rows of raised seats similar to horse-drawn carriages. Baquets usually did not have front doors, a top, or windshield. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

barchetta  Italian term for a roadster with no roof. The name, roughly "small boat", comes from an exclamation when the Ferrari 166MM Touring was shown. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Barf City  Providence, Rhode Island. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Barnyard Buick  A Navistar International truck (formerly International Harvester). The terms originated because the International Harvester Company was primarily known for their farm machinery. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Batsman's Crease  A tangent break feature line running along the centreline of a car. This kind of feature can be seen on many modern Vauxhall, Opel and Chrysler models. Literally derived from the break found on the rear side of a cricket bat. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

bead  Tire bead is the term for the edge of a tire that sits on the wheel. Wheels for automobiles, bicycles, etc. are made with a small slot or groove into which the tire bead sits. When the tire is properly inflated the air pressure within the tire keeps the bead in this groove. It is common amongst drivers of off-road vehicles to decrease the air pressure in their tires. This makes the tread of the tire spread out, creating more surface area for the tire's tread to grip the terrain. If the pressure is too low, there may not be enough pressure to keep the bead on the wheel, thus causing the bead to pop off the wheel; this is often referred to as "losing a bead". Beadlocks, which clamp the bead on the wheel, are often used in this case. Often, the bead can become frozen to the rim after rusting occurs, requiring the use of a bead breaker. (Wikipedia: Tire bead)

beam  (drag racing) Starting line electric eye controlling prestaged and staged lights. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Bean Town  Boston, Massachusetts. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bean  A Ford Pinto. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear bait  An erratic or speeding driver. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear bite  A speeding ticket. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bear Cave/Bear's Den/Bear's Lair  A police station. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear in a plain brown wrapper  A law officer in an unmarked police car. The term "plain white wrapper" is sometimes used, depending on the color of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear in the air  A police aircraft. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear in the grass  A speed trap. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear taking pictures  Police with radar. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear with ears  A police officer listening to others on the CB. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bear  A police officer. The terms "Smokey" & "Bear" are both direct references to Smokey Bear, a character image commonly seen along U.S. highways, as part of warnings not to cause wildfires. He wears a campaign hat very similar to that included in many highway patrol uniforms in the U.S. It also refers to their attitude toward most law enforcement officers in general. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bed cap  A camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)

beemer  Slang for a BMW motorcycle or car.

Beertown  Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bells and flags  A bell is when the dispatcher calls on the radio and sends a driver for a pickup. A flag is when someone on the street flags you down. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

belt path  This is the place on a car seat or booster seat where a seat belt or lower anchor attachment is placed to secure car seat in vehicle. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

belt-positioning booster seat  See booster seat. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

beltline  The line going from the hood which usually follows the bottom edge of the windows and continues to the trunk. The beltline is a major component of the vehicle's overall appearance, as well as the safety aspect of blind spots. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

berlina  Italian term for a sedan. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

berline  French term for a sedan. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

berlinetta  Italian term for a sport coupé. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

bezel  The trim or bodywork that surrounds a light, holds the face of an instrument in position, or decoratively conceals gaps between bodywork and components as an escutcheon. Often chrome or plastic. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Bibendum  The official name of Michelin's mascot, commonly known in English as The Michelin Man.

Big A  Atlanta, Georgia or Amarillo, Texas. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big Apple  New York City. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big Arch  St. Louis, Missouri (named for the Gateway Arch). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big Easy, The  New Orleans, Louisiana (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big One, The  A large pileup during a stock car race involving up to 30 cars. The term is largely reserved for restrictor plate racing at Daytona and Talladega. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Big Orange  Skelton Truck Lines Truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big R  Roadway Express truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big Road, The  An interstate, particularly Interstate-80. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big Stink, The  Las Cruces, New Mexico (Due to its waste water treatment plant being to close to I-10). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Big Truck  A semi truck, usually an 18-wheeler, used as the opposite of the term "four-wheeler." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Biggest Little  Reno, Nevada (named for its nickname "Biggest Little City in the World"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bikini State  Florida (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bimmer  Slang for a BMW car.

binders  Air brakes. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

binnacle  The housing for the Instrument cluster on top of or as part of the dashboard. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Bit By A Bear  Received a ticket. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bitumen sniffer  A Kenworth T604, T608, or T609. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Black and White  Highway Patrol. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Black Bart  A chronic alcoholic who cannot handle his liquor. Usually shouts loudly, picking people up, etc. A general nuisance to others. An undesirable person at a party or truckstop. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

black flagged  To be ordered to the pits or penalty box, due to a rules infraction or unsafe car (loose parts, smoking, dropping fluid, etc). A black flag is shown to the car that has to stop. Also known as "being posted". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

bleach box  (drag racing) Area where bleach is deposited for cars to perform burnouts (q.v). Gasoline (since discontinued for safety reasons), water, and TrackBite are also used. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

blend line  The painted line defining the exit from pit lane where it rejoins the race track. It prevents emerging race cars from driving into race traffic travelling past the pits. Competitors are penalised for crossing the blend line, ensuring cars have attained full racing speed before rejoining the race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

blinders  High beams (headlights). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bling  (contemporary) See brightwork. May also refer to the strong use of jeweled lighting. Comes from the term bling-bling. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

blinkin' winkin'  School bus. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

blood box  Ambulance. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

blowover  Flipping of a car or boat, due to air under car lifting front wheels. Commonly suffered by dragsters and powerboats. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Blue Bear  A Michigan State Police Trooper. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Blue Bird  A Marten Transport truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Blue Light Special  A law enforcement vehicle, especially with a stopped motorist. The term blue light special is derived from a promotion by Kmart where they would place a flashing blue light in the store next to an item, and announce a surprise sale to shoppers on the store's public address system. Truckers adopted the term and announce a "Blue Light Special" on the CB to warn other truckers when they spot a police vehicle with flashing blue lights on the road. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bluegrass City  Lexington, Kentucky and surrounding area. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bluff, The  Poplar Bluff, Missouri. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bob-tail  A semi-tractor operating without a trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

boda boda  A motorcycle taxi in Uganda.

body box  Ambulance. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Body in White  Base chassis before customisation. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

bogie  Threat. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bone box  Ambulance. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bonnet  The hatch covering the engine on vehicles when the engine is located forward or aft of the passenger compartment. The equivalent word in American English is "hood." (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

booster seat  A booster seat correctly positions the seat belt by "boosting" the child so the lap and shoulder belts fit properly. The lap belt should be low and tight across the hips, and the shoulder belt should fit cross the chest and not rest against the neck or face. Proper belt fit is very important. Booster seats can have high backs (for use in vehicles with no head restraints) or can be no back/backless seats (for use in vehicles with head restraints). (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

boot  (Trunk outside of the UK) Compartment for storage of cargo which is separate from the cab. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

bottle  (drag racing) Refers to the nitrous system, also the jug. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

bottoming out  When the bottom of the chassis hits the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

box box box  An F1 term used by people on the pit wall to tell a driver to come into the pitlane for a pitstop. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

box cap  A camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)

Boy Scouts  State Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

brake check  A brief traffic slowdown, where traffic flow improves after about a minute or two. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

brake lights  Red steady-burning rear lights, brighter than the rear position lamps, are activated when the driver applies the vehicle's brakes. These are called stop lamps in some countries and brake lights in others. They are required to be fitted in multiples of two, symmetrically at the left and right edges of the rear of every vehicle. International UN regulations specify a range of acceptable intensity for a stop lamp of 60 to 185 candela. In North America where the UN regulations are not recognised, the acceptable range for a single-compartment stop lamp is 80 to 300 candela. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

break  French term for a station wagon. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

breaker  Telling other CB users that you'd like to start a transmission on a channel. May be succeeded by either the channel number, indicating that anyone may acknowledge (e.g. "Breaker One-nine" refers to channel 19, the most widely used among truck drivers), or by a specific "handle", which is requesting a particular individual to respond. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

breakout  (drag racing) Running quicker than dial-in; also "breaking out." Grounds for disqualification if opponent does not commit a foul start or cross boundary lines; also known as Bustout. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Breezeway  In automotive design terminology, the name breezeway has been used to describe the reverse-slanted, power-operated rear window ("backlite") which, when opened even slightly, provided through ventilation. Typical models with this feature are late-1950s Mercury Turnpike Cruisers and Park Lanes. (Wikipedia: Breezeway)

Bridgeville  Portland, Oregon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

brightwork  Anything reflective added to a car to enhance appearance. May also be called chrome. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

Britstang  Slang for a right-hand-drive Ford Mustang.

Bubble City  Champaign, Illinois. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bubblegummer  Teenager. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bucket  (also wheel well) The enclosure or space for the wheel. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

buckle  Accepts the latch plate and holds the seat belt in place. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

buggy  A Buggy is an automobile with wheels that project beyond the vehicle body. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Buick town  Flint, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bull City  Washington, D.C. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bull rack  Livestock truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bulldog  A Mack Tractor, noted for the bulldog hood ornament. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Bullfrog  An ABF truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bump and run  A move in stock car racing, where a trailing car intentionally bumps the car in front in an attempt to pass. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

bumper sticker  A tailgating vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bumper  A bumper is a structure attached to or integrated with the front and rear ends of a motor vehicle, to absorb impact in a minor collision, ideally minimizing repair costs. Invented by Briton Frederick Simms in 1901, Bumpers ideally minimize height mismatches between vehicles and protect pedestrians from injury. Regulatory measures have been enacted to reduce vehicle repair costs, and more recently impact on pedestrians. (Wikipedia: Bumper)

Bundy tube  Bundy tube, sometimes called Bundy pipe, is type of double-walled low-carbon steel tube manufactured by rolling a copper-coated steel strip through 720 degrees and resistance brazing the overlapped seam in a process called Bundywelding. It may be zinc- or terne- coated for corrosion protection. It is used in automotive hydraulic brake lines in cars manufactured in the USA since the 1930s. A 1969 study by the SAE recommended the replacement of Bundy tube with 90-10 copper-nickel alloy UNS C70600 (Kunifer pipe) because of corrosion concerns. Kunifer pipe has since been adopted by European automakers Volvo, Rolls-Royce, Lotus Cars, Aston-Martin, Porsche, and Audi. Bundy pipe retains the advantage higher rigidity, which means less volume expansion under pressure. The Bundy Tubing Company, started in the USA, was bought in the 1980s by what is now the British company TI Automotive. (Wikipedia: Bundy tube)

Bunsen Burner  Portable meth lab. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

burnout  Performed to heat the tires up for better traction. It is also used in stock car racing typically to celebrate a race win. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Buschwhacker  (NASCAR) A driver who regularly races in the first tier NASCAR series, the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, who makes guest or semi-regular appearances racing in the second-tier NASCAR Xfinity Series. The term was named originally for then sponsor of the second-tier series Anheuser-Busch brewery. Claim Jumper was a reference to second-tier sponsor Nationwide Insurance (2008–14), and Signal Pirate references current second-tier sponsor Comcast Xfinity. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Buschwhacker  A slang term for a NASCAR Winston Cup/Nextel Cup driver who competed in, and often dominated a race in, the NASCAR Busch Series.

Buster Brown  A United Parcel Service (UPS) truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

busy  A Weigh Station or Rest Area that is pulling trucks in for weighing or inspection. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Buzzard Truck  A Stevens Transport truck, because the birds on the truck all face the same direction as if flying in a circle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

bye  Allows a driver to advance to the next stage or heat of an event, without competing, when there are uneven numbers entered. Commonly used in speedway, drag racing and drifting etc. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Byteflight  Byteflight is an automotive databus created by BMW and partners Motorola, Elmos Semiconductor and Infineon to address the need for a modernized safety-critical, fault tolerant means of electronic communication between automotive components. It is a message oriented protocol. As a predecessor to FlexRay, byteflight uses a hybrid synchronous/asynchronous TDMA based means of data transfer to circumvent deficiencies associated with pure event-triggered databuses. (Wikipedia: Byteflight)

cab back  The cab of the vehicle is moved to the rear of the vehicle. Cars such as a 1970s Corvette could be considered cab back design. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

cab forward  The cab of the vehicle is pushed forward. This design aesthetic was popular with Chrysler in the 1990s with the introduction of their LH platform cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

cab-over  Tractors designed with the cab directly over the engine. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cab  Short for cabin. The enclosed compartment of a vehicle which contains the driver and passengers. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

cabbie  A taxicab driver.

cabrio coach  A cabrio coach or semi-convertible is a type of car that has a retractable textile roof, and derives from Cabriolet. It is an inexpensive alternative to a full convertible, especially on cars with unibody designs since little or no redesign of the body is necessary. This type of roof was popular in Germany in the 1930s, and is often called a "Webasto" since a German company of that name has been the main supplier for both factory built, and aftermarket, cloth car roofs since that time. This roof was used on many older cars such as the Mercedes-Benz Ponton, Saab 92, Citroën 2CV, Fiat 500, GAZ-M20 Pobeda and the Fuldamobil. Nash Rambler was available as a cabrio coach, but they called it "convertible landau". A variant in which the original sedan's fixed rear glass window was retained first appeared in the 1930s, and had the advantage that it could be more easily retrofitted to an existing car; it was a factory option (although listed as a separate model) for the Volkswagen Beetle up to 1963. Some more modern cars also feature this roof style, for instance BMW 318ti, Volkswagen Polo, Nissan Figaro, Isuzu Amigo, Fiat 500 (2007) and Suzuki Vitara. (Wikipedia: Cabrio coach)

cabrio coach  Normally a two-door body design with special form of car roof, where a retractable textile cover amounts to a large sunroof. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

cabriolet  Orignally the French term for convertible, it is now frequently used across many languages, as in the German-made Volkswagen Cabriolet. (French)

cackle fest  A.) (Drag Racing) Referring to when 2 Top Fuel or Funny Car cars are sitting at the starting line and one or both cars refuse to stage. The motor noise at idle sounds like a cackle. At the discretion of the starter, they can order the drivers to stage or even have them pull out of the lanes and have the next race group come forward. Or B.) A show and shine for hot rods where the cars are allowed to idle. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

cage driver  A motorcyclists' slang term for drivers of cars. The A-, B-, and C-pillars from a structure that resembles the "cage" and implies that car drivers aren't free.

camber  A.) The angle at which wheels are set up to tilt in or out, measured in degrees in or out from 90 degrees (i.e. "2.5 degrees negative camber" means each wheel is tilted 2.5 degrees inwards from vertical) "Positive camber" means the top of the tyre is angled outwards from the car; "negative camber" means that the top tilts inwards. Negative camber assists cornering performance as the outside tyres lean into the corner (like a motorcycle) which keeps the lateral forces on the tire lower and causes less flex in the sidewall, although it does also have the effect of increasing tyre wear. Or B.) Banking, the angle at which a corner inclines towards the outside or a straight from its lower side to its higher side. Sometimes specified as positive camber and negative camber, the latter indicating a decline from the inside of a corner. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Camel City  Winston-Salem, NC (the home of Reynolds Tobacco). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

camera car  Highway Patrol Police Car in reference to the onboard video camera set up. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

camera  Police radar unit. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

camioneta  Brazilian Portuguese term for a station wagon (specially in the state of Rio de Janeiro). Spanish term also used in Argentina and Uruguay. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

camper shell  A camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)

Canadian Peterbilt  Western Star Truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Canadian Turnpike, The  Name give to Interstate-81 because of its heavy Canadian truck traffic. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

candy car  Highway Patrol Police Car usually with high-visibility Police decals. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cap  A camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)

Capital City  Carson City, Nevada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

car bed  A restraint, usually for small, premature, or medically fragile babies who should ride lying down either on their backs or on their stomachs. In most cases, the baby lies flat. The vehicle seat belt is used to anchor the car bed perpendicular to the direction of travel. The infant's head is placed toward the center of the vehicle and not next to the door. An internal harness secures the child in the car bed. Be sure to carefully read the manufacturer’s instructions as there may be other methods of securing allowed for certain car beds. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

car seat  A child restraint (CR), a child restraint system (CRS), or a child restraint device (CRD): A crash-tested seat, device or system that is specially designed to provide child crash protection. General terms for these systems include child safety seats, car seats, boosters or booster seats, vests or car beds, and those items which meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 213. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Care Bear  Police car located within a construction zone. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

caregiver  A person responsible for a child's well-being and safety. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

carrinha  Portuguese term for a station wagon. Not used in Brazilian Portuguese. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

carry handle  Plastic handle attached to infant car seats (rear-facing only) that can be used to carry car seat with child in it when removed from vehicle. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Carson top  Carson top is a one-piece, padded, upholstered, removable top. The design was invented by Bob Houser in 1935 when he worked for Amos Carson at Carson Top Shop in Los Angeles, USA. The first carson top was probably made for a Ford Model A convertible and nowadays it is mostly used on hot rods and customs. (Wikipedia: Carson top)

caruggy  A "caruggy" or tarapopp is a specialized off-road vehicle. Caruggy is a portmanteau of the words car and buggy. Some people think that the caruggy nomenclature is derived from using a car frame as the basis for the vehicle, whereas a "buggy" would have started from the chassis of a Volkswagen Bug. Actually the "caruggy" is the "unlimited class", full tube chassis brainchild of Tim Lawrence (TLR Performance Fabrication) of El Cajon, Ca. With the help of Travis Rojas (the co driver). It is a morph between a "Trophy car" and a "Race Buggy". It is simply put, a giant front engined race buggy, like a car. Race buggies were historically rear engine. Caruggy are built for off-road racing. They are built at specialty shops that know and understand the rules of the racing classes. Popular racing series that include these vehicles are the Baja 1000, Baja 500, The Mint 400, the 1400-mile Vegas to Reno, etc. Caruggies are built from scratch, not heavily modified street vehicles that have been altered to the point that they barely resemble their original form. A caruggy generally has several defining features: (Wikipedia: Truggy)

Carwash  A Department of Homeland Security program for mobile application testing hosted by DHS OCIO.

cash box  A toll booth or toll plaza. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

catalytic converter  A catalytic converter is an emissions control device that converts toxic gases and pollutants in exhaust gas to less toxic pollutants by catalyzing a redox reaction (an oxidation and a reduction reaction). Catalytic converters are used with internal combustion engines fueled by either petrol (gasoline) or diesel—including lean-burn engines. The first widespread introduction of catalytic converters was in the United States automobile market. To comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's stricter regulation of exhaust emissions, most gasoline-powered vehicles starting with the 1975 model year must be equipped with catalytic converters. (Wikipedia: Catalytic converter)

catch car  Police car past radar set-up. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

catch fence  A series of and combination of chain-link fencing, welded grid fencing, and / or cables used to slow or stop out of control cars and prevent debris and tyres from hitting the crowd. It is common on short tracks, street and permanent circuits. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

cattle wagon  Livestock truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

center cap  A center cap, or centercap is a decorative disk on an automobile wheel that covers a central portion of the wheel. Early center caps for automobiles were small and primarily served the purpose of keeping dirt away from the spindle nut and wheel bearings of vehicles. Center caps are often found on new cars to hide the lug nuts, and/or the bearing. Center caps are a type of hubcap, the other primary type being wheel covers. Some modern center caps are retained to the wheel using spring clips, while others are retained by the wheel lugs or other threaded fasteners. (Wikipedia: Center cap)

center console  The center console (British English: centre console) in an automobile refers to the control-bearing surfaces in the center of the front of the vehicle interior. The term is applied to the area beginning in the dashboard and continuing beneath it, and often merging with the transmission tunnel which runs between the front driver's and passenger's seats of many vehicles. Traditionally, vehicles with a gear stick have placed this control where the two areas of console and tunnel merge, or at the rear-most end of the console in front-wheel-drive vehicles without transmission tunnels. In some modern vehicles – particularly vans – the gear stick is mounted in the front, more vertical part of the center console to be within better reach of the driver without requiring a long stalk mounted on the steering column. The term "center console" often extends, as well, to the armrest between the driver's and passenger's seats, which in some vehicles (e.g., the Toyota RAV4) features one or more storage compartments under the armrest. (Wikipedia: Center console (automobile))

channel 4 drunk  A chronic alcoholic who spends an extreme amount of time on the CB radio. Interchangeable with the terms Silverfish, Buck, Kool-Aid Man, or Leadfoot. Derived from the Channel Four CB club in Concord, North Carolina. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

channel  To modify the body so that it can be dropped below the frame. (A Hot Rod Dictionary is Born)

character line  A line creased into the side of a car to give it visual interest. (interchangeable with swage line) Sometimes implemented by a rubbing strip. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Charlie Town  Charleston, South Carolina. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

chase vehicle  In off-road racing, a non-competitive vehicle that follows a competing vehicle to assist with repairs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

checking my eyelids for pinholes  Saying "I'm tired." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Checkpoint Charlie  Old CB slang for a police checkpoint placed to look for drunk drivers, etc. This looks like a roadblock. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cheese wagon  A school bus. See also "Swiss Cheese Wagon", "Half Cheese", "Little Cheese". (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

chest clip  Plastic buckle or clasp that holds the harness shoulder straps together over the child’s chest and is positioned at child’s armpit level. Also called retainer clip. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Chi-Town  Chicago, Illinois. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

chicane  An artificial feature added to the natural course of a track to slow cars or create a passing zone. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

chicken choker  Poultry truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

chicken coop  A weigh station. "Locked up" / "clean" (ex: "the chicken coop is clean.") means the station is closed. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Chief Hood Lifter  Service Manager at a truck repair garage. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

children with special transportation needs  Children whose physical or behavioral conditions sometimes make the use of specially designed restraint systems necessary. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Chocolate Town  Hershey, Pennsylvania. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

choke and puke  Roadside diner (named for the poor quality of food at some establishments). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Choo Choo Town  Chattanooga, Tennessee (named for the song "Chattanooga Choo-Choo"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Christmas Tree  The series of lights in drag racing that signal the approach and start of a race in addition to showing starting violations. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

chrome  Brightwork using chrome plating. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

church break  A compulsory time-off period in which all motorsport activities must cease for a short period on late Sunday morning to allow church services to proceed without disruption from adjacent noise, common to all motorsport venues taking place within a certain proximity of a church, or if local regulations mandate such. At Lime Rock Park, racing on Sunday is specifically prohibited. Some series intentionally do not allow any activity on the circuit until after noon on Sunday. Many series in North America reserve such time off in order to have chapel services inside the circuit, organised by a ministry traveling with the series, and spectators with chapel services organised by local churches. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

church on wheels  A church bus. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Cigar City  Tampa, Florida. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Circle  Indianapolis, Indiana. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Circus Wagon  Monfort truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

City Bear/City Kitty  Local law enforcement monitoring a particular stretch of interstate which runs through their jurisdiction. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

city car  A city car is a small automobile intended for use in urban areas. Unlike microcars, a city car's greater speed, capacity and (in perception at least) occupant protection are safer in mixed traffic environments and weather conditions. While city cars can reach highway speeds, that is not their intended use. In Japan, city cars are called kei cars. Kei cars have to meet strict size and engine requirements: engines have a maximum displacement of 660 cc and the car's length must be under 3400 mm. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

cladding  Material (usually plastic) added to exterior of the car which isn't structurally necessary. May be functional to keep out dirt/debris as in underbody cladding, or may be cosmetic. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

Claim Jumper  (NASCAR) A driver who regularly races in the first tier NASCAR series, the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, who makes guest or semi-regular appearances racing in the second-tier NASCAR Xfinity Series. The term was named originally for then sponsor of the second-tier series Anheuser-Busch brewery. Claim Jumper was a reference to second-tier sponsor Nationwide Insurance (2008–14), and Signal Pirate references current second-tier sponsor Comcast Xfinity. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

classy chassis  Nice truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

clean air  Air that has not been affected by turbulence from other cars. The opposite of dirty air. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

clean and green  No police or obstructions ahead. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Clerk of the Course  The official responsible for all on-track activities including demonstrations and parades. They oversee the track conditions, supervise the marshals and emergency services, control the deployment of the safety car and decide upon suspending a session. If a race director is appointed the clerk is junior and the race director has ultimate authority; if not they are often the most senior official at a racing event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

closing the door  A driver takes an early defensive racing line into a corner to block the car behind from overtaking along the preferred line. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

co-driver  In rally racing, a co-driver directs the driver through the course by reading pacenotes which describe the turns and obstacles ahead. Also called a navigator historically when the reading of maps played a larger part in rallies prior to the widespread adoption of pacenoting. The term is also used in long-distance sports car and touring car racing where more than one driver is sharing the same vehicle. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

coal rolling  see Rollin' Coal

Cocaine Cowboy  Drug Enforcement Police, usually used when a car is pulled over and being searched. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Colorado Cadillac  Jeep Grand Wagoneer. The Wagoneer was very popular in Colorado in the 70s, and 80s and more were sold there than in any other state. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

coloring book/comic book  A trucker's log book. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Combi Coupé  A 2-door, 4-seat car with hatchback door at rear and, collapsible rear seats, resembling a fastback. The idea is to maximize the carrying capacity without bargaining on the performance. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

combination seat  A type of forward-facing car seat that is used with an internal harness system to secure a child. With removal of the internal harness, it is used as a belt-positioning booster. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

come back  A request for someone to acknowledge a transmitted message or reply to a question. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

comedian  The median between a divided highway. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

commercial company  Prostitute who hangs out on the radio, usually around truck stops. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

compact car  Small family/compact cars refer to the hatchbacks and shortest saloons and estate cars with similar size. They are approximately 4,250 mm (167 in) long in case of hatchbacks and 4,500 mm (177 in) in the case of saloons and estate cars. Compact cars have room for five adults and usually have engines between 1.4 and 2.2 litres, but some have engines of up to 2.5 litres. Some early "muscle" compacts had optional V8 engines of up to 6.6 liters. These are the most popular vehicles in most developed countries. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

compact executive car  These are luxurious equivalents to mid-size and compact cars. Rear seat room and trunk space are smaller than executive cars simply because of their smaller overall size. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

competition caution  A preplanned full course yellow, mandated by the sanctioning body, where drivers bring their vehicles into the pits. Frequently done to change tires because of excessive tire wear. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

component speaker  A component speaker is a car audio speaker matched for optimal sound quality. Typically a pair of tweeters and mid-bass drivers are matched with a crossover to limit the frequency range each speaker must accurately reproduce. Component speakers drivers are physically separated so the tweeter, which is very directional, can be placed in an optimal position, usually on the dash facing the listener, while the larger mid-bass driver can be placed where there is room, often in the lower front of the car doors. Component speaker pairs are offered by all of the high-end audio manufacturers. (Wikipedia: Component speaker)

compression space  An older term for combustion chamber. (Automobile Catechism, 1910)

control panel  Generally used in a Car/Truck for heating and cooling inside car environment according to the passenger requirements. Basically it is divided into Different modes, Blower speed functions, AC, Temperature, Fresh recirculation of air. Worldwide control panel manufacturers are BHTC, Delphi, Visteon, Valeo, etc. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

control  Where the series organisers specify that all competitors in the race must use an identical part; as in control tyre or control engine. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

convertible seat  A car seat that converts from rear-facing for babies and smaller children to forward-facing for older and larger children. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

convertible  A body design that features a flexibly operating roof for open or enclosed mode driving. Also known as a cabriolet or roadster (if a 2-seater). Historically, convertibles used folding roof structures with fabric or other flexible materials. Some designs have roofs made of metal or other stiff materials that retract into the body. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

convict wagon  Prison Transport used by the Department Of Corrections, named after the caged wagons used to haul convicts to prison and/or to executions in the US in the 19th century. Usually it is a large bus that is the size of a standard city bus, painted white, has the D.O.C. markings on it, state or Federal markings on it as well. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

convoy  A group of 3 or more truckers in a line, usually exceeding the speed limit. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Coon Town  Albany, Georgia or the rural south Georgia and rural south Alabama area. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Cop Shop  Police station. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

corn flaker  Consolidated Freight Lines truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cornbinder  A Navistar International truck (formerly International Harvester). The terms originated because the International Harvester Company was primarily known for their farm machinery. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Cornfield Cadillac  A John Deere tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Counciltucky  Council Bluffs, Iowa. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

County Mountie  A Sheriff's deputy car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

coupé convertible  Also retractable hardtop or Coupé Cabriolet. A type of convertible forgoing a foldable textile roof in favor of a multi-segment rigid roof retracts into the lower bodywork. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Coupé utility  A passenger-car derived vehicle with an integral exterior cargo area. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

coupé  A 2-door, 2- or 4-seat car with a fixed roof. Its doors are often longer than those of an equivalent sedan and the rear passenger area smaller; the roof may also be low. In cases where the rear seats are very small and not intended for regular use it is called a 2+2 (pronounced "two plus two"). Originally, a coupé was required to have only one side window per side, but this consideration has not been used for many years. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

covered wagon  A trailer that resembles a Covered Wagon of the old west, normally used for carrying steel rolls. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Cow Town  Fort Worth, Texas, Dodge City, Kansas, Columbus, Ohio and Calgary, Alberta. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Cowboy Cadillac  Coupé utility vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cowl  The base of the windshield. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Crashville  Nashville, Tennessee. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

crate motor  An engine that is ready-built and sealed by an independent company. Crate motors are sometimes mandated and sometimes optional. They are commonly used in regional touring series down to local tracks in divisions from late models on down. Crate motors are implemented to limit costs and it ensures that the entire field has the same equipment. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Creeper Cop  Department of Transportation or Commercial Vehicle Enforcement officer so named because of the use of wheeled creepers when inspecting trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Crest/Crust  CRST truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

crossed sticks  Two curled up flags held out in form of a cross signal the halfway mark in many American racing series. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

crossmember  A crossmember is a structural section, usually of steel, usually boxed, that is bolted across the underside of a monocoque / unibody motor vehicle, to support the internal combustion engine and / or transmission. For the suspension of any car to operate as it should, for proper handling, and to keep the body panels in alignment, the frame has to be strong enough to cope with the loads applied to it. It must not deflect, and it has to have enough torsional strength to resist twisting. A "K" member is a crossmember in a vehicle with a longitudinally-mounted engine, contains the engine mounts. (Wikipedia: Crossmember)

crossover SUV  Crossover SUVs are derived from an automobile platform using a monocoque construction with light off-road capability and lower ground clearance than SUVs. They may be styled similar to conventional "off-roaders", or may be look similar to an estate car or station wagon. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

crotch-rocket cowboy  An individual on a sport bike (motorcycle) riding recklessly. Usually used as a warning to other drivers to watch for erratic behavior. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Cub Scouts  Sheriffs' Deputies. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cub  A rookie (or at least a very young) police officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

curbstoning  car dealers who sell as private individuals instead of as a dealership to gain the confidence of a customer. Can also refer to licensed dealers selling away from their lots or private individuals who sell for a living but don't have a license or a lot.

Curve, The  I-90 & I-39 interchange; I-90 turn north at Rockford, Illinois. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

cushion  In dirt or off-road racing, when dirt is kicked up from the track that lands near the wall after trucks drift through the corners. The dirt builds up after time and can slow a driver down if they slide too deep into it while sliding through the turn. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

customer car  When a racing team uses a car built for them, either by another team, or by a specialist racing chassis manufacturer. Primarily a Formula One term where the majority of teams build their own cars. The practice has since been banned from F1. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

cyclecar  A small four-wheeled automobile produced in the 1910's and 1920's, so named for their use of small motorcycle engines and wheels. Some two-seat cyclecars were narrower than regular automobiles and had tandem seating, one behind the other.

cylinder head  In an internal combustion engine, the cylinder head (often informally abbreviated to just head) sits above the cylinders on top of the cylinder block. It closes in the top of the cylinder, forming the combustion chamber. This joint is sealed by a head gasket. In most engines, the head also provides space for the passages that feed air and fuel to the cylinder, and that allow the exhaust to escape. The head can also be a place to mount the valves, spark plugs, and fuel injectors. (Wikipedia: Cylinder head)

Da Puke  Dubuque, Iowa. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

damn-it-driver  An interjection indicating surprise (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

dash kit  A self-adhesive applique kit that contains a number of accent trim pieces designed specifically for a vehicle model, make and year. Available either in vinyl or domed polyurethane versions. Manufactured by companies such as Rvinyl.com, Sherwood Dash and B&I Trims. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

dash-to-axle ratio  The critical relationship between front wheel centers and the windshield base. The most notable differences can be seen between cars with front-engine, front-wheel drive layout and front mid-engine, rear-wheel drive layout: the former tend to have longer front overhangs with a smaller dash-to-axle ratios, while the latter have shorter front overhangs with much greater dash-to-axle. Most so called premium vehicles (equipped with rear wheel drive) feature a relatively long dash-to-axle ratio. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

dashboard dining  Slang for someone eating in their car, particularly while driving.

Dashboard Puppy  Radar Detector or other portable monitor (usually with an audible alarm). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

dashcam  A dash cam, dashboard camera, car DVR, or car black box is an onboard camera that continuously records the view through a vehicle's windscreen. It may be attached to the interior windscreen or to the top of the dashboard, by suction cup or adhesive-tape mount. Dashcams may provide video evidence in the event of a road accident. During parking, some dashcams still can capture video evidence if vandalism act is detected. (Wikipedia: Dashcam)

daylight opening  (DLO) US DOT Term: For openings on the side of the vehicle, other than a door opening, the locus of all points where a horizontal line, perpendicular to the vehicle longitudinal centerline, is tangent to the periphery of the opening. US DOT Term: For openings on the front and rear of the vehicle, other than a door opening, daylight opening means the locus of all points where a horizontal line, parallel to the vehicle longitudinal centerline is tangent to the periphery of the opening. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

dead-heading  A truck operating with an empty trailer (see "Hauling fence post holes"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

deck  The horizontal surface at the rear of the car, which usually serves as the trunk lid. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

deep braking  Applying the brakes later than normal when entering a turn. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

deflection  Similar to "smuggling" in taxi slang. Driver makes up an excuse for refusing a call (which riles the cab company owner to no end). Examples include flat tires, returning a forgotten cell phone (or medication or a hat) to a customer. Sometimes a driver will simply ignore the radio. He'll call in later asking if dispatch has been trying to reach him, then apologize for accidentally having his radio volume too low. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

Delaware start  A style of restart where the race leader starts in the first row by himself and the other drivers start two-wide. Named after a start method for a short track in the state of Delaware in the United States. The leader can choose which lane he wants for the restart, which can be an advantage, with a clear advantage over second place. Compare that to Lane Choice. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

delta time  The entire time it generally takes a driver to enter the pit lane, make a full pit stop, and exit the pit area back to the track to resume racing at optimum pace. For example, a Delta Time of 25 seconds means the entire pitting process (entering, stopping and exiting) cost the driver 25 seconds not driving at full race speed even though the car may have been stationary in the pit box for only 5 seconds. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

density altitude  (drag racing) Refers to the quality of air. Technically "quality of air" refers to the pressure drop as altitude above sea level increases. Atmospheric air pressure is lower at a race track higher above sea level. All non-turbocharged internal combustion engines produce less power as air pressure drops, as each intake stroke draws in less air per volume than normally. This may require the engine to be "tuned" to optimize the power, as it may still "think" it's at a lower altitude. Because a supercharged engine pressurizes intake air at a fixed mechanical ratio to the engines RPM's, it suffers a proportionate loss in power, but not as severe as a naturally aspirated engine will. A turbocharged engine is largely unaffected, as the lower density of the intake air is offset by the lower backpressure resisting the exhaust flow through the turbo. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Derby City  Louisville, Kentucky, home of the Kentucky Derby. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

detachable base  A separate base for a rear-facing only car seat that can be installed in the vehicle. The car seat portion can be removed from the base and used as a carrier. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Detroit Vibrator  A a Chevrolet truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Detroit  A diesel engine manufactured by the Detroit Diesel Corporation. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Detroit agate  Also known as Fordite or Motor Agate, is old automobile paint which has hardened sufficiently to be cut and polished. It was formed from the buildup of layers of enamel paint slag on tracks and skids on which cars were hand spray-painted (a now automated process), which have been baked numerous times. In recent times the material has been upcycled into eco-friendly jewelry. (Wikipedia: Fordite) The layers formed from the frequent changing of paint colors resemble a kind of bright rainbow sandstone.

deuce coupe  A 1932 Ford Model B coupe.

deuce-and-a-half  Army terminology for a 2 1/2 ton truck.

dial-in  (drag racing) When bracket racing, drivers must estimate or "dial in" the time in which they expect to run. Therefore, two unmatched cars in weight and power can compete, by a handicap system. If one runs a faster time than dialed in, it is a breakout. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

did not attend  (DNA) Denotes a driver who was entered for a race but did not attend the circuit. Sometimes referred to as Did Not Arrive or simply a "no show." (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

did not finish  (DNF) A driver who did not finish the race. Some sanctioning bodies do not classify a driver in the final results if he did not finish completed a certain number of laps, for example in Formula One a driver must complete 90% of the completed laps to be classified as a finisher. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

did not pre-qualify  (DNPQ) A failure to qualify or pre-qualify for a race. Most often because the driver was too slow to make it into a limited number of grid positions, or was slower than the 107% rule. Refer 107% rule. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

did not qualify  (DNQ) A failure to qualify or pre-qualify for a race. Most often because the driver was too slow to make it into a limited number of grid positions, or was slower than the 107% rule. Refer 107% rule. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

did not start  (DNS) A driver who did not attempt to compete in a race, even though he may have competed in practice sessions and/or qualifying. Not the same as the DNA already mentioned. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

diesel cop/diesel bear  State department of transportation personnel, usually enforcing weight limits, diesel fuel taxes, and safety rules (brakes & tires). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Dieselgate  A 2015-2016 scandal involving Volkswagen installing software on its TDI diesel engines that only activated certain emissions controls during emissions tests. The "gate" suffix comes from the American tendency to label scandals that way ever since Watergate in the Nixon years, and the TDI cheat software was publicly outed by the United States EPA. (American Slang)

digger  Dragster (as distinct from a bodied car or flopper). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

dim-dip lamps  A dim-dip device operates the low beam headlamps (called "dipped beam" in the UK) at between 10% and 20% of normal low-beam intensity. The running lamps permitted as an alternative to dim-dip were required to emit at least 200 candela straight ahead, and no more than 800 candela in any direction. In practice, most vehicles were equipped with the dim-dip option rather than the running lamps. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

Dime, The  Interstate Highway 10. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

dipped beam  Dipped-beam (also called low, passing, or meeting beam) headlamps provide a light distribution to give adequate forward and lateral illumination without dazzling other road users with excessive glare. This beam is specified for use whenever other vehicles are present ahead. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

dirty air  The air disrupted by a car when it moves at speed, which can cause aerodynamic difficulties for a car following closely behind. The opposite of clean air. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Dirty Dan  A disgustingly nasty, smelly, unclean, unbathed, and generally unhealthy long haul truck driver who goes weeks or even months without showering. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Dirty Side  New York and New Jersey. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

disco lights  The flashing emergency lights of a law enforcement vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

disco tin  Police Car usually with high-visibility Police decals. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

disco whistle  Police Car siren. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Disney Town  Anaheim, California and the surrounding areas (named for the Disneyland Resort). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

disqualify  Where a competitor is removed from the results, usually in penalty for a technical infringement. Sometimes, but not always, interchangeable with Excluded. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

dog box  General Duties caged truck/paddy wagon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

dog clutch  A positive clutch that is either fully engaged or completely disengaged. It cannot slip. It is used only in racing. (A Hot Rod Dictionary is Born)

dog leg  The area behind the rear door on a four-door car. This area is part of the quarter panel just behind the door and in front of the rear wheel house. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Dog, The  Greyhound bus. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

dog-leg gearbox  A dog-leg gearbox is a manual transmission shift pattern distinguished by an up-over-up shift between first and second gear. The layout derives its name from a dog's hind leg, with its sharp angles. Dog leg gearboxes have fallen out of fashion primarily because most manual performance cars now have six-speed gearboxes, which are unsuited to the dog-leg layout. Dog leg layout gearboxes are desirable on performance cars because in road racing more frequent shifting occurs from second to third than from first to second gear. Examples of cars that have used this pattern for performance reasons include the BMW M535, Early 635CSi (non-US) and (non-US) M3 E30, BMW 2002 Tii and Turbo, Fiat Dino 2.4 (ZF Box), Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3-16 and 2.5-16, Mercedes-Benz 300 CE-24, Mercedes-Benz CW311, Ferrari 308/328/348, Ferrari Testarossa, Porsche 914, early 911, 924 Turbo (all featuring Getrag gearboxes), Cosworth Vega, Porsche 928, Talbot Sunbeam Lotus, Vauxhall Firenza HPF, Lancia Fulvia, Lancia Stratos, Lamborghini Countach, Maserati Biturbo, and De Tomaso Pantera. (Wikipedia: Dog-leg gearbox)

dogleg  A gentle turn or kink on a racing circuit, usually associated with road courses, but also present on oval tracks. On road courses, a dogleg may be present on a long straightaway (e.g. Mid-Ohio), curving the straight slightly, but usually not enough to require drivers to slow down much for the turn. On an oval, a dogleg can be located on the frontstretch (e.g. Charlotte) or backstretch (e.g. Phoenix) creating an oblong shape, adding a challenge, increasing sightlines for fans, and again, usually not requiring drivers to slow down for the extra curve. A quad-oval is also referred to as a "double dogleg."(See Charlotte or Atlanta Motor Speedway) Some tracks classify the dogleg as a turn (Mid Ohio turn 3) or not (Charlotte). Also known as a sweeper. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

donorcycles  A slang name for motorcycles, referring to riders being organ donors after dying in crashes.

donuts  Tires. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

door car  A class of drag racing car in which the driver enters and exits the vehicle by traditional side doors as opposed to the lift-top bodies used in other classes. Slang terms for this include "doorslammer."

door slammer  Drag racing term used to group vehicles, usually sedan bodied, that still have functional doors for driver access to the vehicle, as opposed to Funny cars which have a single lightwight outer body draped over the racing chassis. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

doorslammer  A term for a class of drag racing car in which the driver enters and exits the vehicle by traditional side doors as opposed to the lift-top bodies used in other classes. See also: "door car."

doped  (drag racing) Commonly used word in the southern states if the car is using nitrous or propane injection on diesels. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

DOT Cop  State department of transportation personnel, usually enforcing weight limits, diesel fuel taxes, and safety rules (brakes & tires). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Double A  Ann Arbor, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

double bubble  Marked Highway Patrol Police Car. Strobe bars are now used on highway patrol vehicles in all states and territories in Australia, but some regional/country police divisions still use twin blue rotating lights positioned directly above front seat positions, hence the CB slang "Double Bubble". (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Double Deuce  U.S. Route 22. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

double nickel  The 55 mph speed limit for trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

double one  Marked Highway Patrol car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

down the road graphics  (DRG) The styling of the front end of the car, which people will instantly recognize and associate with a manufacturer. For example, the grille, lights and sometimes the DLO. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

downforce  Increased force holding the car onto the track. This is created by the aerodynamics or aerodynamic aids (F1 wings, etc.) of a vehicle which causes a "reverse lift" effect. That is, creating an area of low pressure (suction) under the car and/or under the wing(s) or other aids fixed to the car, the higher pressure above forcing the tires harder to the ground, effectively increasing the static friction. This allows it to travel faster through a corner, at the cost of having a reduced overall top speed, since drag is proportionate to lift and downforce is caused by lift. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

drafting  A technique where multiple vehicles align in a close group reducing the overall effect of drag due to exploiting the lead object's slipstream. Same as slipstreaming. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

drag link  A drag link converts rotary motion from a crank arm, to a second bellcrank, usually in an automotive steering system. (Wikipedia: Drag link)

Drag Pack  Drag Pack was Ford Motor Company's marketing name for an option package available in the United States for some of its car models that included a remote mounted oil cooler and higher ratio rear axle gear (plus engine components on some models). This option is printed on the factory invoice as Drag Pack, Super Drag Pack, Drag Pak, or Super Drag Pak (the spelling "Pak" was used by the Lincoln/Mercury division of Ford). The only known exception is a factory equipped Boss 302 Mustang with the Drag Pack option, which was not marketed by Ford as such, or by any other name. At the start of the 1970 model year, Ford began installing the Drag Pack on approximately 10% of Boss 302 Mustangs. For those who were aware of it, this free Drag Pack upgrade was available simply by ordering a 4.30 rear axle ratio. The only known exceptions are two early production vehicles with 3.91 axle ratio (special factory orders which received the oil cooler), and two 4.30 axle ratio vehicles (which reportedly did not receive their intended oil cooler, possibly the result of a supply problem). The 4.30 axle ratio exceptions are insignificant in terms of establishing a meaningful pattern, as they represent a normal (1970) production line margin of error. (Wikipedia: Drag Pack)

drag reduction system  A mechanically activated element of the rear wing of modern Formula One cars, where in a predetermined position on the circuit a wing element will open, moving from steeply inclined to flat, thus reducing the amount of drag generated by the rear wing, increasing its top speed on a straightaway. The mechanism artificially assists overtaking with additional benefit of overcoming Dirty Air issues while following cars closely. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

draggin' wagon  Wrecker, or Super-Load trailer with several attachments. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

drifting  Drifting is a form of motorsport in which drivers intentionally provoke constant oversteering slides while preserving vehicle control and a high exit speed. In motor racing, drifting is a cornering technique (also called a four-wheel drift) where a car takes a high-speed corner held at an angle on the track without major steering inputs, balancing natural understeer with power oversteer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

drive-thru penalty  A penalty applied by race officials while the race is underway. A competitor is directed to drive into the pit lane and travel its length at much reduced speed (pit lanes are mostly speed-limited to protect the pitcrew and marshals) losing significant track position in the process. When the driver is serving his drive through penalty he is not allowed to stop anywhere in the pits. See also Stop-go penalty. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

driver  A polite form of address used when you do not know someone's on-the-air nickname. (See "Handle"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

drivers' meeting  A meeting where drivers and officials meet before a race to discuss the upcoming event. Also referred to as Drivers' briefing or Driver and Crew Chief meeting, as in some series, the driver and his crew chief must attend. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

driving lamps  Auxiliary high beam lamps may be fitted to provide high intensity light to enable the driver to see at longer range than the vehicle's high beam headlamps may be fitted. Such lamps are most notably fitted on rallying cars, and are occasionally fitted to production vehicles derived from or imitating such cars. They are common in countries with large stretches of unlit roads, or in regions such as the Nordic countries where the period of daylight is short during winter. "Driving lamp" is a term deriving from the early days of nighttime driving, when it was relatively rare to encounter an opposing vehicle. Only on those occasions when opposing drivers passed each other would the low (dipped or "passing") beam be used. The high beam was therefore known as the "driving beam", and this terminology is still found in international UN Regulations, which do not distinguish between a vehicle's primary (mandatory) and auxiliary (optional) upper/driving beam lamps. The "driving lamp" term has been supplanted in US regulations by the functionally descriptive term "auxiliary high-beam lamp". (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

driving while black  Refers to a fictional crime: when white police officers pull over African-American drivers for vague minor offenses (often rolling through a stop sign is cited) for the purpose of searching a vehicle and checking a driver's and/or passenger's identification, the driver is referred to by people who understand and disagree with the racial profiling involved as having been pulled over for "driving while black," shortened to DWB. Similar to "driving while Latino."

driving while Latino  Refers to a fictional crime: when white police officers pull over Latino drivers for vague minor offenses (often rolling through a stop sign is cited) for the purpose of searching a vehicle and checking a driver's and/or passenger's identification, the driver is referred to by people who understand and disagree with the racial profiling involved as having been pulled over for "driving while Latino," shortened to DWL. Similar to "driving while black."

drop head coupé  Generally a European term referring to a 2-door, 4 place automobile with a retractable canvas / cloth top with both a padded headliner and rollup windows (as opposed to side curtains). (Wikipedia: Car classification)

drop-top  A convertible. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

dry line  On a drying circuit, the racing line that becomes dry first as the cars displace water from it. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Dudley Do Right  A trooper with the Missouri State Highway Patrol. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

dumb iron  A dumb iron is a "curved side piece of a chassis, to which the front springs are attached." This is an older term, applicable mainly to vehicles built before 1950, and which had their front axle suspended on leaf springs. At the front of the car, dumb irons project forward, providing a location to attach the front of the leaf springs. (Wikipedia: Dumb iron)

dustcap  A dustcap is a small cover used on the valve stem of a bicycle or car tire to prevent dust or other small particles from entering the valve and damaging it. The dustcap also forms a pressure seal, helping to prevent deflation of the tire due to slight gas seepage past the tire valve. Dustcaps are usually made from plastic but may occasionally be made of metal. The dustcap is internally threaded and is secured by screwing it onto the end of the stem. To prevent corrosion due to electrolysis and malfunction of the electronics in a direct TPMS and avoid costly repairs, metal valve caps without insulating plastic linings should not be used on direct-TPMS-equipped tire valve stems. (Wikipedia: Dustcap)

Dutch reach  Opening the car door from inside the vehicle with the hand opposite the door (opening the left side door with the right hand). This forces the person exiting to turn around and check behind the vehicle for bicyclists passing by.

Dzus fastener  DZUS turnlock fasteners—named after their inventor—William Dzus (pronounced "Zeus") refers to a type of proprietary quarter-turn lock fastener that is often used to secure skin panels on aircraft and other high-performance vehicles. Turnlock fasteners are also referred to as quick-action panel fasteners. Invented and patented by an American engineer of Ukrainian descent William Dzus (Volodymyr Dzhus) in the early 1930s, Dzus fasteners are also used to secure plates, doors, and panels that require frequent removal for inspection and servicing. These fasteners are notable in that they are of an "over-centre" design, requiring positive sustained torque to unfasten. Thus, any minor disturbance to the fastener (e.g. vibration) will tend to correct itself rather than proceed to further loosening as it would in threaded fasteners. Turnlock fasteners are available in several different styles and are usually referred to by the manufacturer's trade name. Some of the most common are DZUS, Camloc, and Airloc. The first Dzus fasteners installed on a race car were installed by the Justice Brothers, Ed Justice, Sr. and Zeke Justice while working at Kurtis-Kraft in Glendale, California. It was at the suggestion of Ed who was an A&E at Douglas Aircraft prior to World War II and had graduated from Fry Aircraft School in Kansas City, Kansas. The car the Dzus fasteners were installed upon was "Bullet" Joe Garson's Kurtis-Kraft midget. This was done while the shop owner Frank Kurtis was out of town. At first he was not happy with their alteration to his design, but later realize the benefit of using Dzus fasteners. (Wikipedia: Dzus fastener)

E.T. slip  (drag racing) Slip of paper turned in by the race timer which denotes elapsed time for both drivers, and who won the race; it may also include reaction time and "60 foot" time. This is an official document, used for timekeeping. Also known as a timeslip. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

early doors  A popular term used by competitors when referring to the early stages of the series' season. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

ears  CB radio (ex: "How bout ya JB, got ya ears on?") (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Easytronic  Easytronic is the Opel tradename for a type of transaxle-based semi-automatic transmission or gearbox, as used in some Opel/Vauxhall cars. Easytronic is not a tiptronic gearbox design; it does not have a torque converter. It is fundamentally a conventional manual transmission, with a single-plate dry clutch. The transmission is controlled by an electronic control unit (ECU). (Wikipedia: Easytronic)

eaten by a bear  Someone who is arrested by police, you can see the arrested person in the patrol car, especially if said patrol car has a "cage" in it. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

EcoDiesel  EcoDiesel is an engine used in the Ram 1500 since 2014, as well as in the Jeep Grand Cherokee. Approximately 20% of 2015 RAM 1500s are equipped with the engine, mostly ones sold in Europe. FCA uses the EcoDiesel name for two different engines. One is the VM Motori A 630 DOHC 3.0L engine used in the Grand Cherokee, and Ram. The other is a Fiat 3.0L diesel used in the Ram ProMaster. (Wikipedia: EcoDiesel)

econobox  Slang for a small economy car, particularly ones with simple, flat styling reminiscent of a box. Example: Dodge Omni.

eighteen wheeler  A Tractor/Semi-trailer or transport truck with trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

elapsed time  A term used in drag racing about the total time the run took, from start, to finish. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

emergency locking retractor  A retractor on a seat belt system that locks when the vehicle slows or stops suddenly. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

End of the World  Venice, Louisiana One road in, one road out. 60 miles south east of New Orleans. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ERS  Part of the hybrid engines used in Formula One since 2014, that recover energy from the brakes and heat and stores it in batteries, which is then used to boost power. It combines both a kinetic energy recovery system (KERS), known officially as the Motor Generator Unit – Kinetic (MGU-K), and a system recovering heat from the turbocharger, officially known as the Motor Generator Unit – Heat (MGU-H). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Esky  Escanaba, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

espada  Portuguese nickname for a limousine (the same word for Sword – long piece of metal). Not used in Brazilian Portuguese. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

esses  Sequences of alternating turns on a road course, resembling the letter 'S'. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

estate car  A station wagon (also known as an estate or estate car) is an automobile with a body style variant of a sedan/saloon with its roof extended rearward over a shared passenger/cargo volume with access at the back via a third or fifth door (the liftgate or tailgate), instead of a trunk lid. The body style transforms a standard three-box design into a two-box design—to include an A, B, and C-pillar, as well as a D-pillar. Station wagons can flexibly reconfigure their interior volume via fold-down rear seats to prioritize either passenger or cargo volume. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

estate car  European term for station wagon, a car where a substantial portion of the rear of the car is enclosed as part of the passenger cabin.

Evel Knievel  A police officer on a motorcycle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Everflex  Everflex is a British fabric used as a roof covering on cars, and is a type of vinyl roof. Everflex is used on both hardtops and convertibles. Its usage was popular from the 1960s to the 1980s on luxury cars. Though its popularity has greatly decreased for new vehicles, it is still manufactured for restorers. The material is similar to the vinyl used on most vehicles, but is more durable and more expensive. On hardtop vehicles, fabric is placed below the Everflex material to add weight and body, often making the car look more like a genuine convertible. On older vehicles, a fabric called "Union Cloth" was used, but it quickly deteriorates; trapping water and damaging the Everflex material and roof. The Everflex is then glued down and can be screwed in around doors and windows. Three notable car companies that use Everflex material are Rolls-Royce, Bentley Motors Limited and Jaguar Cars. The feature was most popular on the Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow in the early 1970s. (Wikipedia: Everflex)

excluded  Removed from competition before the race has started, generally due to an infringement during practice or qualifying. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

executive car  These are luxurious equivalents to full-size cars. This also refers to the largest hatchbacks within the similar length in this class, such as the Porsche Panamera. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

eyeballs  Headlights. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

factory team  A more specific version of Factory-backed referring to racing teams run directly from the factory of the vehicle manufacturer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

factory-backed  A racing team/driver that competes with official sanction and financial support from a manufacturer. In Europe, known as a works team. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

fairing  An external structure added to increase streamlining, deflect wind, and reduce drag. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Fairyland  San Francisco, California. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

fan car  Usually refers specifically to the Brabham BT46 Formula One car, although the concept was actually pioneered by sports car manufacturer Chaparral Cars on the Chaparral 2J. The placement of a large fan at the rear of the chassis driven either independently or by the engine with the purpose of creating negative air-pressure underneath the car to create additional downforce for increased cornering speed. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

fascia  The body-skin panel at the front of the car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

fastback  A design where the roof slopes at a smooth angle to the tail of the car, but the rear window does not open as a separate "door". (Wikipedia: Car classification)

fastest lap  Fastest time in which a lap was completed by a driver during a race. Sometimes rewarded with bonus championship points. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

fat cat  An overweight truck driver or other burden on society. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Faux-rari  Using the prefix "faux," meaning "fake," in place of the beginning of Ferrari, this denotes a car that is a "fake Ferrari," something styled as a Ferrari but not made by the Ferrari company, including, for example, body kits used on Pontiac Fieros to make them resemble Ferraris on the outside only, full replica kit cars often with non-Ferrari engines, and even to the most purist of Ferrari followers, the Dino 256GT.

Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards  Regulations that define minimum safety performance requirements for motor vehicles or items of motor vehicle equipment. These regulations are intended to protect the public from unreasonable risk of crashes that occur as a result of the design, construction, or performance of motor vehicles or related equipment. The regulations are also designed to protect the public against unreasonable risk of death or injury in the event crashes do occur. The standard that applies to car seats is FMVSS 213. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Federal Pork Chop Express  A FedEx truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

feed the bear  Pay a traffic fine. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

fender bender  A road traffic accident/crash. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

fender flopper  (drag racing) Funny Car. Coined by dragster crews in the late 1960s to separate Funny Cars, which had fiberglass bodies with fenders, from dragsters. Erroneously attributed to flip-top bodies of Funny Cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

fender  Term for cowl covering the wheels of the vehicles. In more modern automobiles, this refers generally to the body panel or panels starting at the front "bumper" to the first door line excluding the engine hood. The opposite of the fender is the "quarter panel". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

field filler  A driver or team usually slower than the majority of the field that only participates if there are open spots. See also start and park. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

field  The competing cars in an event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Filthy Freddy  (also Double F) An overweight longhaul truck driver or other miscreant of society that goes weeks or even months without bathing. This is the male counterpart of the "Hungry Heifer". (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Firechicken  A Pontiac Firebird. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

first or worse  In drag racing, if both drivers commit a foul, the driver who commits the foul first loses, unless it is two separate fouls, where the loser is the driver who committed the worse foul; (a foul start is worse than a break out, in a bracket class with breakout rules in effect, then a lane violation is worse than foul start, and failure to participate in a post-run inspection is worst). The "worse" part is in case of a double breakout, the driver closer to their index wins. If one driver commits a foul start, but the opponent crosses a boundary line (wall or center line), the driver who commits the red light wins. The only double disqualification fouls are deep staging, leaving before the tree is activated, or crossing the boundary line (although an official has the right to declare the driver who crossed the line second was forced; in a final, only the first to cross the line is disqualified). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

flag spot  When a wheel locks under braking, the car skids and leaves a flat spot on the section of the tyre that was touching the ground at the time. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

flag waver taxi  Highway construction truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

flag-to-flag coverage  Television or radio coverage that consists of the entire race start-to-finish rather than highlights, tape delayed, "packaged" coverage, or highlights of the first portion of the race before broadcasting the final quarter of the race live. Derives from green flag (start) to checkered flag (finish). Instituted largely in the late 1970s, with the 1979 Daytona 500 being the first major 500-mile race with live, flag-to-flag coverage. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Flagtown  Flagstaff, Arizona. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

flaming chicken  A nickname for the flaming bird depicted on some Pontiac Firebirds and Trans Ams.

flash for cash  Speed Camera, or Red Light Camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

flat rack  A flatbed trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

flexing  Slang for showing off a car's capabilities, akin to flexing muscles. (Top Gear, 2012)

flip-flop/flip-side  The return leg of a trip. (ex: "Catch you on the flip-flop" means "I'll contact you again on the way back.") (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

floorpan  The floorpan is a large sheet metal stamping that often incorporates several smaller welded stampings to form the floor of a large vehicle and the position of its external and structural panels. In the case of monocoque designs, the floorpan is the most important metal part establishing the chassis, body, and thus the car’s size. It serves as the foundation of most of the structural and mechanical components of a unibody automobile to which the powertrain, suspension system, and other parts are attached. The term is also applied to the smaller stamped panels that form the floors inside a vehicle as well as the bottom of the trunk. (Wikipedia: Floorpan)

flopper  (drag racing) Funny Car, short for "fender flopper." Coined by dragster crews in the late 1960s to separate Funny Cars, which had fiberglass bodies with fenders, from dragsters. Erroneously attributed to flip-top bodies of Funny Cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Flower Town  Garden City, Kansas. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

fly in the sky  A police aircraft. While state police often use fixed-wing airplanes to monitor highway traffic, "fly" refers specifically to a helicopter. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

flyboy  A speeding vehicle, one that is driving way over the speed limit and is certain to get a ticket. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

flying lap  A lap started by a competitor at optimum speed, as opposed to a lap from a standing start, usually in qualifying. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Flying Tire Salesman  An officer of the Ohio State Highway Patrol. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

fog lamps  Front fog lamps provide a wide, bar-shaped beam of light with a sharp cutoff at the top, and are generally aimed and mounted low. They may produce white or selective yellow light, and were designed for use at low speed to increase the illumination directed towards the road surface and verges in conditions of poor visibility due to rain, fog, dust or snow. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

Fordite  Also known as Detroit agate or Motor Agate, is old automobile paint which has hardened sufficiently to be cut and polished. It was formed from the buildup of layers of enamel paint slag on tracks and skids on which cars were hand spray-painted (a now automated process), which have been baked numerous times. In recent times the material has been upcycled into eco-friendly jewelry. (Wikipedia: Fordite) The layers formed from the frequent changing of paint colors resemble a kind of bright rainbow sandstone.

formation lap  The lap cars make before forming up on the grid for the start. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

formula racing  A type of racing, generally open wheeled, where the conditions of technical entry comply with strict rules or formulae. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

forward bite  A slang term for grip on acceleration, commonly used in American stock car racing (American Southern English)

Forward Look  Forward Look was a design theme employed by Virgil Exner in styling the 1955 through 1961 Chrysler Corporation vehicles. After seeing the P-38-inspired tailfins on the 1948 Cadillac, Exner adopted fins as a central element of his vehicle designs. He believed in the aerodynamic benefits of the fins, and even used wind tunnel testing at the University of Michigan—but he also liked their visual effects on the car. Exner lowered the roofline and made the cars sleeker, smoother, and more aggressive. In 1955, Chrysler introduced "The New 100-Million Dollar Look". With a long hood and short deck, the wedgelike designs of the Chrysler 300 letter series and revised 1957 models suddenly brought the company to the forefront of design, with Ford and General Motors quickly working to catch up. The 1957 Plymouths were advertised with the slogan, "Suddenly, it's 1960!" (Wikipedia: Forward Look)

forward-facing car seat  A car seat intended for use only in the forward-facing position for a child at least age 1 and at least 20 pounds, up to the specified height and weight limits of the seat, set by the manufacturer. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

four banger  A four-cylinder engine. (American Slang)

four on the floor  A four-speed manual gearshift where the shift lever is located on the vehicle floor. Similar in phrasing to "three on the tree."

four wheel phone booth  Someone using a cell phone while driving. Several states in the US and countries have outlawed this, but it still goes on. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

four-wheeler  While this is commonly used to refer to a four-wheel-drive vehicle (such as a jeep or pickup), among truck drivers it refers to any vehicle with only 2 axles, as distinguished from an "eighteen-wheeler" (a semi truck). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

frame-on-rail  A design used in older (pre-unibody) cars, trucks, and SUVs. The power train and body are mounted to a rigid structural framework called a rail. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

free practice  When drivers or riders learn the circuit and/or teams experiment with race settings for the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

freebander  One who operates an illegally modified CB radio, often broadcasting outside the regulated frequencies. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Freedom Driving  An act of driving a vehicle without a driver's license or a vehicle license, as practiced by members of America's "sovereign citizens" movement, which does not recognize federal or state government authority.

Freightshaker  A Freightliner Trucks tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Frenching  A form of molding by which headlamp rims are smoothed into the fender line. The rims are usually eliminated. (A Hot Rod Dictionary is Born)

front door  The first vehicle in the line of a convoy, or the area ahead of a vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

front position lamps  "Front position lamps", known as "parking lamps" or "parking lights" in the US, Canada and Australia and "front sidelights" in the UK provide nighttime standing-vehicle conspicuity. They were designed to use little electricity, so they could be left on for periods of time while parked. Despite the UK term, these are not the same as the side marker lights described below. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

fronting  A practice where young, high-risk drivers get an insurance policy on their car in their parents name to lower the price of the insurance.

fuel cell  A fuel tank with a flexible inner liner to minimize the potential for punctures in the event of a collision or other mishap resulting in serious damage to the vehicle. Mandatory in most forms of motorsport. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

fuel line  A fuel line is a hose used to bring fuel from one point in a vehicle to another or from a storage tank to a vehicle. It is commonly made of reinforced rubber to prevent splitting and kinking. The United States Environmental Protection Agency defines a fuel line as "all hoses or tubing designed to contain liquid fuel or fuel vapor. This includes all hoses or tubing for the filler neck, for connections between dual fuel tanks, and for connecting a carbon canister to the fuel tank. This does not include hoses or tubing for routing crankcase vapors to the engine's intake or any other hoses or tubing that are open to the atmosphere." (Wikipedia: Fuel line)

fuel  (drag racing) Mix of methanol and nitromethane ("pop," nitro); race class using it. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

fueler  (drag racing) Any car running fuel or in Fuel class (most often, TFD or TF/FC). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

full course yellow  When yellow flags are deployed at every flag point around a race circuit and a Safety Car leads the field until a hazard is cleared. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Full Grown Bear  A state policeman/trooper. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

full-size luxury car  Also known as full-size luxury cars, grand saloons, or premium large cars, while "Oberklasse" is used in Germany. Typically a four-door saloon (sedan). These are the most powerful saloons, with six, eight and twelve-cylinder engines and have more equipment than smaller models. Vehicles in this category include some of the models from the flagship lines of luxury car brands, such as Cadillac CT6, Lincoln Town Car and Maserati Quattroporte. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

funny car  (drag racing) A vehicle with a single-piece body draped over the chassis which is lifted off or rear-hinged to allow the driver access to the cabin; a race class for such a car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

furgão  Portuguese alternative term (less used) for a van. Used in Brazilian Portuguese, most often for vans but sometimes for panel van variants of passenger cars. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

furgoneta  Spanish and Polish term for a van, in the latter language almost always used in its diminutive form furgonetka. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

fusible link  A wire that functions as a fuse, burning out at an amperage above what the circuit can handle. Different from a fuse in that it looks like a normal wire.

G'ville  Gardnerville, Nevada (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

gap  Beating an opponent in a heads up drag race with a visible distance between the between the 2 competitors. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

gapers  People who slow down traffic to look at an accident, especially on a divided expressway where traffic coming in the opposite direction of where the accident occurred shouldn't be slowed because there aren't any lanes being blocked for cleanup in that direction.

Garagiste  Also called garagistas, disparaging term given by Enzo Ferrari to describe the new wave of British racing cars such as Cooper and Team Lotus that challenged his team with a smaller budget. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Garbage State  New Jersey. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

gasser  Bodied drag racer running on gasoline (before Pro Stock was introduced). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Gateway  St. Louis, Missouri. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

gator guts  Smaller pieces of shredded tire usually preceding a larger piece of "gator" or "gator back". (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

gator  A large piece of a truck tire's tread in the roadway. The name comes from the tire tread's resemblance to the scaly ridges of an alligator's back, or the propensity for these pieces of tread to be drawn up between the cab and trailer by the air currents of a truck at highway speeds "like a snapping gator", and sever the air brake lines between the tractor and the trailer. Most newer trucks have shield plates designed to prevent this. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Gay Bay  San Francisco Bay area. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Gbaka  A minibus, usually a small van, in the Ivory Coast.

Geartronic  Geartronic is Volvo Cars' name for its manumatic transmission, similar to Porsche's Tiptronic. It is available in 4, 5, 6, and 8 speed models, and is controlled by a microprocessor. The microprocessor automatically shifts to the next gear if a forgetful user in manual mode red lines the engine. Manual shifting is allowed with the gear stick in the manual mode. The gear stick can also be used just like any other automatic gearbox, where the transmission will shift automatically. Geartronic is offered on Volvo vehicles with engine displacements of 2.0 liters or greater. Geartronic transmissions are manufactured in Japan by Aisin AW. They require the use of automatic transmission fluid that meets the JWS 3309 specification. The MY2011 6 speed requires AW1. (Wikipedia: Geartronic)

Geisterfahrer  Translates to "ghost driver," it refers to someone driving the wrong way down a divided highway, usually on the Autobahn.

gentleman driver  in sportscar racing, typically refers to a driver who is not a professional racing driver. These drivers' primary source of income is not related to motorsport. Most sportscar racing categories today use a driver rating system where notable drivers with major accomplishment in single-seater competition and under 50 years of age are platinum, drivers with major wins in domestic motorsport or platinum-level drivers 50-59, gentleman drivers who are experienced are silver, and gentleman drivers with an entry-level (B) international licence, or platinum-level drivers older than 60 (Emerson Fittipaldi raced in the 2014 6 Hours of São Paulo as a bronze driver because of his age) are declared bronze. Many series require gentleman drivers in lower-level categories (P2 and GTE-AM in WEC, PC and GT3/GTD in IMSA) and only allow one professional driver in a three-driver team in those classes. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Georgia Overdrive  Shifting into neutral on a down grade to gain speed without using fuel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ghost ride  Calling dispatch and announcing you've just picked up a flag, when you haven't. This is used when a driver suspects the next call from dispatch will send him to a bad customer (a drunk, short ride, etc.). Drivers would rather give up their place in line than pick up some of these creeps. He'll wait 10 minutes, then call dispatch saying he's clear, and get back in line at a cab stand. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

Ghost Town  Casper, Wyoming (named for the cartoon character Casper the Friendly Ghost). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

GI Joe  Truck carrying Hummers, soldiers, even Tanks, other military equipment. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

gill  A vent on the side of the fender that can be used as hot-air outlet, but usually decorative. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

give 'em the tour  Driving people the long way round to pump up the meter. This is the age old problem with taking taxis in a city you're not familiar with. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

Glass City  Toledo, Ohio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

glass run channel  A glass run channel is a groove, normally made of rubber or plastic, that is found around windows (most commonly car windows). The primary purpose of a glass run channel is to provide a seal for the window. (Wikipedia: Glass run channel)

go-go juice  Fuel (usually Diesel, since large trucks seldom run on gasoline.) (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

good buddy  In the 1970s, this was the stereotypical term for a friend or acquaintance on a CB radio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

good neighbor  This has replaced "good buddy" as the acceptable term for friend. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Grachan  Grachan or Garuchan comes from the 70s and 80s Grand Championships on Fuji Speedway. The Bosozoku used to have big meetings on the parkinglots of these events, hence the name. These cars should also match the same bodyshape styling as the cars running on the circuits, with big wide fenders like used on the Super Silhouette styling. (What is bosozoku?)

graining  When small grains of rubber start coming off a tyre. See also marbles. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Grand Chelem  To qualify on pole, set the fastest lap, win and lead every lap of a grand prix. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

grand marshal  Ceremonial marshaling role at a race meeting. Largely held by celebrities or retired notable drivers with no actual duties or responsibilities beyond the waving of a flag to commence activity or to announce the traditional start your engines prior to some races. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

grand saloon  Also known as full-size luxury cars, grand saloons, or premium large cars, while "Oberklasse" is used in Germany. Typically a four-door saloon (sedan). These are the most powerful saloons, with six, eight and twelve-cylinder engines and have more equipment than smaller models. Vehicles in this category include some of the models from the flagship lines of luxury car brands, such as Cadillac CT6, Lincoln Town Car and Maserati Quattroporte. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

grand tourer  Larger, more powerful and heavier than sports cars, these vehicles typically have a FR layout and seating for four passengers (2+2). These are more expensive than sports cars but not as expensive as supercars. Grand Tourers encompass both luxury and high-performance. Some grand tourers are hand-built. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

granny lane  The far right lane (slow lane). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

gravel trap  Off-track run-off area, usually positioned on the outside of corners, filled with gravel intended to slow down and stop cars that have left the track at speed. Generally there are tyre barriers between a gravel trap and the catch fencing, in order to protect the spectators. Sometimes nicknamed "kitty litter" for its visual resemblance. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Green Stamps  Used to express a toll road. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

green track  A paved race course that is clean from rubber buildup, oil/grease, marbles (see below), and debris, typically cleansed by means of a recent rain shower. A "green track" is usually considered preferable. Track crews may also use jet blowers to remove marbles and debris from the surface, to mimic the green track conditions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

green-white-checker finish  When a full-course caution comes out right before the end of a race, the race is extended beyond its scheduled distance. Depending on sanctioning body, there may be either one or multiple attempts at a restart, between one and five laps, before the race is declared officially over. NASCAR's national series will have a maximum of three attempts if the penultimate lap only under caution, while some short track races have unlimited attempts at a span between one and five consecutive green-flag laps. In British Superbike Championship motorcycle racing, if a caution is called in the final third of the race, three additional laps will be added on the ensuing restart in a green-white-checker style finish. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

greenhouse  The glassed-in upper section of the car's body. Daylight Opening (DLO) in turn describes the actual window areas only. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

grenade  Wreck an engine (the engine "grenaded") so violently that internal parts of the engine breaking through the block and / or bolt on parts (cylinder heads, oil pans, etc) to blow off the engine. Distinct from "popping the blower". A hand-grenade engine is a usually derogatory engine of tuned to maximise engine power at the cost of low mechanical reliability. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

grid  The starting formation of a race, generally in rows of two for cars and three or four for bikes. The Indianapolis 500 traditionally has a unique grid of three cars per row. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

grocery grabber  A Minivan, station wagon, or other family car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

groove  The optimal path around the track for the lowest lap time. In drag racing it is about the center portion of the lane, where the cars can gain traction quicker. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

ground effect  A method of creating downforce by the shape of the car's body, notably by shaping the underside of the car in combination with the car's lateral edges in order to trap and dramatically slow the airflow running underneath the car, effectively turning the entire car into a wing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Guitar Town  Nashville. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Gum ball machine  A popular style of rotating mirror light used by many state police and some other law enforcement agencies at the time, however can also refer to any law enforcement vehicle. It looked somewhat like the round style of 'penny' gumball machines. It was basically a clear cylinder, like an upside down jar, with lights and a spinning mirror system inside. It was usually mounted on the center of the roof. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Gurney flap  A small lip placed at the trailing edge of a race car's aerodynamic wing. Despite its relative size, often only millimetres tall, it can double the downforce achieved by the wing, although at the premium of increasing drag, hence the small size. Named for the man commonly attributed to its proliferation, Formula One driver and constructor, Dan Gurney. Also known as a wickerbill. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

gyroscopic car  A two-wheeled automobile, one wheel at the front and the other at the rear, and kept balanced by a gyroscope.

H Town  Houston, Texas. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

H&D  Hate and Discontent, the atmosphere of tension created on a CB channel by constant argument and verbal assault. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hacker  Person or individual operating a radio transmission without regard for standard rules or etiquette. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hairdryer  Stationary Highway Patrol LIDAR/Radar set up. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hairpin  A tight 180 degree corner that twists back on itself. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

half cheese  A short school bus. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hamburger helper  Power amplifier / Linear, used to boost transmission power. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hamhock  Person using an amateur radio callsign (as opposed to a handle) or procedure on CB. Using amateur radio practices on CB is not illegal in itself, but is considered awkward or out-of-place. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hammer lane  The far left lane (fast lane). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

handicap  Where cars start a race in the reverse order of qualifying, or perceived race pace, usually with timed gaps between cars starting a race. More common in racing's early days than today, the effect was the produce a race result in which all cars would arrive at the race finish together, regardless of the performance of the race vehicle. Another form of handicapping is success ballast, where more successful cars are assessed a weight penalty for every win, and Balance of Power in sportscar racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

handle  The nickname a CB user uses in CB transmissions. Other CB users will refer to the user by this nickname. To say "What's your handle?" is to ask another user for their CB nickname. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

handling package  A handling package is a set of functional enhancements to the suspension of a vehicle, sold and priced as a unit. This package may contain one or more of the following enhancements, some of which are detrimental to ride comfort and quietness: Harder suspension bushings; Enhanced shock absorbers, which will usually have stiffer valving which may be locally or remotely adjustable; Stiffer front anti-roll bar; Rear anti-roll bar; Special wheels and tires, typically with lightweight wheels of increased diameter and low profile tires offering greater resistance to side forces - such are usually less durable than standard tire/wheel combinations, being subject to both tire and wheel damage by rough pavement ("potholes"). (Wikipedia: Handling package)

Hanford Device  A spoiler attached across the back of the rear wing to greatly increase drag. The result is a massive increase in the slipstream, which improves wheel-to-wheel competition as well as multiple lead changes per lap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

hang around nellie  A repulsively obese woman that hangs around truckstops looking for a man. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

HANS Device  Also known as a head restraint, is a safety item compulsory in many car racing sports. It reduces the likelihood of head and/or neck injuries, such as a basilar skull fracture, in the event of a crash. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Happy Rock  Gladstone, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hardtop  A coupe or sedan lacking a center window post between the front windshield post and the rearmost window post or body section. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

harness adjuster  Part used to tighten or loosen the harness of a car seat. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

harness buckle  Where the harness system connects and locks. This device secures the straps that contact your child's shoulders, hips, and groin. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

harness retainer clip  See chest clip. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

harness slots  Parts of car seat where the harness straps go through the seat shell. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

harness  Straps that keep the child in the car seat and distribute crash forces. Infant (rear-facing only), forward-facing only, combination, convertible, all-in-one car seats come equipped with harness straps which are fed through harness slots. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

harvey wallbanger  A driver who appears to be drunk or is driving recklessly. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hatchback  Incorporates a shared passenger and cargo volume, with rearmost accessibility via a rear third or fifth door, typically a top-hinged liftgate—and features such as fold-down rear seats to enable flexibility within the shared passenger/cargo volume. As a two-box design, the body style typically includes A, B and C-pillars, and may include a D-pillar. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

hauling fence post holes  Hooked to an empty trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hauling sailboat fuel  Hooked to an empty trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hauling Volkswagen radiators  Hooked to an empty trailer. Refers to older Volkswagens, which were air cooled and didn't have radiators. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

headliner  A headliner often is a composite material that is adhered to the inside roof of automobiles or yachts. It typically consists of a face fabric with nonwoven or foam backing. Headliners consist of multilayered composite materials that bring together multiple functionalities, including the requested look, feel, stiffness, and sound reduction needed in cars. Automotive headliners are optimised with respect to head impact counter measures or to integrate additional LED lighting film behind the fabric. Most headliners consist of a tricot knit fabric that is napped to provide a soft touch and uniform appearance. The fabric is adhered to melted polyurethane foam. This fabric-foam composite is glued to the interior fiberglass roof of the automobile. There are more complex knit products used as a face fabric, as well as less expensive non-woven products. Recent headliner developments include environmentally friendly products made of recyclable backing-adhesive and face fabrics. (Wikipedia: Headliner)

heads-up racing  In drag racing, where both drivers leave at the same time and is used in all professional ("pro") classes. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

hearse  A converted car (often a station wagon), light truck or minivan usually used to transport the dead. Often longer and heavier than the vehicle on which they are usually based. Can sometimes double up as an ambulance in some countries, such as the United States, especially in rural areas. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

heat  A shorter race which decides the participants of the main race and sometimes starting order as well, usually there are more heats in which only a part of the drivers from the entry list take part. Can also mean part of the main race, when it consists of two or more parts. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Hemorrhoid with a Polaroid  A law officer monitoring traffic with a radar gun. Today, this can also refer to an automated speed camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

high beam  (also called main beam, driving, or full beam) headlamps provide an intense, centre-weighted distribution of light with no particular control of glare. Therefore, they are only suitable for use when alone on the road, as the glare they produce will dazzle other drivers. ECE and Japanese Regulations permit higher-intensity, high-beam headlamps than allowed under US regulations. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

high-back booster seat  See booster seat. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Hillsburrito  Hillsboro, Oregon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hip point  The pivot point between the torso and upper leg portions of the body, either relative to the floor of the vehicle or relative to the height above pavement level, as used in vehicle design. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

hitting the jackpot  Getting stopped by a state trooper. Lights on trooper cars look like slot machine lights. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Hofmeister Kink  The Hofmeister kink (sometimes also translated Hofmeister kick, German: Hofmeister-Knick) is an automobile design feature seen on modern BMWs and automobiles by other manufacturers. Despite the feature — which consists of a low forward bend at the C-pillar or D-pillar in the case of touring vehicles or SUV's — being used broadly across automotive makes, the term "Hofmeister kink" is generally used in reference to automobiles designed by BMW. Source: Wikipedia

Hog Town  Toronto, Ontario and Cincinnati, Ohio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hole in the wall  A tunnel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

holeshot  When beginning a race from a standing start: (motorcycle, off-road), the rider who is the first one through the first turn at the start of a race. (drag racing) Getting a substantial starting line advantage due to a quicker reaction time. The other driver gets "holeshotted" "welded to the line" or "left at the tree." A "holeshot win" is any win in a heads-up class where a slower car beats a faster car because of better reaction time, despite having a slower elapsed time (e.t.). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

homologation  Process by which a new vehicle or part of a vehicle is approved by organizers for usage in racing. It also refers to the majority of the world's road racing sanctioning bodies having a racing class following the FIA's Group GT3 formula. This was done to allow a car to be raced in multiple series with no changes. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

honey bear  A female law enforcement officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hood lifter  A mechanic. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hood  The hood (American English) or bonnet (British English) is the hinged cover over the engine of motor vehicles that allows access to the engine compartment (or trunk on rear-engine and some mid-engine vehicles) for maintenance and repair. In British terminology, hood refers to a fabric cover over the passenger compartment of the car (known as the 'top' in the US). In many motor vehicles built in the 1930s and 1940s, the resemblance to an actual hood or bonnet is clear when open and viewed head-on; in modern vehicles it continues to serve the same purpose but no longer resembles a head covering. (Wikipedia: Hood)

hood  The hood (American English) or bonnet (British English) is the hinged cover over the engine of motor vehicles that allows access to the engine compartment (or trunk on rear-engine and some mid-engine vehicles) for maintenance and repair. In British terminology, hood refers to a fabric cover over the passenger compartment of the car (known as the 'top' in the US). In many motor vehicles built in the 1930s and 1940s, the resemblance to an actual hood or bonnet is clear when open and viewed head-on; in modern vehicles it continues to serve the same purpose but no longer resembles a head covering. (Wikipedia: Hood)

hook up  (drag racing) Good traction between tires and track resulting in increased acceleration and reduced slipping or smoking of tires. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Hooker City  Fresno, California. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hoon  A term originally from Australia & New Zealand, this word can be used as either a noun describing the driver who engages in "hooning," it can also be used as a verb.  To hoon originally meant anti-social, fast, loud driving, and street racing.  As its use has become widespread outside Australia the definition has expanded to be a generic term of driving a car to its limits, especially if drifting, burnouts, and excessive tire smoke are involved.

Hopeless  Hopewell, Virginia. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

horseless carriage  An early name for an automobile, as many were constructed on the same principles as carriages of the day.

hot hatch  A hot hatch is a high-performance hatchback, based on standard superminis or small family cars with improved performance, handling and styling. Hot hatches are very popular in Europe, where hatchbacks are by far the most common body style for this size of car. In North America, sport compacts are usually sold as saloons or coupés rather than hatchbacks. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

hot lap  A lap started by a competitor at optimum speed, as opposed to a lap from a standing start, usually in qualifying. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Hotlanta  Atlanta, Georgia. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

how many candles are you burning?  Asking how old someone is. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hubometer  A hubometer (hub, center of a wheel + -ometer, measure of), or hubodometer or simply hubo, is a device mounted on the axle of an automobile or other land vehicle that measures distance traveled. The whole device rotates with the wheel except for an eccentrically mounted weight on an internal shaft. This remains pointing downwards and drives the counting mechanism as the body of the hubometer rotates round it. They are needed on semi-trailers where they are the only means of measuring distance traveled over the lifetime of a tire or the trailer. They are used on bus or truck or trailer wheels where the tires are supplied to the vehicle operator by an independent company on a contract of "price per thousand kilometers". The hubometer is installed by the tire company to give them their own measure. In New Zealand hubodometers are used for the calculation of road user charges for HGVs powered by a fuel not taxed at source. (Wikipedia: Hubometer)

hung out to dry  Typically used in context to pack racing; a car that pulls out of the "draft train" to make a pass, but ends up losing many positions. Numerous cars drafting closely together normally drive faster than one car by itself. The lone car hung out to dry sometimes falls all the way to the end of the draft train. Also known as freight trained. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

hungry heifer  A grossly overweight female one meets over the CB. Usually lacks any type of personal hygiene. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Husky  A truck built by the Brockway Motor Company noted for the Husky dog hood ornament. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

hydrolock  When an internal combustion engine is force stopped for being unable to complete its compression stroke due to uncompressable liquid (often water) in the combustion chamber.

hydrolocking  Excessive fuel entering (flooding) one or more cylinders due to abnormal operating conditions. The fuel can not be compressed, causing damage to the motor. Most common in drag racing. May cause the motor to grenade. May also happen if a motor ingests water through the air intake. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

hypermiling  A driving technique that maximizes fuel efficiency above all else.

I'm gone  Indicates that one is finished transmitting and may not be listening to the conversation any longer, or may be traveling out of receiving range. Equivalent to "Signing off", "Out", or "Clear" in formalized radio voice procedure. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

I-1-O  Interstate 10. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Ice-Capading  Losing traction on the roads due to icy conditions; can refer to either the trucker, or witnessing it happen to someone else. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

idle air control actuator  An idle air control actuator or idle air control valve (IAC actuator/valve) is a device commonly used in fuel-injected vehicles to control the engine's idling RPM. In carburetted vehicles a similar device known as an idle speed control actuator is used. (Wikipedia: Idle air control actuator)

idler arm  On an automobile or truck with a conventional parallelogram steering linkage, the idler arm or idler arm assembly is a pivoting support for the steering linkage. The idler arm supports the end of the center link on the passenger's side of the vehicle. The idler arm bolts to the vehicle's frame or subframe. Generally, an idler arm is attached between the opposite side of the center link from the Pitman arm and the vehicle's frame to hold the center link at the proper height. Idler arms are generally more vulnerable to wear than Pitman arms because of the pivot function built into them. If the idler arm is fitted with grease fittings, these should be lubricated with a grease gun at each oil change. (Wikipedia: Idler arm)

ijapa  Yoruba term for a two door car. Literally modeled after a Tortoise animal. Also refers to Volkswagen Beetle. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Illini Bound  Illinois bound traffic also known as "Lincoln Bound." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

impact wrench  A tool specifically designed for rapidly winding off and on wheel nuts, allowing the changing of wheels and tyres to be performed faster during pit stops. Also known as an impactor, air wrench, air gun, rattle gun, torque gun. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

impound rule  NASCAR's version of Parc Fermè, used at certain tracks. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

in-lap  Any lap which concludes with a visit to the pits, especially a pre-arranged pit stop, either during a race or during practice or qualifying. Often drivers push hard to drive fast on their in-lap (despite perhaps having worn out tires) in order to gain time during the pit stop sequence. See Delta time. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

incident officer  A motorsport marshal who is in charge of other marshals on the track, allocating duties to them. Second in rank to observer. In hillclimbing, they are responsible for the radio communication. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

independent  A competitor (team or driver) taking part with no or very little backing from a manufacturer. They have their own championship within the World Touring Car Championship, where there is a strong manufacturer presence. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Indy 500  Indianapolis, Indiana. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

inertial switch  An inertial switch is a switch, firmly mounted upon a vehicle or other mobile device, that triggers in the event of shock or vibration. It is a part of electrical circuits that may either enable or disable some function. The switch shown to the right is intended to disable an electric fuel pump in automotive applications. This functionality is required in some vehicle racing applications, since an electric fuel pump may otherwise continue operating after a collision or rollover. If the fuel line is broken or the vehicle is inverted, fuel may be spilled, creating a fire hazard. A small loose weight (called a proof mass) is trapped within a spring-loaded cage. A shock in any direction will cause movement of the mass relative to the cage. If sufficiently shocked, the cage will spring open which actuates an associated switch. The switch is reset by pressing the cage closed through the flexible (red) top cover, retrapping the mass. These switches are also used to open a contactor (a large relay) to disable the high power circuit of a battery electric vehicle upon collision. (Wikipedia: Inertial switch)

infant car seat  See rear-facing only seat. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

inspection station  A dedicated location staffed by Child Passenger Safety Technicians who are certified to teach parents and caregivers how to install their car seats. An inspection station may also be referred to as a "seat checking station." (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

installation lap  A lap which can take place in practice or qualifying, which is intended simply to gain data and telemetry for the driver or team, rather than any intention of setting a competitive time. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

instrument panel  The Dashboard is termed as Instrument Panel in Automotive Industries, sometimes this term is confused with the Instrument Cluster that is the group of speedometer, odometer and similar devices generally behind the steering wheel. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

insurance policy  A legal document outlining a particular insurance cover for an insured entity for a given risk. Synonym: insurance contract. Source: Wikipedia 2012

insurer  One who insures Source: Wikipedia 2012

intermediate tyre  A wet weather tyre of lighter grooving than a wet weather tyre. Sometimes an intermediate is a slick tyre with grooves cut into it. It is used for conditions between dry and wet conditions, most often when the track is wet but it is not actually raining. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

international season  In Australian sprint car racing, the time generally between December and February. Because of Australia being in the Southern Hemisphere, some drivers in North America will fly down to Australia during the time and participate in various meetings before the World of Outlaws season starts in Barberville, Florida in February. The recognised International Season typically runs from Christmas Day (because of the time difference, it usually is Christmas night United States time, where the international drivers are based, until the week before the Barberville meeting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

invert  The portion of the field which is started by reverse qualifying speed. With an invert of five, the fifth-fastest qualifier starts first and the fastest qualifier starts fifth. The rest of the field starts by their qualifying speed (sixth fastest starts sixth). The invert is often not announced before qualifying or a dice/die roll happens after qualifying. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

J-Ville  Jacksonville, Florida. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Jabber  Someone using foreign language on the CB. US law does not forbid other languages on the radio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Jake brake  Jacobs engine retarder brake used to help slow rigs on down grades. Now used to mean any similar system uses engine compression to hold back a rig on a down grade (IE. the pac brake = pacific engine brake). Both make a loud roaring sound. Some townships have bylaws in place that limit the use of such brakes in residential or other areas due to this noise. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

James Bond  In drag racing, when driver's reaction time (when he leaves the start line) is seven thousands of a second after the green light (.007). A "Red" is a reaction time of -.007 seconds (red light), which is disqualification unless the opponent commits a more serious violation. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

jet dryer  An airplane engine mounted on a pickup truck or trailer. The exhaust from the engine is used to blow debris or evaporate moisture from the racing surface. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

jet pilot  Speeding vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Jibber Jabber on Channel 9  Someone using foreign language on Channel 9, which is not illegal. Channel 9 on the CB is supposed to be used only to report emergencies, such as an overturned truck, fire, criminal matters, related matters. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Jimmy  A GMC tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Johnny Law  Police officer, especially a city cop or a local sheriff's deputy. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Joker Lap  In Rallycross events each vehicle must run a lap with a detour once during each single race. In events overseen by the FIA, such as the FIA World Rallycross Championship, this lap must be at least two seconds slower, therefore, the alternative route makes the lap longer. In the American Global Rallycross series the Joker Lap is usually a bit shorter than a lap on the original track. The Joker Lap idea was thought up as a tactical component by Svend Hansen, the late father of 14-times FIA European Rallycross Champion Kenneth Hansen, to spice up the competition. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

jump start  In a standing start, when a vehicle moves from its grid slot before the start of a race is signaled. In a rolling start, when a car passes before they cross the start-finish line or the restart line. When this is done, a penalty is usually imposed. In drag racing, a jump start is signalled by a red light in the offending driver's lane, and he loses unless a more serious foul (boundary line or failure to report to post-race inspection after a round win) occurs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

K-Whopper  A Kenworth tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

K-Wobbler  A Kenworth tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Kadenacy effect  The Kadenacy effect is an effect of pressure-waves in gases. It is named after Michel Kadenacy who obtained a French patent for an engine utilizing the effect in 1933. There are also European and US patents. In simple terms, the momentum of the exhaust gas leaving the cylinder of an internal combustion engine creates a pressure-drop in the cylinder which assists the flow of a fresh charge of air, or fuel-air mixture, into the cylinder. The effect can be maximized by careful design of the inlet and exhaust passages. (Wikipedia: Kadenacy effect)

kammback  Originally, a car with a tapered rear that cuts off abruptly. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Kenosha Cadillac  American Motors car such as a Gremlin Pacer, Matador, Eagle, or Hornet. Term comes from Kenosha, Wisconsin, where an American Motors assembly plant and an engine plant used to be. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

kerb-hopping  To clip, or drive over completely, the concrete kerbs (curbs) on the inside of a corner. While often the fastest method of negotiating chicanes in particular, the practice is usually frowned upon by race officials for the damage it can do to the kerbs, tyres and vehicles. The practice also can drag debris or water from behind the kerb onto the racing line. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

key up  To engage the microphone button. ex: "When did you key up your mike last? (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

kick a tire  To urinate using the quadruple tractor or trailer tires. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

kick it in  What the person who is being called will say on his radio as a response. (for example: "How 'bout 'cha, Blue Beard. You got a copy on Shamrock?" "This is Blue Beard. Kick it in.") (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

kicker  A Linear Amplifier that is used to boost the transmitting power of a CB Radio above the legal four watts. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Kiddy Car  A school bus. Some bus drivers have a CB and will say "Kiddy Car stopping ahead." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Kinetic Energy Recovery System  A device which recovers energy created when brakes are applied and stores it until required to add power in the engine. In 2008 KERS systems started to appear in the World Rally Championship and Formula One followed soon after, where its application is limited to a push to pass system. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

kit  (drag racing) Refers to a turbo kit or a nitrous kit. Using nitrous oxide in the professional categories in drag racing is illegal. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

kitty litter  Informal term with two possible meanings. It is either a nickname for a gravel trap, or for a material applied to the track surface to clean up a leaking fluid. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Kitty-Whopper  A Kenworth tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Kojak with a Kodak  A law officer monitoring traffic with a radar gun. Today, this can also refer to an automated speed camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

kombi  A German abbreviation of "Kombinationswagen" (Combination Car) and it is German name for station wagon. Since Germany is a major producer of cars for many European countries, the term Kombi in this meaning is also used in Swedish, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Slovenian, Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese, Bulgarian. In Afrikaans and in Australia, Kombi is also used to refer to a Volkswagen Microbus. In Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay the word specifically refers to the VW Microbus. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

KUNG  KUNG is the English transcription of the Cyrillic initialism КУНГ for Russian: кузов унифицированный нулевого (нормального) габарита (unified body of zero dimension). The KUNG is a Soviet then Russian term for a standardized military vehicle module/trailer system. The most widespread standard frame-metal body-van is assembled from steel angles and angle bars, steering aluminum sheets outside, but inside - impregnated varnished plywood. The voids between the sheathing panels are filled with reinforced foam. All bodies, regardless of specialization, to supply heating, ventilation, lighting and ceiling light household equipment. (Wikipedia: KUNG)

Kyusha style  Kyusha style literally means “Japanese old classic car” which in a lot of cases mean it is an old car modified with some (smaller) fender flares, lowered and nice rims under it. (What is bosozoku?)

labels  Information required by Federal standards affixed to car seats or booster seats. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

ladder series  Generally refers to a category or series of lesser importance which in most cases will race at the same race meeting as a senior category. Cars will be generally similar in characteristic to drive but will be smaller, less powerful and/or slower. Competitors will generally be younger emerging drivers who are climbing an apprenticeship 'ladder' towards entry into the senior series. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Lambda reading  Fuel to air ratio readings, used to determine how much fuel is pushed through the fuel injectors into the cylinders for combustion. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

landaulet  A limousine with the passenger section covered by a convertible top. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

lap belt  A seat belt that is secured to the framework of a seat or car and fastens across the lap of a driver or a passenger. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

lap of honour  A non-competitive lap taken before or after the race by a driver in celebration. Also known as a lap of honor, or, if after the race, a victory lap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

lap record  Fastest race lap recorded at a circuit for a category of race car. The circumstances allowed vary significantly, but practice laps are generally not considered official records. Laps recorded in qualifying may or may not contribute but are sometimes referred together with practice laps as Qualifying lap record. The outright lap record is the fastest race lap ever recorded at any particular circuit, regardless of category of vehicle being raced. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

large family car  A class described as "large family" in Europe and "mid-size" in the USA, these cars have room for five adults and a large trunk (boot). Engines are more powerful than small family/compact cars and six-cylinder engines are more common than in smaller cars. Car sizes vary from region to region; in Europe, large family cars are rarely over 4,700 mm (15.4 ft) long, while in North America, Middle East and Australasia they may be well over 4,800 mm (15.7 ft). (Wikipedia: Car classification)

latch plate  The seat belt part that connects the seat belt webbing to a buckle in the vehicle. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

LATCH  Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children. A system used to install car seats in vehicles using two lower anchors and one tether. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Le Mans car  A slang given by the general public to describe a sports prototype racing car, commonly a Le Mans Prototype and its predecessors including Group C, Group 6 and Group 5, regardless if it is competing at Le Mans or not. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

lead trophy  A nickname for success ballast. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms) Refers to the metal lead, not the lead of a race. In some series, weights are added to a car if it has won races to bring it back into parity with the rest of the field.

leafscreen retainer  Bonded to the base of the windscreen to provide a mounting surface for the leafscreen. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

leafscreen  Plastic clips onto the base of the windscreen under the bonnet to protect from leaves. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

leisure activity vehicle  A small van, generally related to a supermini, with a second or even a third seat row, and a large, tall boot. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

LEO  Short for Law Enforcement Officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

level indicator  Part of car seat that helps identify correct rear-facing recline angles. Recline angle is important especially for young babies as it keeps their fragile necks and heads from falling forward and restricting their airways. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

liability insurance  Any insurance against a potential loss due to the insured's liability for injury or damage to others. Source: Wikipedia 2012

licensed car  A car produced under license granted by the Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers as required under the Selden Patent while it was in effect.

lid  The top of something, either a crash helmet or the roof of a car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

lie book  A trucker's log book. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

liftback  A broad marketing term for a hatchback, which incorporates a shared passenger and cargo volume, with rearmost accessibility via a top-hinged liftgate. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

lights out  In many types of Formula, sports car, touring car, and drag racing the race begins when the starting lights go out. In these contexts "lights out" refers to the start of the race. In stock car racing the lights on the pace car go out on the final lap before a restart, and in this context (depending on each series'/track's rules) it can refer to the final lap before the race start or the final caution lap before a restart when cars are expected to get into formation for the green flag.

limo liberal  Someone in a limousine. Taken from comments made by Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity regarding liberals riding in limousines. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

limousine  By definition, a chauffeur-driven car with a (normally glass-windowed) division between the front seats and the rear. In German, the term simply means a sedan. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Lincoln Bound  Illinois bound Traffic, not Chicago. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

lit the tires  (drag racing) Lost traction, producing smoke. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Little Bears  A police officer belonging to a city or township police department. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

little cheese  A small school bus, usually built on a 1-ton van chassis (aka cutaway). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Little Cuba  Miami, Florida. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

little white pills  Stimulants used to keep the driver awake on long hauls. Mentioned in Dave Dudley's original version of the song "Six Days on the Road". (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

livery  The paint colors and decals applied to a vehicle to mark its sponsorship or team identity. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Local Yokel  A law officer with a city or township police force, seldom encountered on interstate highways. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

locking clip  Holds a car seat in the proper position during normal driving when no other locking mechanism is available. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

lollipop  A sign on a stick used in pit stops, which is held in front of the car and raised when the pit stop is completed. Though the same basic device is utilized in NASCAR and IndyCar, generic terms such as pit board or sign board are preferred as the sign is not round, but sometimes square, and often is in a specific design unique to the driver or team (such as Kevin Harvick's happy face logo, or a team's number stylised as it fits on the car). In addition, in NASCAR & IndyCar, the sign is usually only used for the driver to locate their pit box. It is pulled back, and not normally used to signal departure as it is in Formula One. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

long block  Long block is an automotive term for an engine sub-assembly that consists of the assembled block, crankshaft, cylinder head, camshaft (usually), and valve train. A long block does not include fuel system, electrical, intake, and exhaust components, as well as other components. (Wikipedia: Long block)

Lost Wages  Las Vegas, Nevada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

lot lizard  Prostitute, especially one that frequents truck stops. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Louisville  A Ford L-Series Truck. This term originated because the Ford L-Series Trucks were built at a Ford truck plant near Louisville, Kentucky. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

low beam  (also called dipped beam, passing, or meeting beam) headlamps provide a light distribution to give adequate forward and lateral illumination without dazzling other road users with excessive glare. This beam is specified for use whenever other vehicles are present ahead. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

lower anchor attachments  Attachments used in place of vehicle seat belt to secure car seat or booster seat. Consists of lower anchor connectors and the lower anchor strap for flexible lower anchor attachments. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

lower anchors  Horizontal bars in the vehicle seat that provide a secure anchor for the car seat's lower attachments. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

lower tie bar  A lower tie bar is an alloy/steel bar that ties the lower suspension pick-up points of a vehicle (with an independent suspension) together. It increases chassis rigidity by bracing the left and right lower-control-arm sheet metal mounting points. The lower tie bar is designed to reduce the non-pivoting movement of the control arms and to stiffen the subframe to lessen the distortion of the lower suspension, especially during hard cornering. As a result, it improves the handling and steering response of the vehicle. It may also provide additional benefits in front-wheel drive vehicles by reducing wheel hop and torque steer. The bar may lower ground clearance by as much as 30 millimeters on some aftermarket installations. The lower tie bar is mostly an aftermarket car component. Some of the few exceptions to this rule are the Honda Integra and Civic Type-R, as well as the Daihatsu Charade GTti. Since the lower tie bar is one of the cheapest upgrade that tuners can install on their cars, it is probably one of the first performance accessories is acquired. The lower tie bar is a bolt-on device and no stock parts will have to be replaced or removed when it is being installed on the vehicle (unless the vehicle already has one on it). These characteristics make the lower tie bar a popular performance upgrade among car tuning enthusiasts for its appearance and slight performance gain. (Wikipedia: Lower tie bar)

lying to dispatch  Lying is involved with many of these tactics, but there's one specific lie that's funny. A driver might pick up a fare who says he's going a short distance, but you lie to dispatch, saying it's a long ride. It is done to ram home the awful luck of the Town Clown (see below), hoping he'll get frustrated and leave for the day. Fewer cabs on the streets means more money for the rest. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

Mad-Rock  Madison, Wisconsin & Rockford, Illinois Metro areas including Janesville and Beloit. This area is shared by I-90/I-39. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Magic City, The  Birmingham, Alabama. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

main beam  Main-beam (also called high, driving, or full beam) headlamps provide an intense, centre-weighted distribution of light with no particular control of glare. Therefore, they are only suitable for use when alone on the road, as the glare they produce will dazzle other drivers. ECE and Japanese Regulations permit higher-intensity, high-beam headlamps than allowed under US regulations. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

Mama Bear  A female law enforcement officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Man-you-stink  The small town of Manistique, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Manettino dial  Manettino dials are a part of some modern Ferrari cars (beginning with the Ferrari F430 in 2004). These adjustment dials are mounted on the steering wheel, usually just underneath the center of the wheel. The Manettino (Italian: little lever) is inspired by the controls found on F1 steering wheels, but have a more polished appearance. The dial allows for the quick and simple adjustment of the electronics governing suspension settings, traction control, electronic differential, and change speed of electronic gearbox. A similar control system was employed on the Ferrari Enzo, but used individual buttons for different settings rather than a single rotary switch. (Wikipedia: Manettino dial)

manifold absolute pressure sensor  The manifold absolute pressure sensor (MAP sensor) is one of the sensors used in an internal combustion engine's electronic control system. Engines that use a MAP sensor are typically fuel injected. The manifold absolute pressure sensor provides instantaneous manifold pressure information to the engine's electronic control unit (ECU). The data is used to calculate air density and determine the engine's air mass flow rate, which in turn determines the required fuel metering for optimum combustion (see stoichiometry) and influence the advance or retard of ignition timing. A fuel-injected engine may alternatively use a mass airflow sensor (MAF sensor) to detect the intake airflow. A typical naturally aspirated engine configuration employs one or the other, whereas forced induction engines typically use both; a MAF sensor on the intake tract pre-turbo and a MAP sensor on the charge pipe leading to the throttle body. (Wikipedia: MAP sensor)

marbles  Pieces of rubber from tires that accumulate on the racing surface outside of the racing line that are slippery like toy marbles. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Marmite car  Named for a British savory spread, known for being an acquired taste that people either love or hate but are rarely indifferent towards, a "Marmite car" is a car that inspires strong reactions of love or hate, or an offbeat car that's considered an acquired taste.

marshal  A person responsible for signaling track conditions to drivers (through use of flags), extinguishing fires, removing damaged cars from the track and sometimes providing emergency first aid. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

marshmallow  A Swift truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

mass airflow sensor  A mass (air) flow sensor (MAF) is used to find out the mass flow rate of air entering a fuel-injected internal combustion engine. The air mass information is necessary for the engine control unit (ECU) to balance and deliver the correct fuel mass to the engine. Air changes its density as it expands and contracts with temperature and pressure. In automotive applications, air density varies with the ambient temperature, altitude and the use of forced induction, which means that mass flow sensors are more appropriate than volumetric flow sensors for determining the quantity of intake air in each cylinder. (Wikipedia: Mass flow sensor)

Mass-a-Two-Shits  Massachusetts. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

matutu  A 14-seat minibus van.

meat wagon  Ambulance. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

meatball  A specific racing flag used in some countries to indicate to a competitor there is a defect with the car which has the potential to cause a safety risk to the competitor or to another competitor. Most usually applied to trailing smoke or loose bodywork. The flag is black with a large orange dot in the centre of the flag, looking vaguely like a meatball. Some racing series use this flag to indicate the car being flagged is no longer being scored, due to ignoring orders to pit because of a rules infraction. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

meth  (drag racing) Refers to methanol injection used in conjunction with racing gasoline. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Mickey Mouse corner  A pejorative term for a corner or series of corners on a circuit that are thought to be poorly designed, slow, uncompetitive, uninteresting, and usually difficult or near impossible to overtake through, which detract from the overall challenge of the course. In some cases where the entire course is deemed poorly designed, it can be referred to as a "Mickey Mouse track." (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Mickey Mouse Towns  Location of the Walt Disney theme parks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

microcar  Straddling the boundary between car and motorbike, these vehicles have engines under 1.0 litre, typically seat only two passengers, and are sometimes unorthodox in construction. Some microcars are three-wheelers, while the majority have four wheels. Microcars were popular in post-war Europe, where their appearance led them to be called "Bubble cars". More recent microcars are often electric powered. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

microvan  Term for a boxy wagon-type of car that is smaller than a conventional minivan; often without rear sliding door(s). Examples are Citroën Picasso, Renault Scénic, Toyota Yaris Verso or Mercedes-Benz A-Class. In Japan, this term is used for Kei car based vans. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

midsize car  A class described as "large family" in Europe and "mid-size" in the USA, these cars have room for five adults and a large trunk (boot). Engines are more powerful than small family/compact cars and six-cylinder engines are more common than in smaller cars. Car sizes vary from region to region; in Europe, large family cars are rarely over 4,700 mm (15.4 ft) long, while in North America, Middle East and Australasia they may be well over 4,800 mm (15.7 ft). (Wikipedia: Car classification)

military carrier  Truck carrying Hummers, soldiers, even Tanks, other military equipment. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

mill  Any internal combustion engine used in a race car (inherited from hot rodding slang). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Miniac  A fan of the Mini, a portmanteau of Mini and maniac.

minibus  A vehicle, usually a van, used as a bus to transport more passengers than a typical car or minivan is capable of.

minibus  Designed to carry fewer people than a full-size bus, generally up to 16 people in multiple rows of seats. Passenger access in normally via a sliding door on one side of the vehicle. One example of a van with a minibus version available is the Ford Transit. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Miss Piggy  A female law enforcement officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

missing man formation  The vehicle on the pole position drops back a row during a pace lap to salute a deceased motorsport personality. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Mistake On The Lake  Chicago, Illinois—also Cleveland, Ohio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

mobile chicane  Disparaging slang. A competitor noticeably slower than the front running pace, so slow as to be a 'chicane that moves around the track'. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

mobile parking lot  A large car hauler (18 wheeler). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

molding  Automotive molding or car body molding are decorative and protective moldings on the car body. The term applies both to the detail and the material. (Wikipedia: Automotive molding)

Monkey Town  Montgomery, Alabama. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

monsoon wet  Increasingly common nickname for an extreme weather version of the wet weather tyre. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

monsoonshield  A window deflector is mounted above the doors of some automobiles, to protect the inside of the car from rain or other precipitation in case of slightly opened windows. Additionally, it may help to prevent precipitation entering the interior in case of an opened door, e.g. dropping from the roof or directly from the air. Deflectors are also fitted to sunroofs to deviate wind. It is also known as a "monsoonshield" or a "rain visor" (in countries without monsoon). The primary purpose of window deflectors is to prevent dust, snow, rain, other precipitation or excessive wind from entering to the cabin. Also, window deflectors direct air flows over the vehicle, and thus, reduce the wind noise when driving on moderate speeds. Window deflectors can be installed directly in the window channel or attached to the vehicle's body in the sunroof or side window area using 3M automotive-grade adhesive tape. Window deflectors are common accessory in the automotive aftermarket. Being vehicle-specific, they are normally designed to fit individual car, truck or SUV models. (Wikipedia: Window deflector)

moonroof  A sultry term for a glass sunroof that lets light in while closed. Examples include Acura ILX, and Pontiac G6. (Wikipedia: Sunroof)

motion lotion  Fuel (usually Diesel, since large trucks seldom run on gasoline.) (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Motor Agate  Also known as Detroit agate or Fordite, is old automobile paint which has hardened sufficiently to be cut and polished. It was formed from the buildup of layers of enamel paint slag on tracks and skids on which cars were hand spray-painted (a now automated process), which have been baked numerous times. In recent times the material has been upcycled into eco-friendly jewelry. (Wikipedia: Fordite) The layers formed from the frequent changing of paint colors resemble a kind of bright rainbow sandstone.

Motor City  Detroit, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

motor insurance  Insurance purchased by the owner of a vehicle to cover losses due to traffic accidents or theft. Synonyms:  car insurance, auto insurance (UK English) Source: Wiktionary 2012

Motorsport Valley  A tag given to the mid-south of England by the Motorsport Industry Association where high concentration of activities within the motorsport industry on and off track occur. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Mountain Folk  The mountains of rural Western North Carolina to the Tennessee State Line. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

mountain motor  (mainly North American) Term for large-displacement engines, often used in hot rods and drag racers. Named for their size (over 8,100 cubic centimetres, or 500 cubic inches, the limit in some sanctioning bodies), and for being constructed in the mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

mudflap  A mudflap or mud guard is used in combination with the vehicle fender to protect the vehicle, passengers, other vehicles, and pedestrians from mud and other flying debris thrown into the air by the rotating tire. A mudflap is typically made from a flexible material such as rubber that is not easily damaged by contact with flying debris, the tire, or the road surface. Mudflaps can be large rectangular sheets suspended behind the tires, or may be small molded lips below the rear of the vehicle's wheel wells. Mudflaps can be aerodynamically engineered, utilizing shaping, louvers or vents to improve airflow and lower drag. While some flaps are plain, in the colour of rubber, many contain company logos, other art or sometimes advertisements. Another is the mudflap girl, a woman's silhouette. In the United States, there are mudflap regulations that vary from state to state. (Wikipedia: mudflap)

multi-purpose vehicle  (MPV) A large car or small bus designed to be used on and off-road and easily convertible to facilitate loading of goods from facilitating carrying people. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Murrayism  A funny term or phrase originally uttered during a broadcast, by and named in honour of veteran Formula One broadcaster, Murray Walker. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

muscle car  The muscle car term generally refers to rear wheel drive mid-size car or full-size cars with powerful V8 engines, manufactured in the U.S. Some definitions limit it to two-door vehicles; however, others include four-door body style versions. Although opinions vary, it is generally accepted that classic muscle cars were produced in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Muscle cars were also produced in Australia and other nations. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Music Town  Nashville, Tennessee. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

my balls are sagging  Parts are falling off the truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

mystery caution  An unknown condition caution in the closing laps of a race called for the purpose of closing up the field, typically to create a Green/White/Checkered shoot-out finish. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

NACA duct  A distinctively shaped inlet that is flush and begins with a narrow, shallow inset and becomes progressively wider and deeper. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

nap trap  Motel or rest stop. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Nationals  Most NHRA events are called Nationals, referring to the first race held by the NHRA in a parking lot in Pomona, California, called simply, "The Nationals." (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

New Jersey Termite  New Jersey Turnpike. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Nickel City  Buffalo, New York. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

nitro  (drag racing) Nitromethane (sometimes incorrectly used to refer to nitrous oxide). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

nitrous  (drag racing) Refers to nitrous oxide systems manufactured by a wide range of companies. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Nodak  The State of North Dakota. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

not classified  A driver was racing at the end of the race, but did not complete the required distance to be classified. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Not too Swift  Derogatory nickname for a Swift truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

notchback  A configuration where the third box of a three-box styling configuration is less pronounced — especially where the rear deck (third box) is short or where the rear window is upright. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

oberklasse  Also known as full-size luxury cars, grand saloons, or premium large cars, while "Oberklasse" is used in Germany. Typically a four-door saloon (sedan). These are the most powerful saloons, with six, eight and twelve-cylinder engines and have more equipment than smaller models. Vehicles in this category include some of the models from the flagship lines of luxury car brands, such as Cadillac CT6, Lincoln Town Car and Maserati Quattroporte. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

obscuration band  Black Graphite printed onto the glass to hide unsightly areas and improve aesthetics. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

observer  The highest ranking trackside marshal within the post; the main decision maker at the event of an incident, they relay information to the race control. Can be seen standing in the marshal post. Second to Chief Marshal. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

office on wheels  Office workers using the car as an office while in traffic. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

oildown  (drag racing) When a car's engine or lubrication breaks during a run, leaving a streak of oil and other fluids on the track. This is punishable by fines, point penalties, and/or suspension. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Okie City  Oklahoma City, Oklahoma where I-40, I-35 and I-44 all cross paths. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Oldsmoslider  Oldsmobile car or station wagon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

one-box form  A categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the One-Box, also called a monospace or monovolume, it is a single continuous volume. Slight wedge formed front or rear are still generally placed in this category. e.g., Bus, original Ford Econoline. The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "1-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

one-make racing  Racing equipment that must be identical for all competitors, usually to cut down on costs or for business purposes by car manufacturers. Known in North America as spec, specific parts can be spec, as in the IndyCar Series' spec engine, or the type of car can be spec, as in spec racing series such as Spec Miata. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

oooooooops  An obnoxious way to get attention for purposes of being informative. Word said on CB referring to an accident or a police traffic stop, "Oooops at the 49." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

open wheel car  A specific type of racing car in which the wheels are not enclosed by bodywork of the car, e.g.: Formula One. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

out lap  The first lap to be completed after exiting the pit lane, either during a race or during practice or qualifying. Also known as a reconnaissance lap if it is not taken at race speed, e.g. when a car leaves the pit lane to take up its position on the grid prior to the race start. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

out-brake  Gaining time or position by braking harder and deeper in a corner. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

outbander  One who operates an illegally modified CB radio, often broadcasting outside the regulated frequencies. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

outright lap record  Fastest lap recorded at a circuit of any category of race car. Most often this does not include qualifying and practice laps but confusingly some sources occasionally include laps not recorded during races. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

outside flame ignitor  An outside flame ignitor was an early ignition device used in internal-combustion engines that used a flame outside the engine and a sliding port on the cylinder head. At the appropriate time in the compression cycle of the engine, the port would briefly be opened and closed allowing the fuel/air mixture in the cylinder to be ignited by the flame. They had many problems, including partial loss of compression through the port when it opened and many mechanical problems with the mechanism that operated the port. They were considered obsolete before 1911. (Wikipedia: Outside flame ignitor)

over and out  Phrase meaning the CB'er is stopping talking and either turning the CB off or going to another channel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Over-the-Tank Hank  Name given as an insult to another man implying that person is a homosexual. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

overdrive  (drag racing) The ratio between the revolutions of the supercharger to the revolutions of the engine, controlling amount of boost; see underdrive. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

overhang  The distance which the car's body extends beyond the wheelbase at the front (front overhang) and rear (rear overhang). In car style design terms, this is the amount of body that is beyond the wheels or wheel arches. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

overpowering the track  A drag racing term used when talking about a run when the driver loses traction. It is normally used to talk about the actions of the team crew chief. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

oversteer  Cornering behaviour where the rear wheels do not track behind the front wheels but instead move out toward the outside of the turn. Opposite of understeer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

oxygen sensor  An oxygen sensor (or lambda sensor) is an electronic device that measures the proportion of oxygen (O2) in the gas or liquid being analysed. The most common application is to measure the exhaust gas concentration of oxygen for internal combustion engines in automobiles and other vehicles in order to calculate and, if required, dynamically adjust the air fuel ratio so that catalytic converters can work optimally, and also determine whether a catalytic converter is performing properly or not (Wikipedia: Oxygen sensor)

pace notes  In rally racing, notes that describe the course in great detail. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

package  An automotive package is a set of optional automobile features that are included in a bundle that is installed at the factory (this is, they are added to the standard features). In some cases, elements from multiple packages may be combined to create a model level. Such mixing of packages is common in imported vehicles, where it is relatively difficult to produce specific combinations to a customer's order owing to relatively long shipping times. For example, a high level luxury package may include a premium sound system, projector headlights, a navigation system, and side curtain air bags,and heat seats with this particular combination sold only as a high level model, with some designation such as "DX" (delux), "LE" (luxury edition), "SE" (special edition) and "ES" (electric standard). Package is also an industry term for the job of defining the basic architecture of the vehicle. This includes figuring out how to fit the engine, transmission and passengers into the car, and what the ground clearance will be. (Wikipedia: Automotive package)

Packardbaker  The Packards for 1957 and 1958 were essentially Studebaker Presidents with large amounts of bright work. (Studebaker-Packard Corporation: Packardbaker)

Packertown  Green Bay, Wisconsin, home of the Green Bay Packers football team. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

paddock  An enclosure at a track used by team support personnel and vehicles, and other officials and VIPs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Panam  Shortened slang term for the Carrera Panamericana, the famous Mexican border-to-border race of the 1950's.

Pancake City  Liberal, Kansas, host of the Fat Tuesday Pancake Race. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

panel truck  A panel truck in U.S. and Canadian usage is a small delivery truck with a fully enclosed body. It typically has no rear windows in the rear cargo area and is a van built on a truck chassis. (Wikipedia: Panel truck)

Papa Bear  A police supervisor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Paper Hanger  Police giving speeding ticket. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

parade lap  A lap before a motorsport race begins where the drivers go around the track at a slow speed, also known as a formation lap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Parc fermé  An area which cars enter after they have qualified for the race, where they are not allowed to be worked upon by mechanics unless on strict supervision by the stewards. Some motorsports series other than Formula One refer to this as the Impound. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

parking lamps  "Front position lamps", known as "parking lamps" or "parking lights" in the US, Canada and Australia and "front sidelights" in the UK provide nighttime standing-vehicle conspicuity. They were designed to use little electricity, so they could be left on for periods of time while parked. Despite the UK term, these are not the same as the side marker lights described below. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

pay driver  A driver who pays for his race seat rather than receiving a salary from the team. Generally has a negative connotation. Sometimes known as a Ride Buyer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pay wagon  an armored car, usually full of money as it goes from place to place, then to a bank. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

pay-as-you-drive (PAYD)  Converts automotive insurance from a fixed to a per mile cost, providing a financial incentive to drive less. Source: FHWA 2012

pedalfest  (drag racing) Where both cars break traction and the drivers have to work the throttle to get the car to regain traction, but keep the car going fast enough to win the race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pedalling  (drag racing) Working the throttle to avoid lighting the tires, or as a way to sandbag; "pedalled" it, had to "pedal" it. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Peg, The  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

people carrier  European name to describe what is usually referred to in North America as a Minivan. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

perua  Brazilian Portuguese term either designating a van (especially as spoken in the city of São Paulo) or a station wagon (in the city of Rio de Janeiro). (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Pete  A Peterbilt tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Petercar  A Peterbilt tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

phaeton  An open vehicle, usually with 4 doors, with a removable and/or retractable cloth top and a windshield characterized by the lack of integrated glass side windows. Contemporary uses of this name do not always follow this original description or apply to an open vehicle. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

photo finish  A finish in which two or more cars are so close that in times past a photograph of the finishers crossing the finish line would need to be studied to determine the finishing order. While the practice has been mostly superseded by modern electronic timing systems, the location of the transponder in a vehicle is not located near the nose of the vehicle, so stewards often use video replays to detect where the nose (of a car) or wheel (of a motorcycle) crosses the finish line first. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pickle park  An interstate rest area frequented by prostitutes. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

picture-taker  A law officer monitoring traffic with a radar gun. Today, this can also refer to an automated speed camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Pie Car  Pacific Intermountain Express (PIE) truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

piggy bank  an armored car, usually full of money as it goes from place to place, then to a bank. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

pill  A power transistor in an illegal linear amplifier. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

pillar  A structural member that connects the roof to the body of the car. Pillars are usually notated from front to back alphabetically (e.g. A-pillar joins the windshield to the frontmost side windows, B-pillar is next to the front occupants' heads, etc.). US DOT Term: Means any structure, excluding glazing and the vertical portion of door window frames, but including accompanying molding, attached components such as safety belt anchorages and coat hooks, that (1) supports either a roof or any other structure (such as a roll-bar) above the driver's head or (2) is located along a side edge of a window. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

pillarless  Usually a prefix to coupé, fastback, or hardtop; completely open at the sides when the windows are down, without a central pillar, e.g. the Sunbeam Rapier fastback coupé. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

piston ring  A thin, narrow elastic ring which fits into a circumferential groove in the piston. The ring is cut through on one side to allow it to expand and press against the cylinder wall. Source: Automobile Catechism 1910

pit board  A board that is held up from the pit wall to the side of the finishing straight when a driver goes past, to confirm their position in the race and the amount of laps remaining. Before the introduction of radio communication, also used to instruct drivers to pit for fuel and/or tires, or to comply with rules violations. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pit stop  Stopping in the pit lane for repairs, refuelling, and/or new tires. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pit wall  Where the team owners and managers sit to observe the race, opposite the garages in the pit lane. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Pitman arm  The Pitman arm is a steering component in an automobile or truck. As a linkage attached to the steering box (see recirculating ball) sector shaft, it converts the angular motion of the sector shaft into the linear motion needed to steer the wheels. The arm is supported by the sector shaft and supports the drag link or center link with a ball joint. It transmits the motion it receives from the steering box into the drag (or center) link, causing it to move left or right to turn the wheels in the appropriate direction. The idler arm is attached between the opposite side of the center link from the Pitman arm and the vehicle's frame to hold the center or drag link at the proper height. A worn ball joint can cause play in the steering, and may get worse over time. (Wikipedia: Pitman arm)

Pittsburgh Garbage Truck  A PGT truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Plain Brown Wrapper  Unmarked police car (Often referred to by the car's actual color). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

plenum  The area at the base of the windshield where the wipers are parked. Also refers to the main chamber in an intake manifold. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

plug-in hybrid electric vehicle  A hybrid vehicle that can be plugged into the electric grid to recharge its battery to reduce gasoline usage. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

Polar Bear  An all-white highway patrol car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

pole position  The first grid position, placed closest to the starting line (in Formula One), nearest the inside of the first turn, or both. Usually reserved for the competitor who has recorded the fastest lap during qualifying. A competitor who starts a race there is said to be on the pole. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Polish victory lap  In American stock car racing, a victory lap done in reverse, with the driver's window closer to the fans. Named for Polish-American racer Alan Kulwicki, who was known for driving his victory laps this way. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Pollock Express  Pacific Intermountain Express (PIE) truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

polystyrene  The type of plastic commonly used in model car production.  It is a flammable synthetic polymer made from styrene, a monomer derived from petroleum.

Poncho  A Pontiac car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ponton styling  A 1930s–1960s design genre when distinct running boards and fully articulated fenders became less common and bodywork began to enclose the full width and uninterrupted length of a car in a markedly bulbous, slab-sided fashion. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

pony car  A class of sporty American coupes that includes the Chevrolet Camaro, AMC Javelin/AMX, and Dodge Challenger; the name is derived from the first car of the type: the Ford Mustang.

pony car  The pony car is a class of American Muscle car automobile launched and inspired by the Ford Mustang in 1964. It describes an affordable, compact, highly styled car with a sporty or performance-oriented image. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Pony Express  Mail hauler. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Poor Boy  A Peterbilt tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

popping the blower  (drag racing) When an intake valve hangs open, allowing the igniting fuel in the combustion chamber to leave the chamber. This, in turn, causes the fuel in the intake manifold to explode, blowing the blower off the top of the motor. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Pork Chop Express  A FedEx truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

pork steer  The tendency of a vehicle to lean towards the driver's side when an obese driver is heavy enough to affect the vehicle's suspension. A pun on the term "torque steer." (English slang)

porky pig  Person using an amateur radio callsign (as opposed to a handle) or procedure on CB. Using amateur radio practices on CB is not illegal in itself, but is considered awkward or out-of-place. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

portable barn yard  Cattle or hog truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

portable gas station  A tank truck carrying fuel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

portable parking lot  A large car hauler (18 wheeler). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

power brakes  Automobile brakes originally were made without vacuum or electric aids of any sort. When vacuum assist was invented, cars with this technology were said to have "power brakes" to until such a time came about that the technology was standard on just about every car made.

power bulge  A power bulge is a raised part (a bulge) of the hood of a car. The reason for a power bulge is to fit, for instance, a large engine or air filters that otherwise would not fit. Sometimes a power bulge is used to be able to fit a larger engine into a car that originally was not designed for it or it may be a design choice to be able to get a lower profile. As a power bulge is associated with performance cars, it may also be used as a design element to give the impression of a fast car. (Wikipedia: Power bulge)

powertrain  All the components that generate power and deliver it to the road surface. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

powertrain  All the components that generate power and deliver it to the tyres. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

PP Guy  A police officer with the Ontario Provincial Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

pre-qualifying  A preliminary qualifying session held prior to a regular qualifying session in order to reduce the number of competitors taking part in the regular session, usually for safety reasons. An example of pre-qualifying is in Formula One in the late 1980s and early 1990s. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pregnant rollerskate  A Volkswagen Beetle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

privateer  A competitor not directly supported by a sponsor or manufacturer. To be privately funded. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pro tree  (drag racing) Timing lights which flash all three yellow lights simultaneously, and after four tenths of a second, turn green. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

progressive grid  Where a category races multiple times at a meeting, the starting order for the grid is decided by the finishing order of the previous race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

protecting and serving  Officer with a car pulled over. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

prototype  An endurance sports racing car that does not noticeably look like a standard production model. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

puke can  (drag racing) Radiator overflow tank, sometimes, used beer cans are used as puke cans, although, on some tracks, these types of modifications are considered illegal. A standard puke can is usually made of plastic, or some high strength polymer, and attached close to the radiator. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pulling an Eckman  A term in drag racing, particularly in Pro Stock, when a driver is cited, and fined for racing with a nitrous oxide system; driver Jerry Eckman was the first driver in the NHRA to be indefinitely suspended for such an infraction; he was reinstated after two years. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pumpkin/pumpkin roller  A Schneider National truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Push-to-Pass  System in which engine power is increased for short periods to create a short burst of extra speed. This can be done by increasing the boost pressure in a turbocharged car, increasing the maximum rpm, or using a separate system to provide power. Also, see KERS. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

push  Cornering behaviour where the front wheels do not follow the steered course but instead push out toward the outside of the turn. Known as push in NASCAR and other stock car racing. Opposite of oversteer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

pusholine  Fuel (usually Diesel, since large trucks seldom run on gasoline.) (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

put on the trailer  When a driver has either lost (got "put on the trailer") or won (put the other driver on the trailer). Named because losing drivers pull their vehicle home on a trailer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

qualifier  A qualifying race before the main event, where non-qualified cars compete for a predetermined number of spots in the main event. Some races have a C-main where the top finisher(s) qualify for the B-main. At those events, the main event is known as the "A-main". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

qualifying  The process of deciding the starting order of a race. See also pre-qualifying. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

quarter-panel  (or rear quarter panel) refers to the panel at the back sides starting at the rear edge of the rearmost doors, bordered by at top by the trunk (boot) lid and at bottom by the rear wheel arches ending at the rear bumper. This is the opposite of the fender. Literally, the term originally referred to the rear quarter or the car's length. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Queen City  Charlotte, North Carolina, Cincinnati, Ohio, Buffalo, New York or Springfield, Missouri. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Queer Town  Provincetown, MA or the San Francisco area. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Quick 8  (drag racing) Quickest eight cars in a defined race. Rules appear to can differ per location/race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

race director  An official appointed by a series organiser who holds ultimate authority over race operations throughout every event of a championship. The race director is the senior official present, and controls the activities of the local Clerk of the Course and marshals and the other staff appointed by the series. When appointed, they hold the responsibility of deploying the safety car and starting and stopping sessions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

racing back to the stand (or zone)  If two cabs drop off at the same spot, they might race back to our zone to get in line ahead of the other guy. Racing poses an interesting challenge, as the car is yellow and easy to see, plus the boss's phone number is on the side. Civilians like to call that number and complain. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

racing line  The fastest path around a circuit. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Radio Car  Either a marked or unmarked state trooper vehicle sporting additional antenna on the trunk or sides of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ragtop  Originally an open car like a roadster, but with a soft top (cloth top) that can be raised or lowered. Unlike a convertible, it had no roll-up side windows. Now often used as slang for a convertible. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

rail  Dragster (as distinct from bodied car or flopper). From the exposed frame rails of early cars. Usually refers to early short-wheelbase cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

rain visor  A window deflector is mounted above the doors of some automobiles, to protect the inside of the car from rain or other precipitation in case of slightly opened windows. Additionally, it may help to prevent precipitation entering the interior in case of an opened door, e.g. dropping from the roof or directly from the air. Deflectors are also fitted to sunroofs to deviate wind. It is also known as a "monsoonshield" or a "rain visor" (in countries without monsoon). The primary purpose of window deflectors is to prevent dust, snow, rain, other precipitation or excessive wind from entering to the cabin. Also, window deflectors direct air flows over the vehicle, and thus, reduce the wind noise when driving on moderate speeds. Window deflectors can be installed directly in the window channel or attached to the vehicle's body in the sunroof or side window area using 3M automotive-grade adhesive tape. Window deflectors are common accessory in the automotive aftermarket. Being vehicle-specific, they are normally designed to fit individual car, truck or SUV models. (Wikipedia: Window deflector)

rainout  When a race is delayed or cancelled due to rain, or the threat of rain. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

rake  The first application of the term "rake" in vehicles was probably the tilting back of the windshield's top. Nowadays rake refers to the angle between the overall vehicle and the horizontal axis of the ground. If the back is higher than the front, you have positive rake. If the front is higher than the back, you have negative rake. In early hot rod and custom cars, positive rake was created by varying tire size, and/or by suspension modification. In today's body design, positive rake is integral with some vehicles' styling, e.g. Mercedes E350 sedan, circa 2012/13. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

raking the leaves  The last person in the convoy, who would watch out for troopers coming from behind. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ramp run  In a practice lap, to rev the engine as far as possible without changing gears to allow engine management systems to take Lambda readings of the fuel to air ratio across a smooth engine revolution range. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

ratchetjaw  An obnoxious person talking non-stop and saying nothing. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

re-power  A truck taking a load from another truck that cannot make the destination. This is usually done if the original truck has broken down, the previous driver has run out of hours, or if the load has a long way to go and needs a team that can run with the load 24/7 and to get the load to the destination faster. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

reaction time  In drag racing, it refers to the time it takes for a driver to leave the starting line after the green light. This time can mean the difference between a win and loss, especially in closely matched races. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

reactive suspension  A system by which the suspension is controlled by computer to maintain an optimum distance above the racing surface, regardless of forces acting upon the car and changes in the racing surface, thus maximising the aerodynamic assistance that can be gained by running the car close to the ground. Developed originally by Team Lotus in Formula One. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

rear position lamps  Conspicuity for the rear of a vehicle is provided by rear position lamps (also called taillamps or tail lamps, taillights, or tail lights). These are required to produce only red light and to be wired such that they are lit whenever the front position lamps are lit, including when the headlamps are on. Rear position lamps may be combined with the vehicle's stop lamps or separate from them. In combined-function installations, the lamps produce brighter red light for the stop lamp function and dimmer red light for the rear position lamp function. Regulations worldwide stipulate minimum intensity ratios between the bright (stop) and dim (rear position) modes, so that a vehicle displaying rear position lamps will not be mistakenly interpreted as showing stop lamps, and vice versa. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

rear-facing-only seat  A child restraint system designed for use only by a young child in a rear-facing position. Also called an Infant car seat. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

rear-facing  Refers to the position where the child's car seat is turned to face the back of the vehicle. The rear-facing position supports the entire head, neck, and back, cradles and moves with the child to reduce stress to the neck and spinal cord in a crash. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

recalls  Voluntary or required actions taken by manufacturers in conjunction with NHTSA to correct problems or deficiencies after products have been distributed or sold. Manufacturers must offer free repair or replacement for products recalled for violations of safety standards. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

recline adjustor  Adjusts the angle of the car seat so the child is in the proper position in either the rear-facing or forward-facing position (when child has outgrown the seat limits for rear-facing use). (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

recovery point  A recovery point is a part of a car which can be used to recover the vehicle if it becomes stuck (bogged.) Recovering a vehicle using a recovery point involves attaching a winch or a snatch strap to the recovery point. Recovery points should be rated - that is, should say what load they are designed to take. Using non-rated parts of a vehicle to recover it can be extremely dangerous.Recovery points may be fitted by the manufacturer, or as an after-market modification. (Wikipedia: Recovery point)

Red Wheel  Police patrol car with single rotating red roof light, such as those used by the Michigan State Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

redlight  (drag racing) a.k.a. bulb—jump the start, left before tree turned green. This is a loss unless a more serious (opponent crossing the center boundary line) foul occurs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

redlighted  (drag racing) a.k.a. bulb—jumped the start, left before tree turned green. This is a loss unless a more serious (opponent crossing the center boundary line) foul occurs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

reefer  A refrigerated trailer, used for transporting foodstuffs and other perishable cargo. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

regenerative shock absorber  A regenerative shock absorber is a type of shock absorber that converts parasitic intermittent linear motion and vibration into useful energy, such as electricity. Conventional shock absorbers simply dissipate this energy as heat. When used in an electric vehicle or hybrid electric vehicle the electricity generated by the shock absorber can be diverted to its powertrain to increase battery life. In non-electric vehicles the electricity can be used to power accessories such as air conditioning. Several different systems have been developed recently, though they are still in stages of development and not installed on production vehicles. (Wikipedia: Regenerative shock absorber)

registration card  A postage-paid return card that comes with every car seat; should be returned to the manufacturer so owners can be notified of any recalls. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

relief driver  A driver who fills in for another driver in case of injury, or during a race because of exhaustion or pain. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

resin casting  A method of creating parts for model cars using synthetic resin.  The synthetic resin for such processes is a monomer for making plastic thermosetting polymer.  During the setting process, the liquid monomer polymerizes into the polymer, thereby hardening into a solid. (Wikipedia)  This method is used for small scale, often home-based production due to its low initial investment.

restart  The race is started again after a caution or other condition that stopped the race. In the case of a restart from a caution period on an oval track and most road courses, this is accomplished by the safety car pulling off the track, the green flag/light being displayed, and cars simply accelerating back to race speeds. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

retractable hardtop  Also Coupé convertible or Coupé Cabriolet. A type of convertible forgoing a foldable textile roof in favor of a multi-segment rigid roof retracts into the lower bodywork. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

retractor  A mechanism that works with the seat belts to gather and store extra seat belt webbing. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Revellogram  A portmanteau of Revell and Monogram, referring to model kits that were at one time co-branded "Revell-Monongram."

reverse grid racing  When the starting order of a race is reversed, so that the driver on pole position, starts last. Occasionally reverse grid is limited to only part of the grid, for example, just the top ten positions may be reversed. Often used to increase the entertainment value of a race, mainly used when a category races several times over the course of a meeting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Richie Roach  Someone in a limousine. Taken from comments made by Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity regarding liberals riding in limousines. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ride theft  Stealing a fare from another cabbie. A driver will hear a bell come across the radio, know the position of the car who got the bell, and beat him to the pickup. Obviously, this is a smuggled ride. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

riding mechanic  An early term for a co-driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

riding mechanic  In the early days of automobile racing, race cars had a second seat for a mechanic who would monitor the car and keep watch over the driver's shoulder.  Also referred in terminology of the times as a "riding mechanician."

rifle barrel  A bulk liquid trailer round in shape. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Rip-off Ralphy  A truck stop dope dealer who charges extremely high prices. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ripple strip  Concrete kerb, usually placed on the inside of a corner, painted in chunks of colour, usually red and white alternately, hence the 'ripple'. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

roach coach  Lunch wagon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

road course ringer  (NASCAR) A driver who generally competes only on road courses as a substitute for a team's primary driver. Such drivers are no longer used by top teams in the Sprint Cup Series due to competition changes in the 21st century, but are still frequently used by lower-tier Cup teams and teams in other NASCAR series. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Road Ho/Road Juliet  A female escort usually found at truck stops and rest areas. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Road Pizza  An animal that has been run over and flattened on the pavement. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

roadster  An open vehicle, usually with 2 doors, with a removable and/or retractable cloth top and a windshield characterized by the lack of integrated glass side windows. Contemporary uses of this name do not always follow this original description. A classical roadster is a two-seater with a long hood and a short back, which means the driver is sitting in the rear of the vehicle (close to the rear axle). Usually it is a rear-wheel-driven car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

rock sliders  Rock sliders are an aftermarket accessory popular among four wheel drive vehicle owners who engage in more serious off-road driving. Rock sliders are typically made of heavy-duty box section steel, although they can also be made from tubular steel as well. They run along each side of the vehicle, from just behind the front wheel to just before the rear wheel, just below the level of the door sills. They are affixed to the vehicle's chassis, and their function is to protect the door sills and door bottoms from damage when crossing large obstacles (such as rocks - hence the name). (Wikipedia: Rock sliders)

rocker rail  Body armor protecting the Rocker, found mostly in off road vehicles. Term coined by engineers at MetalCloak. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

rocker  The body section below the base of the door openings sometimes called the "rocker panels", or "sills". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

roll cage  Network of metal bars that criss-cross the interior of production-based sedan-bodied racing cars. Originally created as a safety device in more recent times it has been used to connect suspension, chassis, engine to substantially increase the torsional rigidity of a race car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

roll hoop  Looped bar protruding above and behind the drivers helmets in open wheel and prototype sports racing cars. The hoop is placed that in the event of a car rolling over in a crash the car lands on the roll hoop rather than the drivers helmet. It also makes a handy hook for cranes for removing stopped cars from dangerous positions on the circuit. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

rollerskate  A compact or sports car, or mini pickup truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

rollin' coal  (also rolling coal, coal rolling)  Driving while ejecting a large amount of black diesel exhaust.  So named because it resembles the dirty exhaust of an old coal-fired smoke stack on wheels.  Occasionally used as a protest of environmentalism.

rolling refinery  A tank truck carrying fuel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

rolling start  A starting method where moving cars start a race after the starter displays a green flag. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

roof flap  An aerodynamic piece designed to keep a car on the ground when it is traveling in reverse. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

roof module  A roof module is a complete top for a convertible. Such tops can be a softtop or a retractable hardtop which is produced by specialized convertible top suppliers and supplied to the OEMs. The OEMs finally are completing their cars in their own production lines with these tops to a convertible. Depending on the OEM it is possible that these suppliers are working as a full service vehicle supplier and are producing the complete cars (e.g. Karmann, Heuliez or Pininfarina). Car Top Systems, Edscha and OASys (Automotive) are not full service vehicle suppliers and are delivering just the top to the OEMs. (Wikipedia: Roof module)

roof rack  A roof rack is a set of bars secured to the roof of a motor car. It is used to carry bulky items such as luggage, bicycles, canoes, kayaks, skis, or various carriers and containers. There is a long history of the use of roof racks and their designs. They allow users of an automobile to transport objects on the roof of the vehicle without reducing interior space for occupants, or the cargo area volume limits such as in the typical car's trunk design. The three most common components of a roof rack system are (side) rails (or tracks), towers which clamp or otherwise attach to the rails, and mounts, which secure the bulky items to the rack system. Older roof racks were usually mounted directly to the gutter surrounding the roof line. More modern vehicles, which do not have gutters, can often have a roof rack installed by attaching hooks to the top of the door frames. Some automobiles have fittings for proprietary racks which mate with reinforced lugs in the roof. Other vehicles have a factory-installed permanent roof rack. Roof racks increase air resistance and in the US, roof racks increased overall fuel consumption by approximately 1%. Truck bed rack is a derivation of a roof rack designed to be installed over the bed of a pickup truck. The construction of a bed rack is very similar to a roof rack, but features tall tubes (legs) that allow to lift the rack platform higher above the bed surface and leave space for cargo inside of the bed. Truck bed racks are often used in a combination with roof racks and form a long cargo platform that allows transportation of oversized items. They are commonly used in constructions and recreation as a base for various gear and tents just like the roof racks. (Wikipedia: Roof rack)

roof tent  A roof tent is an accessory which may be fitted to the roof of a motor vehicle which allows the users to sleep in relative safety and comfort above the vehicle, and leaves the internal load-space free. The first example of roof-tents appeared in Western Europe in the 1930s. Roof tents are particularly seen on expedition-prepared four wheel drive vehicles such as Land Rovers, but can be fitted to almost any vehicle. Generally they will mount to a vehicles roof rack or aftermarket roof bars. They are particularly popular in Italy and one manufacturer advertises them using photographs of their devices fitted to cars as small as the Fiat Panda. (Wikipedia: Roof tent)

roost  In off-road racing, the act of accelerating quickly in a corner to kick up dirt, dust, and rocks, usually in an effort to temporarily blind a trailing driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

rooster tail  A spray of water that comes from the back of a car driving rapidly across wet pavement.  The shape of the spray, as viewed from the side, resembles the shape of a rooster's tail.

Rottenchester  Rochester, NY. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

rubber duck  The first vehicle in a convoy. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

rubbernecker  Vehicles that further slow down or impede already congested traffic by rotating their heads 180 degrees to view the accident or traffic incident and not paying attention to the road ahead. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

rubbing strip  Plastic/rubber line or moulding to prevent side-swiping along the doors. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

rumble strip  Variation of ripple strip with an upward-pointed, rounded saw-tooth edge. The saw-tooth effect is to discourage competitors from kerb-hopping. The saw-tooth creates a rumble sound and feel for the competitor when driven over. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

run-off area  Areas off the track put aside for vehicles to leave the track in case of emergency without accident. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

running board  A running board is a narrow step fitted under the side doors of a car or truck. It aids entry, especially into high vehicles, and is typical of vintage cars, which had much higher ground clearances than today's vehicles. It is also used as a fashion statement on vehicles that would not otherwise require it. The origin of the name running board is obscure; the first running boards predate automobiles and were installed on carriages as early as the 17th century. Whether the running board was named after the inventor or in reference to function is open to debate. In the early 20th century, all automobiles were equipped with running boards. The necessity of using them was caused by the fact that first cars were designed with a narrow, high body bolted to the chassis. A running board served as a step to a vehicle's cabin and was wide enough to serve as a place to sit or even lie down for an adult. During the 1920s and 1930s, car design was evolving rapidly to become more sleek and aerodynamic. It eliminated the need for running boards. The first automobile designed without running boards was the 1936 Cord. It changed the attitude towards running boards for many years ahead.(Wikipedia: Running board)

Rustang  A derogatory nickname for a Ford Mustang.

Safe Driving Award  Traffic ticket while being pulled over by police or the DOT. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

safety belt  See seat belt. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

safety car  A safety car or pace car limits the speed of competing cars on a racetrack in the case of an accident or caution periods caused by obstruction/s on the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

sage line  A crease or curvature in the side of the body used to create visual drama. Sometimes the crease is functional and improves rigidity of the outer body. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

Sail Boat  Viking Freight. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

salt shaker  A snowplow. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Salty  Salt Lake City, Utah (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sandbag  To gain a competitive advantage by deliberately underperforming at an event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

sandbagging  Not participating in conversation but listening only, despite having the capability of speaking. This is not the same as listening in using a simple receiver, as the person doing this activity can transmit using the two-way radio, but chooses not to. It is done to monitor people for entertainment or for gathering information about the actions of others. Often, CBer's will sandbag to listen to others' responses to their previous input to a conversation, sometimes referred to a "reading the mail." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sandtrap  An area at the very end of a dragstrip to slow down and stop vehicles that have gone off the track, it is filled with, as the name implies, sand. The design of the sandtrap is intentional, and used as a safety device. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

satellite team  A second racing team either operated by or in partnership with a larger team but maintaining a separate identity. The team may share vehicles and technology with the main operation, or may develop the careers of upcoming drivers, such as Scuderia Toro Rosso. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Scale City  Toledo, Ohio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

scattershield  A bellhousing or external shield surrounding a bellhousing, and designed to contain metal fragments in the event of clutch and/or flywheel failure. The term also refers a metal shield intended to contain fragments in case of catastrophic transmission failure. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Schneider Eggs  Orange barrels filled with sand at construction sites to serve as a protective barrier for construction workers against moving traffic. The term is a reference to Schneider, a large trucking company known for its orange-painted trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

scoop  Any inset or protusion that implies the intake of air. May be functional for cooling/ventilation or purely ornamental. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design) Inset or protusion that implies the intake of air. May be functional for cooling/ventilation or purely ornamental. Also Shaker scoop. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

scorching  A century-old term for driving through a populated area at excessive speed.  Can be thought of the Brass Era version of the word "hoon."

scowling headlamps  Headlamps styled along a V-shape as viewed from the front, giving the impression of a scowl. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

scratch race  A type of race which competitors start on an equal term. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

scrub  Also known as the Bubba Scrub; a jump technique in motocross in which the rider transfer their weight to the bike sideways at the face of the jump for a lower trajectory which decreases time spent in the air. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

scrutineer  A qualified official who examines racing vehicles pre-race for compliance with the rules of competition, usually in a scrutineering bay adjacent to the pit lane. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

scuffs  Tires which have been used limitedly, but are not worn out. Scuffs may be put on a car during a pit stop to improve handling. At times, brand new tires may be 'scuffed in' before a race by practicing in them for a lap or two. (See "Sticker tires") (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

scuttle shake  Scuttle shake (sometimes called cowl shake in the US) is the term used for the phenomenon experienced in many convertible or open top automobiles where, due to lower structural rigidity caused by the lack of a roof, the middle section of the chassis flexes, causing the bulkhead in front of the passenger compartment to move and vibrate when the vehicle is subject to uneven road surfaces. Passengers feel it as a noticeable vibration and shudder. (Wikipedia: Scuttle shake)

Seat Belt Syndrome  A range of symptoms that might occur as a result of the seat belt doing its job in a crash or sudden braking. Children should be buckled in with a lap and shoulder belt, to provide upper body protection. If a child uses a lap belt only, he or she can suffer internal organ injuries and injuries to the lumbar spine (lower back). (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

seat belt  The webbing, anchor, and buckle system that restrains a passenger or car seat in a vehicle; also known as a safety belt. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

seat cover  A attractive female passenger in a vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sector  A section of one complete lap of the circuit used for timing purposes. For the purposes of Formula One, each circuit is split into three sectors. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

sedan delivery  North American term for a vehicle similar to a wagon but without side windows, similar to a panel truck but with two doors (one on each side), and one or two rear doors. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

sedan  A car seating four or more with a fixed roof that is full-height up to the rear window. Known in British English as a saloon. Sedans can have 2 or 4-doors. This is the most common body style. In the U.S., this term has been used to denote a car with fixed window frames, as opposed to the hardtop style wherein the sash, if any, winds down with the glass. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

semi-automatic gearbox  A motorsport application, created initially by Scuderia Ferrari for Formula One, in which the driver can change gears manually, but without having to manually activate the clutch. On open wheel race cars it is usually activated by paddles immediately behind the steering wheel, although touring cars and rally usually place the gear shifter as a gear stick in the more conventional position on the centre console, but occasionally is mounted as a stalk off the steering column, when activated, automatically engages the clutch and changes the gear and releases the clutch without any further input from the driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

semi-feature  A qualifying race before the main event, where non-qualified cars compete for a predetermined number of spots in the main event. Some races have a C-main where the top finisher(s) qualify for the B-main. At those events, the main event is known as the "A-main". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

set of joints  A semi truck pulling two or more trailers in tandem. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

setup  The set of adjustments made to the vehicle in order to optimize its behavior. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Sewer City  Sioux City, Iowa, so nicknamed because I-29 ran near infamous Sioux City Stockyards. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Sex Lights  Got pulled over. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

shakedown  The first test of a new vehicle. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

shaker hood  A hood on a front-engine car where a section of the hood is connected to the top of the air cleaner rather than the rest of the hood, which is connected to the body.  The motion of the engine in its motor mounts makes this section of the hood "shake" when the engine is revved.

ShakeyLiner  A Freightliner Trucks tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

shaking the trees  The person in the lead in a convoy watching out for troopers up ahead. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Shakotan  Shakotan literally means “low car” and is used mainly for indicating extremely lowered streetcars with wings and big exhausts tips. (What is bosozoku?)

Shakytown  Los Angeles, so nicknamed because of the earthquakes that occur there. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

shanty shaker  Mobile home hauler. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

shaved doors  Shaved doors refers to a vehicle whose doors do not have handles on the outside of the vehicle in order to present in a smooth, clean, look. It was pioneered by legendary customiser Harry Westergard in California. The modification also increases security as there is no keyhole to pick or handle to grab. Often called autolocs, or autoloc doors, after a popular manufacturer of such doors. They are popular on hot rods, street rods, muscle cars, tuned cars (mostly Japanese), trucks, and mini trucks. It is also a traditional modification on many lead sleds, dating back to the 1940s. A solenoid is used to open the door. This solenoid can be triggered by button or remote. They can also be opened mechanically with a hidden cable release. (Wikipedia: Shaved doors)

shell  A camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)

shell  Molded plastic and/or metal structure of car seat or booster seat. Also called frame. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

shift kit  A shift kit is a set of components for automobiles designed to improve how well the car shifts between gears. Kits are made for both automatic and manual transmissions. Shifts may be optimized for different goals. Some drivers want slow, smooth shifts for comfort, while others want quick shifts for performance or towing.For manual transmission equipped cars, it is a component that replaces the stock gear selector (shifter). A shift kit usually shortens the throws of selecting a gear (also known as a short throw shift), therefore allowing a driver to reduce the shift time and change gears more efficiently. An automatic transmission's main focus is smooth shifting between gears. To accomplish this it often goes into two gears at once while shifting up, which is known as a shift overlap. In these cars, it is a kit that can reduce or eliminate the shift overlap. It will also reduce wear because the transmission won't be trying to drive in two gears at once. (Wikipedia: Shift kit)

shift light  A shift light is a warning lamp fitted to vehicles in order to indicate to the driver that maximum RPM has almost been reached. Ideally a shift lamp will illuminate at the engine speed beyond that which delivers the maximum BHP such that the BHP before and after shifting is the same. Accelerating the engine beyond this point is not conducive to rapid acceleration. In use a shift light allows the driver to judge the exact point that a gear change should be carried out without having to glance down at the tachometer. This also increases safety for the driver by keeping his focus on the track at all times. Beginning in the early 1980s, many United States-market vehicles equipped with a manual transmission began to have shift lights as standard equipment; these would usually signal for an upshift at an engine speed that provided maximum fuel efficiency, lower than the ideal engine speed for maximum BHP. The reason for this was, for a time EPA fuel economy testing rules stipulated that shift lights would be followed on vehicles so equipped- thus, they were calibrated for optimum fuel mileage on the EPA test cycle. Some in the 1980s even had buzzers to alert the driver it was at a certain rpm. (Wikipedia: Shift light)

shooting brake  Once a vehicle designed to carry hunters and sportsmen; now a station wagon or vehicle combining features of a station wagon and a coupe. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

shootout  A selection procedure in which the ten or 15 fastest qualifiers compete for grid positions in a single-lap effort without other vehicles on the track. While not specifically referenced, most NASCAR races will use this style of qualifying for all cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

short block  A short block is an engine sub-assembly comprising the portion of the cylinder block below the head gasket but above the oil pan. An in-block cam engine includes the camshaft, timing gear, and any balance shafts. Overhead cam engines don't include those parts. (Wikipedia: Short block)

Short North  The engineering nickname for the Oldsmobile LX5 V6, so named because it was a shortened version of the Northstar V8. (see also: Shortstar)

short shifting  A technique used, primarily in motorsport, to regain control of a car through a high speed corner. Involves the driver shifting up a gear earlier than usual. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Shortstar  A common nickname for the Oldsmobile LX5 V6, so named because it was a shortened version of the Northstar V8. (see also: Short North)

shot rodder  Mid-1960's slang term for a street racer, a variant of "hot rodder." (Hot Rods and Racing Cars #70 - September 1964)

shoulder line  The line or "shoulder" formed by the meeting of top and side surfaces extending from hood/fender shoulder to boot-lid/quarter-panel shoulder. The strongest example of this feature can be found on more modern of Volvo Cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

shunt  A crash. Usually side to side contact. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

shutdown area  In drag racing, it is the extra 440 yards from the finish line, to the sand trap, used to safely shut down the car, and turn it off the track, so the next racers can begin their race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

shutting down halfway  Same as 10-10 (no longer talking, but still listening). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Siamese bores  An engine block's cylinders if there are no water passages between them.

side marker lights  In the US, amber front and red rear side marker lamps and retroreflectors are required. The law initially required lights or retroreflectors on vehicles made after 1 January 1968. This was amended to require lights and retroreflectors on vehicles made after 1 January 1970. These side-facing devices make the vehicle's presence, position and direction of travel clearly visible from oblique angles. The lights are wired so as to illuminate whenever the vehicles' parking and taillamps are on, including when the headlamps are being used. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

side turn signals  In most countries, cars must be equipped with side-mounted turn signal repeaters to make the turn indication visible laterally (i.e. to the sides of the vehicle) rather than just to the front and rear of the vehicle. These are permitted, but not required in the US. As an alternative in both the United States and Canada, the front amber side marker lights may be wired to flash with the turn signals, but this also is not mandatory. In recent years, many automakers have been incorporating side turn signal devices into the side view mirror housings, rather than mounting them on the vehicle's fenders. Some evidence suggests these mirror-mounted turn signals may be more effective than fender-mounted items. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

sidebander  A CB station using SSB modulation. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sidepod  Aerodynamic device to improve airflow between front and rear wheels on open wheel racing car which also covers ancillary equipment within car, most often water radiators which are air cooled by ram scoops at the open front of the sidepods. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Signal 7  A dead carcass. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Signal Pirate  (NASCAR) A driver who regularly races in the first tier NASCAR series, the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, who makes guest or semi-regular appearances racing in the second-tier NASCAR Xfinity Series. The term was named originally for then sponsor of the second-tier series Anheuser-Busch brewery. Claim Jumper was a reference to second-tier sponsor Nationwide Insurance (2008–14), and Signal Pirate references current second-tier sponsor Comcast Xfinity. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

sill line  Imaginary line drawn following the bottom edge of the greenhouse glass. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

sill  The body section below the base of the door openings sometimes called the "rocker panels", or "rockers". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

silver seeder  A combine harvester built by Gleaner Manufacturing Company. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

simcon  A type of roof where soft cloth is laid over a hard roof, but includes metal framing that simulates the framing of a soft convertible top. The name is a portmanteau of "simulated convertible."

single-leading-shoe drum brake  The single-leading-shoe drum brake (SLS), a.k.a. "leading/trailing drum brake", is a basic type of drum brake design. The term "leading/trailing" means that only one shoe is "leading", moving into the rotation of the drum and thus exhibiting a self-servo (or self-applying) effect. The leading shoe is "dragged" into the friction surface of the drum and thus achieving greater braking force. The other shoe is "trailing", moving against the direction of rotation, is thrown away from the friction surface of the drum and is far less effective. An advantage of an SLS brake is that is equally effective whether the vehicle is travelling forwards or in reverse. When the vehicle is moving in reverse, the role of the leading and trailing shoes is switched. What would be the leading shoe when the vehicle is travelling forwards becomes the trailing shoe, and vice versa. (Wikipedia: Single-leading-shoe drum brake)

sipe a tire  To use a razor blade to cut a tire's thread causing the rubber to break off. Grooving or Cutting a tire means to use a tool to add additional grooves to a tire to adjust handling for a track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

six line  A line extending from the C-pillar down and around the rear wheel well. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

sixthlight  Also called Quarter Glass. Fixed glass located in between the side-door and boot. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

skateboard  A flatbed truck or trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

skid plate  Metal plates, most commonly titanium, fixed to the bottom of flat bottomed racing cars on the undertray facing the racing surface, put there to protect the undertray from ground strikes tearing through the undertray. Today less common as racing cars usually are mandated to have a ground clearance that is less critical to hitting the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

skillet face  A cab over engine truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sled  In truck and tractor pulling, an implement pulled behind the machine which uses friction to stop the machine. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

sleeper leaper  Prostitute, especially one that frequents truck stops. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

slick  A phenomenon caused on short-circuit clay ovals that dry out too much. Clay circuits that do not maintain a certain amount of moisture as a race meeting progresses will start to wear the rubber off the soft specialised clay surface tyres of clay surface race car tyres much in the same way asphalt or concrete paved circuits do, giving the track surface a noticeably black shade. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

slick  A tyre with no tread pattern, maximising the amount of tyre rubber in contact with the racing surface. A specialist motor racing application as in wet weather conditions these tyres have little resistance to aquaplaning. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

slidejob  Especially in dirt oval racing, a passing car dives low into a corner, deliberately oversteers in front of the vehicle being passed in an attempt to slow their momentum. The vehicle being passed often attempts to pass back by steering low coming out of the corner down the following straightaway. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

slingshot pass  A pass using slipstreaming/drafting to gain speed. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

slingshot  Front-engined dragster, named for the driving position behind the rear wheels (erroneously attributed to launch speed). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

slipstreaming  A car following close behind another uses the slipstream created by the lead car to close the gap between them or pass it. Same as drafting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

small family car  Small family/compact cars refer to the hatchbacks and shortest saloons and estate cars with similar size. They are approximately 4,250 mm (167 in) long in case of hatchbacks and 4,500 mm (177 in) in the case of saloons and estate cars. Compact cars have room for five adults and usually have engines between 1.4 and 2.2 litres, but some have engines of up to 2.5 litres. Some early "muscle" compacts had optional V8 engines of up to 6.6 liters. These are the most popular vehicles in most developed countries. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Smart Air Bag System  Also known as advanced air bags. A smart air bag system detects when a child is present and automatically deactivates the air bag or enables it to deploy safely. Manufacturers who do not provide a qualifying "smart" system would be required to have new and more prominent air bag warning labels inside the vehicle. Manufacturers would also be permitted to install cutoff switches so parents can deactivate the passenger air bag when a child is seated in front of it. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

smokey in a plain brown wrapper  A law officer in an unmarked police car. The term "plain white wrapper" is sometimes used, depending on the color of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

smokey in the bush  A speed trap. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

smokey on four legs  Royal Canadian Mounted Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

smokey taking pictures  A law officer monitoring traffic with a radar gun. Today, this can also refer to an automated speed camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

smokey  A law officer, particularly one from a state police or highway Patrol force. A "smokey report" is what CB users say when they have information on a law officer, such as location or current activities. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

smoking the tires  Also called Lighting the hides, or Blowing the tires off. A term used mostly in drag racing when a loss of traction occurs, causing the rear tires to rise, and smoke profusely. This usually happens off the starting line. When this happens during a race, it usually results in a loss, unless the opponent also loses traction as well. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

smuggling  Driving customers without notifying dispatch. A driver can get a free ride this way, without losing his place in line. Most drivers dishonest enough to smuggle will only do so if no other cabs are in sight, for fear of getting busted. Some do it anyway, and if another driver complains on the radio, they radio in, "I forgot to mention I got a flag going from A to B" or "Didn't I call that in?" (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

snake in the grass  Police car radar usually hidden amongst tall cat tails. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

snowcoach  A small motorcoach bus with four small tracks instead of wheels. Used in Yellowstone National Park for tourist transportation in wintertime.

snug harness  Harness straps that do not allow slack; the strap lies in a relatively straight line without sagging yet does not press into the child's shoulders creating an indentation. You should not be able to pinch the webbing vertically. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

soft top  A convertible top which is made out of flexible materials like PVC or textile. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

soldier man  Truck carrying Hummers, soldiers, even Tanks, other military equipment. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sow belly  A milk truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

spare car  A car used by a driver if he has damaged his main car. It may or may not have the same setup as the primary car. Now banned in Formula One for cost-cutting reasons, though teams in many other major racing series have a spare car available at the track. At Indianapolis, it is traditionally called a "T Car" ("T" loosely short for "training") (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

spats  Side covers for wheel arches, hiding the wheel - usually rear only. Also called Fender skirts. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

special stage  A section of road or track, closed off used for timed runs in rallying. A rally is made up of a number of special stages. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

speed trap  A location where police frequently ticket drivers exceeding the speed limit, often chosen for locations where police cars can be concealed at the roadside and where people frequently exceed the speed limit.  Derisively used to refer to towns where they are viewed as being exceedingly strict on speed limits for the purpose of generating revenue for the town from drivers passing through.

spiffs  Slang for "customer incentives, cash discounts, low-or no-interest loans and other inducements to buy new vehicles." Source: John Birchard 2004

spin turn  A semi-doughnut which a driver use to turn themselves to a correct position on a tight space without the need of a reverse gear. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

spindle  In an automobile, the spindle is a part of the suspension system that carries the hub for the wheel and attaches to the upper and lower control arms. The spindle is referred to as an upright in UK-built vehicles and in areas dominated by cars designed for the UK, like Australia, New Zealand etc. (Wikipedia: Spindle (automobile))

splash and go  A pit stop which involves refueling the car only, often less than a full tank. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

splitter  Also known as a front diffuser, a flat horizontal surface at the lower edge of a front bumper that assists in creating downforce.

splitter  Also referred to as the front Spoiler, Front Air Dam, or Diffuser. Aerodynamic device placed on the nose of some touring cars and GTs to improve airflow around the nose of the car and sometimes create downforce for the front wheels to aid steering. It is prominent on NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow body style. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

spoiler  A raised lip or wing which is used to 'spoil' unfavorable air movement across the body. Some designs are more functional than others. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

spoiler  Aerodynamic device attached to the trailing edge of a race car to increase its rear downforce. The difference between a spoiler and a wing is that wings are generally multi-element with air passing both above and below the aerodynamic surface, whereas a spoiler is flush fitted to the car's bodywork. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

sport utility vehicle  Sport utility vehicles are off-road vehicles with four-wheel drive and true off-road capability. They most often feature high ground clearance and an upright, boxy body design. Sport Utilities are typically defined by a body on frame construction which offers more off-road capability but reduced on-road ride comfort and handling compared to a cross-over or car based utility vehicle. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

sportbrake  A combination sports car/shooting brake, or a performance-oriented shooting brake style car.

sports car  The term "sports car" does not appear to have a clear definition. It is commonly used to describe vehicles which prioritise acceleration and handling; however, some people claim it is also defined as a vehicle with two seats. A Sports car (sportscar or sport car) is a small, usually two-seat, two-door automobile designed for spirited performance and nimble handling. Sports cars may be spartan or luxurious but high maneuverability and minimum weight are requisite. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

sports saloon  These are high-performance versions of saloons. Sometimes originally homologated for production based motorsports (touring cars or rally cars) and like regular saloons, seats four or five people. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

sports sedan  These are high-performance versions of saloons. Sometimes originally homologated for production based motorsports (touring cars or rally cars) and like regular saloons, seats four or five people. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

spot lights  Police cars, emergency vehicles, and those competing in road rallies are sometimes equipped with an auxiliary lamp, sometimes called an alley light, in a swivel-mounted housing attached to one or both a-pillars, directable by a handle protruding through the pillar into the vehicle. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

spotter  A person, positioned high above the circuit, who communicates what going on the track to the driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

SpringFAILd  Springfield, Illinois. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

spy in the sky  A police aircraft. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

spyder  Similar to a roadster but originally with less weather protection. Nowadays it simply means a convertible with two seater only. The name comes from the old carriages with two seats and no roof, whose small central cabin and big wheels at the corners are reminiscent of a spider. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

stagger  The difference in circumference between the left and right tires. It is used to make a racing car turn easier on oval tracks. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

staggered wheel fitment  The front and rear wheels are different widths. On sporty rear wheel drive cars, the rear tires are usually wider than the front. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

standard tree  (drag racing) Timing lights which flash in sequence five tenths of a second between each yellow light before turning green. Traditional form, before introduction of pro tree. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

standing start  A starting method where the race machines are stationary on the grid. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Star City  Roanoke, Virginia, named after the Roanoke Star. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

start and park  A team or driver who starts a race and only runs a small number of laps to avoid using up resources (tires, parts, pit crew, etc...). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

static caravan  A trailer-based housing unit that is set in one place, the British English version of the term "mobile home."

station hack  An early type of vehicle named after a type of wagon (hack) that was designed to carry people and their luggage to a train station. Would later evolve into the term "station wagon."

station wagon  A station wagon (also known as an estate or estate car) is an automobile with a body style variant of a sedan/saloon with its roof extended rearward over a shared passenger/cargo volume with access at the back via a third or fifth door (the liftgate or tailgate), instead of a trunk lid. The body style transforms a standard three-box design into a two-box design—to include an A, B, and C-pillar, as well as a D-pillar. Station wagons can flexibly reconfigure their interior volume via fold-down rear seats to prioritize either passenger or cargo volume. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

station wagon  American term for an estate car, a car where a substantial portion of the rear of the car is enclosed as part of the passenger cabin. The name evolved from "station hack."

steak on the grill  To hit a cow. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

steering column  The automotive steering column is a device intended primarily for connecting the steering wheel to the steering mechanism or transferring the driver's input torque from the steering wheel. A steering column may also perform the following secondary functions: energy dissipation management in the event of a frontal collision; provide mounting for: the multi-function switch, column lock, column wiring, column shroud(s), transmission gear selector, gauges or other instruments as well as the electro motor and gear units found in EPAS and SbW systems; offer (height and/or length) adjustment to suit driver preference(Wikipedia: Steering column)

steering wheel holder  An inexperienced or poor driver. The Term is meant to be a demoted version of a truck driver because the person is "not worthy" of being called a truck driver. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

steward  The adjudicator or referee at a race meeting who interprets incidents and decides whether penalties or fines should be issued. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Sticker Patch  Phoenix, Arizona. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sticker tires  Brand new tires put on a race car. Nicknamed "sticker tires" because the manufacturer's labels are still visible. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Stink City  Las Cruces, New Mexico earned this name because a sewage treatment plant was placed right next to Interstate 10 and near several truck stops. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

stint  The period a driver is at the wheel in an event involving more than one driver in the vehicle. Sometimes refers to the period of driving between pit stops. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

stop lamps  Red steady-burning rear lights, brighter than the rear position lamps, are activated when the driver applies the vehicle's brakes. These are called stop lamps in some countries and brake lights in others. They are required to be fitted in multiples of two, symmetrically at the left and right edges of the rear of every vehicle. International UN regulations specify a range of acceptable intensity for a stop lamp of 60 to 185 candela. In North America where the UN regulations are not recognised, the acceptable range for a single-compartment stop lamp is 80 to 300 candela. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

stop-go penalty  A penalty assessed to a driver for an on-track infraction that requires them to enter their pit box (or in some cases a special penalty pit box) and come to a complete stop before resuming. No work is allowed to be done on the car during the penalty, even if it is being served in the driver's own pit box. Doing work on the car would negate the serving of the penalty, and the penalty would have to be re-served the next time around. In some cases, the car is held in the box for a specified number of seconds before being allowed to resume. Sometimes called a Stop and go penalty. Since the early/mid-1990s, this penalty has seen less use, and is instead typically replaced by the Drive-through penalty. The drive-through penalty requires a driver to enter and drive through the pit road (below the pit road speed limit), before returning to the track. When pit lane speed limits became standard in motorsport in the early 1990s, the drive-through penalty was deemed sufficient, while stop-go penalties (when coupled with the now slow pit speed limits) were now considered excessive. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

strake  Crease in the sheet metal intended as a "speed line" styling feature. Exemplified in the doors of the Ferrari Testarossa. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

stretching your hood  Lying to dispatch about your location. Examples include saying you're closer to an incoming call than you actually are. Another is saying you're clear well in advance of clearing, which lets you get in line (virtual line maintained by dispatch) earlier. Also, drivers will claim to be entering one of our pickup zones when they're still miles away -- same reason, we get in line upon returning to our pickup zones. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

stripe  The start/finish line. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

struck the tires  (drag racing) Loss of traction, causing them to smoke. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

stub axle  A stub axle is one of the two front axles that carries a wheel in a rear wheel drive vehicle. The axle is capable of limited angular movement about the kingpin for steering the vehicle. The stub axle consists of wheel bearings which support the wheel hub. The stub axle is named so because it resembles the shape of a stub, like a truncated end of an axle, short in shape and blunt. There are four following method those are 1. Elliot strub axle 2. Reversed elliot 3. Lemoine 4. Lemoine inverted (Wikipedia: Stub axle)

Stump Town  Portland, Oregon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

subcompact car  This class is known as supermini in the UK, subcompact in North America. Superminis have three, four or five doors, and even as an estate shape. They are designed to seat four passengers comfortably. Current supermini hatchbacks are approximately 3900 mm long, while saloons and estate cars are around 4200 mm long. Currently (2013) sedan variants are generally not available in Europe and are marketed at a lower price than hatchback models in North America. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

subframe  A subframe is a structural component of a vehicle, such as an automobile or an aircraft, that uses a discrete, separate structure within a larger body-on-frame or unit body to carry certain components, such as the engine, drivetrain, or suspension. The subframe is bolted and/or welded to the vehicle. When bolted, it is sometimes equipped with rubber bushings or springs to dampen vibration. The principal purposes of using a subframe are, to spread high chassis loads over a wide area of relatively thin sheet metal of a monocoque body shell, and to isolate vibration and harshness from the rest of the body. For example, in an automobile with its powertrain contained in a subframe, forces generated by the engine and transmission can be damped enough that they will not disturb passengers. As a natural development from a car with a full chassis, separate front and rear subframes are used in modern vehicles to reduce the overall weight and cost. In addition a subframe yields benefits to production in that subassemblies can be made which can be introduced to the main bodyshell when required on an automated line. (Wikipedia: Subframe)

success ballast  A method used to level performance between competitors by adding weight to cars the win races or are successful. Somestimes referred to as Lead trophy as the usage of lead bars is most popular in applying the additional weight. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

suds and mud  Beer and coffee (with cream/milk in it), served at some truck stops and restaurants. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

suicide door  Rear-hinged type, opening from the front of the car. If accidentally opened while driving at a high speed, doors would be blown backward. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

suicide jockey  A truck carrying explosives. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sun visor  A sun visor is a component of an automobile located on the interior just above the windshield (also known as the windscreen). They are designed with a hinged flap that is adjustable to help shade the eyes of drivers and passengers from the glare of sunlight. (Wikipedia: Sun visor)

Sunoco Special  New York State Police patrol car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

sunroof  An automotive sunroof is a fixed or operable (venting or sliding) opening in an automobile roof which allows light and/or fresh air to enter the passenger compartment. Sunroofs are either manually operated or motor driven, and are available in many shapes, sizes and styles. (Wikipedia: Sunroof)

Super Bowl  Channel 6 (27.025 MHz). A popular channel for skip shooters using high powered amplifiers. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Super Chickens  Yellow Freight System trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

super slab  A multi-lane highway. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

super special  Timed special stage in a rally on a purpose-built track, often in a stadium. Usually two cars will set off at the same time in separate lanes, and at the halfway point of the stage they will swap lanes, usually due to a crossover involving a bridge. A similar format is used in the Race of Champions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Super Trooper  Either a marked or unmarked state trooper vehicle sporting additional antenna on the trunk or sides of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Super Trucker  It was Jimmy Hoffa during the early sixties who gave a speech in which he coined 'super truckers' to mean the extra ordinary strength it required to be an over the road driver. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

supercar  Supercar is a term generally used for ultra-high-end exotic cars, whose performance is superior to that of its contemporaries. The proper application of the term is subjective and disputed, especially among enthusiasts. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

supermini  This class is known as supermini in the UK, subcompact in North America. Superminis have three, four or five doors, and even as an estate shape. They are designed to seat four passengers comfortably. Current supermini hatchbacks are approximately 3900 mm long, while saloons and estate cars are around 4200 mm long. Currently (2013) sedan variants are generally not available in Europe and are marketed at a lower price than hatchback models in North America. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

superpole  A selection procedure in which the ten or 15 fastest qualifiers compete for grid positions in a single-lap effort without other vehicles on the track. While not specifically referenced, most NASCAR races will use this style of qualifying for all cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

support race  A race(s) that takes place before and/or after the main event race. It may also be held during a qualifying day, and is often used to provide a fuller weekend of activities. It is normally a race from a lower or "ladder" series, is usually shorter in duration, and in some cases might feature some moonlighting drivers from the main event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

support rally  When a rally driver retires on any day, except the last, they can continue the next day incurring penalties for the stages they did not drive, including the one they retired on. Currently, in World Rally Championship, a driver will be given the time of the fastest driver of their class, plus a five-minute-penalty for each missed stage. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

suspension link  In automotive suspensions, a suspension link, control link or link is a suspension member, that attaches at only two points. One point being the body or frame of the vehicle and the other point attaching to the knuckle, upright, axle or another link. The link pivots on either a bushing or a ball joint at each attachment point. A link differs from a control arm because it can only control one of the degrees of freedom by itself. In the attached photo of a 5-link live axle suspension, the different types of links can be seen. These links work in tandem with the coil springs, dampers, and sway bar to control all six degrees of freedom of the axle. The upper links (orange) and the lower links (yellow) work in tandem to control the pitch, yaw and the fore and aft movement (surge). The panhard rod (green) controls the left and right movement (sway). While the springs and dampers (not shown) control the up and down movement (heave) and the roll is controlled by the sway bar (also not shown). It takes a minimum of two links per wheel in a MacPherson strut-style suspension and a minimum of three links per wheel in a multi-link suspension. (Wikipedia: Suspension link)

swage line  Crease or curvature in the side of the body used to create visual distinction. Sometimes the crease is functional and improves rigidity of the outer body (interchangeable with character line). (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Swamp, The  Montréal, Québec (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Swedish Kiss  A negative flick out to a flat surface which frames trim sections or venting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

swindle sheet  A trucker's log book. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

swinger  (from Sidecar racing) A passenger on a racing motorcycle sidecar who athletically moves from one side of the sidecar to the other, altering a sidecar's weight distribution to assist in cornering speed and in some corners to prevent the sidecar from tipping over. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Swiss cheese wagon  A school activity bus. So called because they are usually painted white. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

switchable retractor  A retractor that can be switched from emergency locking retractor to an automatic locking retractor for use when installing car seats. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

tōge  A Japanese word literally meaning "pass." It refers to a mountain pass or any of the narrow, winding roads that can be found in and around the mountains of Japan and other geographically similar areas, like the legendary Nordschleife in Germany. (Tōge)

T-bone  A collision in which the front of a car crashes into the side of another car, forming a "T" shape. This is one of the more dangerous types of crash due to the relative vulnerability of side impacts where there is much less deformable structure on the side of a car to protect the driver. Also, to crash into another car in such a fashion; the victim is "T-boned". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

T-car  Alternative term for spare/backup car (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

t-top  A derivative of the Targa top, called a T-bar roof, this fixed-roof design has two removable panels and retains a central narrow roof section along the front to back axis of the car (e.g. Toyota MR2 Mark I.) (Wikipedia: Car classification)

T-Town  Tulsa, Oklahoma. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

T.K.  Thermo King; refrigerated unit on the front of a trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

T2 Me Too  A Peterbilt 387 tractor. Noted for its near clonelike resemblance to the Kenworth T-2000. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

tachometer  A tachometer (revolution-counter, tach, rev-counter, RPM gauge) is an instrument measuring the rotation speed of a shaft or disk, as in a motor or other machine. The device usually displays the revolutions per minute (RPM) on a calibrated analogue dial, but digital displays are increasingly common. The word comes from Greek ταχος (tachos "speed") and metron ("measure"). Essentially the words tachometer and speedometer have identical meaning: a device that measures speed. It is by arbitrary convention that in the automotive world one is used for engine and the other for vehicle speed. In formal engineering nomenclature, more precise terms are used to distinguish the two. (Wikipedia: Tachometer)

tail lights  Conspicuity for the rear of a vehicle is provided by rear position lamps (also called rear position lamps or tail lamps, taillights, or tail lights). These are required to produce only red light and to be wired such that they are lit whenever the front position lamps are lit, including when the headlamps are on. Rear position lamps may be combined with the vehicle's stop lamps or separate from them. In combined-function installations, the lamps produce brighter red light for the stop lamp function and dimmer red light for the rear position lamp function. Regulations worldwide stipulate minimum intensity ratios between the bright (stop) and dim (rear position) modes, so that a vehicle displaying rear position lamps will not be mistakenly interpreted as showing stop lamps, and vice versa. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

takeyari  Very tall exhaust pipes that exit from under the back bumper of a car, turn upward, and end well over the height of the car. (Japanese)

tandem fodder  Someone or something (e.g. an animal) of trivial importance obstructing the right-of-way on a roadway to the detriment of their own safety (derived from the term, "Cannon fodder"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

tandems  The rear wheels on a trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

tank-slapper  When the front wheel of a motorcycle oscillates rapidly, causing the handlebars to slap against the fuel tank. It is increasingly being used to refer to a vehicle that loses traction at the rear, regains traction and loses it again, causing the rear to weave side to side independently of the front of the car. This is more often referred to as fish-tailing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Tansō (単走 solo run)  (drifting) Japanese term for individual passes where drivers drive whilst being observed in front of judges in an attempt to vy for the top spot. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

tarapopp  A "caruggy" or tarapopp is a specialized off-road vehicle. Caruggy is a portmanteau of the words car and buggy. Some people think that the caruggy nomenclature is derived from using a car frame as the basis for the vehicle, whereas a "buggy" would have started from the chassis of a Volkswagen Bug. Actually the "caruggy" is the "unlimited class", full tube chassis brainchild of Tim Lawrence (TLR Performance Fabrication) of El Cajon, Ca. With the help of Travis Rojas (the co driver). It is a morph between a "Trophy car" and a "Race Buggy". It is simply put, a giant front engined race buggy, like a car. Race buggies were historically rear engine. Caruggy are built for off-road racing. They are built at specialty shops that know and understand the rules of the racing classes. Popular racing series that include these vehicles are the Baja 1000, Baja 500, The Mint 400, the 1400-mile Vegas to Reno, etc. Caruggies are built from scratch, not heavily modified street vehicles that have been altered to the point that they barely resemble their original form. A caruggy generally has several defining features: (Wikipedia: Truggy)

team orders  The practice of one driver allowing another from the same team or manufacturer to gain a higher finish at the direction of the team management. Often employed to prevent the risk of an accident resulting in damage to both of a team's cars. The practice was briefly forbidden in Formula One as a consequence of the 2002 Austrian Grand Prix controversy. U.S.-based series (NASCAR, IndyCar, etc.) rarely if ever have used team orders, and the practice is widely frowned upon due to sportsmanship issues and fan backlash. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

tear-off  Thin plastic sheets that drivers stack up over their visor or windshield for visibility. Drivers (or pit crews) tear one off after it becomes dirty. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

technician  Term used to refer to a person who has successfully completed the standardized Child Passenger Safety Technician certification course. The certification courses use a NHTSA training curriculum, and Safe Kids Worldwide serves as the certifying body. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

telematic control unit  A telematic control unit (TCU) in the automobile industry refers to the embedded system on board a vehicle that controls tracking of the vehicle. A TCU consists of: a global positioning system (GPS) unit, which keeps track of the latitude and longitude values of the vehicle; an external interface for mobile communication (GSM, GPRS, Wi-Fi, WiMax, or LTE), which provides the tracked values to a centralized geographical information system (GIS) database server; an electronic processing unit; a microcontroller, in some versions; a microprocessor or field programmable gate array (FPGA), which processes the information and acts on the interface between the GPS; a mobile communication unit; and some amount of memory for saving GPS values in case of mobile-free zones or to intelligently store information about the vehicle's sensor data. (Wikipedia: Telematic control unit)

template  A device used by sanctioning body officials to check the body shape and height of racing vehicles. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

ten-tenths  Refers to driving a car to its absolute potential. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Terrible Flow  Notoriously unreliable GM V6 Toro Flow diesel engine used in some GM trucks built in the 1960s and 70s. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

tether anchor  Hardware used to connect the tether at a designated anchor point in the vehicle. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

tether  Comprised of a tether strap and tether hook that 'anchors' the top of the car seat to the tether anchor in the vehicle. Keeps restraint from tipping forward on impact and can provide extra protection. The tether is located on the top rear of convertible, combination, and all-in-one car seats used forward-facing. Most rear-facing-only infant car seats do not use this equipment for installation. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

Texas Cadillac  A Chevrolet Suburban. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Big Easy  New Orleans, Louisiana (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Big Road  An interstate, particularly Interstate-80. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Big Stink  Las Cruces, New Mexico (Due to its waste water treatment plant being to close to I-10). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Bluff  Poplar Bluff, Missouri. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Canadian Turnpike  Name give to Interstate-81 because of its heavy Canadian truck traffic. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Curve  I-90 & I-39 interchange; I-90 turn north at Rockford, IL. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Dime  Interstate Highway 10. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Dog  Greyhound bus. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Magic City  Birmingham, Alabama. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Peg  Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

The Swamp  Montréal, Québec (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Thermos Bottle  Driver pulling a chemical trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

thirteen-letter shit spreader  A Navistar International truck (formerly International Harvester). The terms originated because the International Harvester Company was primarily known for their farm machinery. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

three on the tree  A three-speed manual gearshift where the shift lever is located on the steering column (the "tree"). Similar in phrasing to "four on the floor."

three-box form  A categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the Three-box form, there is a "box" delineating a separate volume from the a-pillar forward, a second box comprising the passenger volume, and third box comprising the trunk area — e.g., a Sedan. The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "3-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

throttle body spacer  A throttle body spacer is usually a 1-inch (25 mm) thick piece of metal that is bolted to the outlet of the throttle body upstream of air flow into the manifold. By changing the airflow, this after-market add-on does claim to be a performance enhancing accessory that can increase an engine's horse power, torque and fuel economy. It functions by swirling or directing the air flow to maximize air volume to the manifold. There is much debate about the veracity of the manufacturers claims for these devices. The general consensus is that it works well on some engine configurations, and not at all, or adversely on others. (Wikipedia: Throttle body spacer)

throttleman  In offshore powerboat racing, the boat's second occupant who work alongside the driver, whose role is to steer the boat. The throttleman's position is to adjust the trim tab whilst observing water conditions and extract as much speed out of the boat by controlling the hand-throttle during a race whilst it hops over tides after tides to prevent the propellers from spinning wildly whilst the boat is airborne, which causes the engine to overrev, leading to engine damage. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

throw a belt  (drag racing) Losing the drive belt connecting the engine's crankshaft to the supercharger. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Thunderchicken  A derogatory nickname for a Ford Thunderbird. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Thunderturd  A derogatory nickname for a Ford Thunderbird.

Tijuana Taxi  A marked police car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

time attack  A competition which involve cars running around the circuit in lieu of a qualifying lap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

timed race  Instead of running a predetermined number of laps, a race runs for a predetermined amount of time (i.e. 24 Hours of Le Mans). This is common in endurance racing, although series such as Formula 1 have a limit on how long a race can be run (Usually two hours), which means that a race may be ended after the time limit expires but before the predetermined number of laps is run. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

timeslip  (drag racing) E.T. slip. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

tin Lizzie  A nickname for a Ford Model T.

tire load sensitivity  Tire load sensitivity describes the behaviour of tires under load. Conventional pneumatic tires do not behave as classical friction theory would suggest. The load sensitivity of most real tires in their typical operating range is such that the coefficient of friction decreases as the vertical load, Fz, increases. The maximum lateral force that can be developed does increase as the vertical load increases, but at a diminishing rate. (Wikipedia: Tire load sensitivity)

tire shake  A term in drag racing, when the engine is putting out more horsepower than the drive axle can handle, causing the rear tires to shake violently. This results in a loss of speed, and can also result in loss of steering, and occasionally, lead to on track accidents. Refer to in other disciplines sometimes as axle tramp. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

title washing  The fraudulent process through which a vehicle’s title is corruptly altered to conceal information that should normally be contained on the title, such as a previous salvaged title or a financial lienholder. (FBI)

Tommy  A request for a location of an information station, such as rest area information center or truck stop information desk. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ton top  Road car-derived vehicles with a roof, mainly in touring car racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Tonto  Toronto, Ontario, Canada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

top end  (drag racing) Finish line of strip; high part of engine's rev band. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

topper  A camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)

town car  Essentially the inverse of the landaulet, a historical body style in which the front seats were open and the rear compartment closed, normally with a removable top to cover the front chauffeur's compartment. In Europe the style is also known as Sedanca de Ville, often shortened to Sedanca or de Ville. Note that the modern Lincoln Town Car derives its name, but nothing else, from this style. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Town Clown  A law officer with a city or township police force, seldom encountered on interstate highways. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

town clown  The unlucky guy who gets one short, local ride after another. This is really frustrating, especially when other drivers are getting great rides all around you. I have a general rule: four locals in a row and I'm done for the day. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

Toy Box  Toyota vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

track record  A term referring either to the best performance of any athlete on a certain track, or to the history of a certain racer's past performance. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

track  The distance across the car between the base of the left and right wheels. (Like wheelbase, but side to side.) (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

trackless tram  A bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.

trackless trolley  A bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.

traction bars  (drag racing) Rear struts fixed to rear axle to keep rear axle from twisting, which causes wheel hop and loss of traction; also called slapper bars. In FWD cars, commonly import drag racing, used to keep front wheels in the ground. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

traction control  This regulates the power supplied to the wheels of a vehicle to prevent wheelspin. It is banned in many forms of motor racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

trailer jockey  See "Yard Goat". Short single-axle truck used for pulling semi-trailers in shipping yards. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

trailer light converter  A Trailer light converter is an electrical component used for connecting the wiring of a trailer onto a towing vehicle. It is sometimes necessary because of the legal requirement for trailer lighting. Furthermore, from a technical perspective, it is used for wiring the two vehicles together to power and synchronize their lighting systems. A trailer light converter assists in adapting the differences in voltage and the number of wires. Most basic trailers in Canada and USA usually have only one light (with one wire) on each side that functions as both a turn signal and a brake light (though sometimes there is a separate yellow and red light for signal and brake lighting). The brake signal from the towing vehicle usually needs to be received by the converter and then sent to both the left and right trailer lights. (Wikipedia: Trailer light converter)

train  Police backup. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

transmission solenoid  A transmission solenoid is an electro-hydraulic valve that controls fluid flow into and throughout an automatic transmission. Solenoids can be normally open or normally closed. They operate via a voltage or current supplied by the transmission computer or controller. Transmission solenoids are usually installed in a transmission valve body, transmission control unit or transmission control module. (Wikipedia: Transmission solenoid)

trap speed  (drag racing) Speed as measured by the speed trap near the finish line, indicative of the maximum speed reached on a pass. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

traps  (drag racing) The 20 meter (66 ft) timing lights at top end of race track to measure speed & E.T. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Trash Can  Transcontinental truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

tree  the plastic molding frame on which plastic model parts are distributed.

Tri Power  Tri power was the name for an arrangement of three two-barrel carburetors installed on large performance V8s offered by the Pontiac Division of General Motors in the late 1950s and 1960s. Three individual Rochester 2G carburetors were arranged inline on the intake manifold, the center one operating normally and the outer two acting as secondaries, or "dumpers", for full throttle performance. Tri Power often included a hood bulge to accommodate the carburetor set-up and identifying badging on the vehicle's exterior. (Wikipedia: Tri power)

tricycle motor  Young child (Also, "Crumb-Cruncher", "Curtain Climber", "Rugrat"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

trike  A motorcycle with three wheels, usually one front and two rear wheels.

trim package  A trim package (sometimes called an appearance package) is an automotive package composed by a set of cosmetic (mostly non-functional) embellishments to a vehicle. In some cases the trim package may include a specific model or ending name. Such packages may be characterized by the use of a famous fashion designer's name, including examples as the Pierre Cardin AMC Javelin, the Oleg Cassini AMC Matador, or the Lincoln Continental in Givenchy or Bill Blass versions. (Wikipedia: Trim package)

Triple Nickel  Cummins 555 V8 diesel truck engine. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

triptych  Commonly the word means a three-panel artwork, often hinged in some way into three pieces.  Also refers to an automobile route book consisting of strips of paper maps (2"x9" a common size) bound together.  The AAA trademark term is "TripTik."

trolley bus  A bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.

trolley coach  A bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.

Truck Stop Tommy  A pimp of sorts who specializes in getting truckers illegal services and/or drugs. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

truck  A typically large vehicle built using frame-on-rail construction consisting of a cab and a separate bed for cargo. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

truckie  Slang for a truck driver.

truckstop hookup  A short term date of sorts. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

truggy  A "caruggy" or tarapopp is a specialized off-road vehicle. Caruggy is a portmanteau of the words car and buggy. Some people think that the caruggy nomenclature is derived from using a car frame as the basis for the vehicle, whereas a "buggy" would have started from the chassis of a Volkswagen Bug. Actually the "caruggy" is the "unlimited class", full tube chassis brainchild of Tim Lawrence (TLR Performance Fabrication) of El Cajon, Ca. With the help of Travis Rojas (the co driver). It is a morph between a "Trophy car" and a "Race Buggy". It is simply put, a giant front engined race buggy, like a car. Race buggies were historically rear engine. Caruggy are built for off-road racing. They are built at specialty shops that know and understand the rules of the racing classes. Popular racing series that include these vehicles are the Baja 1000, Baja 500, The Mint 400, the 1400-mile Vegas to Reno, etc. Caruggies are built from scratch, not heavily modified street vehicles that have been altered to the point that they barely resemble their original form. A caruggy generally has several defining features: (Wikipedia: Truggy)

trunk  Compartment for storage of cargo which is separate from the cab. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

Tsuisō (追走 chase-attack)  (drifting) Japanese term for tandem passes where two cars are paired off against each other over two passes within a heat, with each driver taking a turn to lead. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

tube fender  Replacement fenders found on off road vehicles designed as part of body armor for off road vehicles. Used to protect the thin sheet metal bodies from damage while off-roading. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

tumblehome  Generally refers to the way the sides of a car rounds inward toward the roof, specifically of the greenhouse above the beltline. This term is borrowed from nautical description of naval vessels. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

turismo  Spanish term for a sedan. Literally means tourism, used mostly in Latin American countries and Spain. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

turn signals  Turn signals—formally called "direction indicators" or "directional signals", and informally known as "directionals", "blinkers", "indicators" or "flashers"—are blinking lamps mounted near the left and right front and rear corners of a vehicle, and sometimes on the sides or on the side mirrors of a vehicle, activated by the driver on one side of the vehicle at a time to advertise intent to turn or change lanes towards that side. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)

turn under  The shape of the rocker panel as it curves inward at the lower edge. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Twenty  A short form of 10-20. Denotes location, as in identifying one's location ("My 20 is on Main Street and First"), asking the receiver what their current location is ("What's your 20?"), or inquiring about the location of a third person ("Ok, people, I need a 20 on Little Timmy and fast"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

twister tracker  Someone who is chasing tornadoes, other storms. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Two Story Falcon  Ford H series cab-over-engine trucks built during the 1960s. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

two-box form  A categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the Two-box form, there is usually a "box" representing a separate volume from the a-pillar forward and second box making up the rest. e.g., Station Wagon, Shooting-brake, Scion xB (2006) The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "2-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

two-speed  Hi-Low rear axle used in some trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

U-Haul lesbian  U-Haul lesbian or U-Haul syndrome is a stereotype of lesbian relationships, referring to the joke that lesbians tend to move in together on the second date. It suggests an extreme inclination toward monogamy or committed relationships. It can be considered both complimentary and pejorative, depending on context. (Wikipedia)

UFO Central  Area 51, other areas known for UFO activity. (Truckers call the area near Rachel, Nevada this, as well as other areas known for UFO activity, such as Roswell, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Arizona). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

ultracompact car  In 2012, Japan's Transport and Tourism Ministry allowed local government to use ultracompact cars as transport for residents and tourists in their limiting areas. The size of ultracompact cars will be less than minicars, but have engine greater than 50cc displacement and able to transport 1 or 2 persons. Ultracompact cars cannot use minicars standard, because of strict safety standards for minicars. The regulation about running capacity and safety performance of ultracompact cars will be published in early autumn. Today, there are cars smaller than ultracompact cars, called category-1 motorized vehicles which it has 50cc displacement or less and only one seat for the driver. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

underglow  Light glow from under the chassis of a vehicle. Formerly referred to as neon for the type of lighting used, underglow came about as LED lights became more common than neon lights.

understeer  Cornering behaviour where the front wheels do not follow the steered course but instead push out toward the outside of the turn. Known as push in NASCAR and other stock car racing. Opposite of oversteer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

undertray  Flat or stepped flat surface on the bottom of open wheel and sports prototype racing cars. Theory has varied along with aerodynamic developments and regulations, from the sidepod tunnels of ground effect to the flat undertrays of the 1980s in various attempts to use aerodynamics to suck the cars closer to the bitumen, minimising the air underneath the car that could slow its progress. Today most such categories feature a stepped undertray with sidepods siting higher in the air than the centre of the car, usually mandated by series organisers in an attempt to limit vehicle performance. Also refers to flat surfaces extending behind splitters in sedan and GT based racing cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

United Package Smashers  United Parcel Service truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

United Pot Smokers  United Parcel Service truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

unleaded  Gasoline without tetraethyl lead additive. Technically the default formula as lead had to be added to gasoline that did not naturally contain lead, the lead was added to gasoline for a half century and was so familiar that it made "unleaded gasoline" a new product in the late 1960's/early 1970's.

ute  A term used originally in Australia and New Zealand to describe usually two-wheel-drive, traditionally passenger vehicles with a cargo tray in the rear integrated with the passenger body; as opposed to a pickup whose cargo tray is not integrated with the passenger body. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

vacuum delay valve  A vacuum delay valve is a valve with a small orifice, which delays a vacuum signal. These are commonly used in automobiles to alter the behavior of vacuum switches, vacuum motors, and other vacuum devices. The engine in a common automobile produces almost 20 inches of mercury (68 kPa) of vacuum, and this pressure differential has been utilized for everything from automatic locks and windshield wipers to operating emissions control items. (Wikipedia: Vacuum delay valve)

vacuum switch  Prior to effective engine control unit computers, engine vacuum was used for many functions in an automobile. Vacuum switches were employed to regulate this flow. For instance a dual port vacuum switch located in a port on the intake manifold monitored the coolant temperature in the coolant crossover. It received vacuum (port E on the switch) from the carburetor. The vacuum flowed through the switch to a vacuum solenoid (such as a heat riser, used to restrict exhaust allowing the engine to heat up faster). When the coolant heated to operating temperature the vacuum switch closed off the port (port S on the vacuum switch) turning off the vacuum to the heat riser. The result is to clear the exhaust restriction. The switch monitored the temperature and when conditions were right it performed its designed function. (Wikipedia: Vacuum switch)

vagoneta  Bolivian Spanish Colloquial term for a station wagon (with or without SUV capabilities). (Wikipedia: Car classification)

valve bounce  Valve bounce is a condition where the valve does not stay seated, due to the combined effects of the valve's inertia and resonance of metallic valve springs that reduce the closing force, and allow the valve to re-open partially. (Wikipedia: valve float)

valve float  Valve float is an adverse condition which can occur at high engine speeds when the poppet valves in an internal combustion engine valvetrain do not properly follow the closure phase of the cam lobe profile. This reduces engine efficiency and performance and potentially increases engine emissions. There is also a significant risk of severe engine damage due to valve spring damage and/or pistons contacting the valves. (Wikipedia: valve float)

valve loft  Valve loft is intentionally using a controlled valve float to increase lift and duration of the valve open cycle. In some motorsports there are rules that limit camshaft lift; therefore, provoking this type of exploitation. Properly optimizing the system avoids undue stresses to the camshaft lobes and tappets. (Wikipedia: valve float)

valve shim  A valve shim is a disc of hardened metal of precisely calibrated height, used to adjust the clearance (US: lash) between the back side of the cam-lobe and the valve on which it operates, where the cam-lobe operates directly on the valve without an intermediate rocker arm. The shim sits atop a shim bucket which itself sits atop the valve-stem, and moves up and down within a machined bore. While hydraulically self-adjusting valves are sometimes preferred, because they require no adjustment, they do not work well in engines capable of high RPMs. In those, shims are most often used. As an example, most motorcycle engines capable of 8000RPM+ use shim-adjustable valves. (Wikipedia: Valve shim)

valvetrain  The mechanisms and parts which control the operation of the valves. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

van  In some countries, the term "van" can refer to a small panel van based on a passenger car design (often the estate model / station wagon); it also refers to light trucks, which themselves are sometimes based on SUVs or MPVs. (But note that those retaining seats and windows, while being larger and more utilitarian than MPVs, may be called "minibuses".) The term is also used in the term "camper van" (or just "camper") — equivalent to a North American recreational vehicle (RV). In the United States, the term "van" refers to vehicles that, like European minibuses, are even larger than large MPVs and are rarely seen being driven for domestic purposes — except for "conversion vans". These possess extremely large interior space and are often more intended for hauling cargo than people. Most vans use body-on-frame construction and are thus suitable for extensive modification and coachwork, known as conversion. Conversion vans are often quite luxurious, boasting comfortable seats, soft rides, built-in support for electronics such as television sets, and other amenities. The more elaborate conversion vans straddle the line between cars and recreational vehicles. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

Vantucky  Vancouver, Washington. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)  A set of about 17 codes, combining letters and numbers, assigned to a vehicle at the factory and inscribed on a small metal label attached to the dashboard and visible through the windshield. The vehicle identification number (VIN) is a unique identifier for the vehicle and therefore is often found on insurance cards, vehicle registrations, vehicle titles, safety or emission certificates, insurance policies, and bills of sale. The coded information in the VIN describes characteristics of the vehicle such as engine size and weight. Source: USDOT 2012

Ventiports  The official Buick name for the fender holes more commonly known as "portholes." Buick started the trend in the 1950's, and it has been known by the common generic name as it has spread to other marques via fake stick-on portholes sold at auto parts stores.

Victory Lane  Also 'Winner's Circle,' because of early motorsport's roots at horse racing tracks, the American term for the place where the winner of a race goes to celebrate victory after winning an event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

victory lap  A lap, after the conclusion of the race, where the winning racer drives at reduced speed to celebrate his or her victory. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

VIP style  VIP style is more or less a crossover between Shakotan and gang cars: extremely lowered luxury vehicles (lots of bling!) are filled up with as much novelties as possible and ride on big rims. Sometimes very close to Bosozoku style. (What is bosozoku?)

wagon delivery  North American term (mainly U.S. and Canada). Similar to a sedan delivery, with four doors. (Wikipedia: Car classification)

wallies  A slower car, usually found at the rear of the grid. It is sometimes a derogatory term. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Wally  In the NHRA, The Wally is the nickname of the trophy that is earned by the winner of an event, the nickname refers to the founder of the NHRA, Wally Parks. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

warm air intake  A warm air intake or WAI is a system to decrease the amount of the air going into a car for the purpose of increasing the fuel economy of the internal-combustion engine. This term may also be used to describe a short ram air intake, a totally different intake modification. All warm air intakes operate on the principle of decreasing the amount of oxygen available for combustion with fuel. Warm air from inside the engine bay is used opposed to air taken from the generally more restrictive stock intake. Warmer air is less dense, and thus contains less oxygen to burn fuel in. The car's ECU compensates by opening the throttle wider to admit more air. This, in turn, decreases the resistance the engine must overcome to suck air in. The net effect is for the engine to intake the same amount of oxygen (and thus burn the same amount of fuel, producing the same power) but with less pumping losses, allowing for a gain in fuel economy, at the expense of top-end power. Opposite principle of a cold air intake (CAI) which significantly differs by collecting air from a colder source outside the engine. In the extreme, a warm air intake can eliminate the need for a conventional throttle and thus eliminate throttle losses. (Wikipedia: Warm air intake)

wastegate  Device attached to turbochargers used to limit the additional horsepower they produce. Usually a mechanical device, activated when the pressure within the turbocharger reaches a certain point, opening a valve, thus reducing boost pressure. Used primarily for safety (speed reduction of the racing cars) or cost (reducing stress on both turbo and engine, lengthening the life of the parts prior to failure or rebuild). Not to be confused with a Blow-Off Valve. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

watering the tires  To urinate using the quadruple tractor or trailer tires. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

wear the shiny off  A term used, mostly within drag racing, when a brand new car either hits the wall, or, in the Pro Stock class, when a new car flips over into its top and continues down the track for a considerable length, peeling the paint, or more common in recent years, vinyl wrap, off. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

webbing  The fabric part of the seat belt that crosses the body and holds a person or a car seat in place. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)

wedge  Shape of the car as seen in the side profile. May be positive, negative or neutral. If the front is lower than the rear, then it is wedge-positive. If the rear is lower it is wedge-negative. If the car appears level from front to rear, then it is wedge neutral. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

weight shifting  A technique used to reduce understeer. This involves the driver decelerating through a corner to shift the weight of the car from the back to the front, increasing grip of the front tyres and decreasing understeer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Weiner Wagon  A Werner Transport tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

wet tyre  A racing tyre with deep grooves designed to displace standing water, allowing the tyre to obtain grip in conditions where dry weather tyres (slicks) would aquaplane. Monsoon wet has become a term used for extremely wet conditions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheel arch gap  The space between the tire and the wheel well. Currently there is a trend towards smaller wheel arch gaps. Sometimes referred to as Dead Cat Space due to the fact that, in winter, many domestic cats try to seek shelter in wheel wells of recently parked cars in an attempt to stay warm. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

wheel arch  The visible opening in the side of a car allowing access to the wheel. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

wheel banging  When the wheels of two different race cars slightly collide during an overtaking manoeuvre. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheel cylinder  A wheel cylinder is a component in a drum brake system. It is located in each wheel and is usually positioned at the top of the wheel, above the shoes. Its function is to exert force onto the shoes so as to bring them into contact with the drum and stop the vehicle with friction. The wheel cylinders are usually connected to the shoes with small bird-beak shaped rods. It is very similar to a slave cylinder and functions in much the same way, internally consisting of only a simple plunger. On older vehicles these may begin to leak and hinder the performance of the brakes, but are normally inexpensive and relatively easy to replace. The wheel cylinder consists of a cylinder that has two pistons, one on each side. Each piston has a rubber seal and a shaft that connects the piston with a brake shoe. When brake pressure is applied, the pistons are forced out pushing the shoes into contact with the drum. Some designs use two single piston wheel cylinders, one at the top of the drum and one at the bottom, each connected to one brake shoe. Wheel cylinders must be rebuilt or replaced if they show signs of leaking. Wheel cylinders used to be made of cast iron. However, they were more prone to rusting and aluminium is now the preferred material. (Wikipedia: Wheel cylinder)

wheel hop  (drag racing) Violent shaking of the car as the tires lose and regain traction in quick succession. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheel shroud  Also known as aero cover or rim blanking. A wheel cover designed to distribute airflow to the brakes, thereby generate downforce. Saw common use in the Group C era, Indycar up to 1993 when banned and in F1 between 2006-2009. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheel well  (also bucket) The enclosure or space for the wheel. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

wheelbase  The distance front to back measured from where the front and rear wheels meet the ground. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

wheelie bars  (drag racing) Rear struts fixed to rear axle, which protrude out to rear of car to help prevent car's front from raising too high or flipping over on launch. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheelie  In a rear wheel drive vehicle, when the front wheel(s) rise up in the air under acceleration. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheelspin  When the rear tyres (or front tyres in the case of a front wheel drive vehicle) break traction with the racing surface under acceleration, spinning the wheels faster than they move across the surface. On higher traction surfaces like bitumen the tyre will begin to shred and melt from the friction, producing white smoke. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheelstand  A type of wheelie. In drag racing, an extreme case, with front wheels very near vertical. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wheelstander  In drag racing, an exhibition car designed to complete a pass in a wheelstand (wheels near vertical). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

whip  A motocross technique in which the rider pitch their bike sideways and reposition themselves for the landing whilst airborne. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

white metal  A way to collectively refer to trucks, vans, step vans, and other work vehicles that are usually painted white.

wickerbill  Another name for a Gurney flap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

widowmaker  A semi truck pulling two or more trailers in tandem. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

wiggle wagon  A semi truck pulling two or more trailers in tandem. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

wildcatting  Picking up a flag in a city or zone you're not licensed for. San Diego and certain suburbs have banded together to offer a single pickup license, but the airport has its own license, as do some suburbs. A cabbie can only pick up where he's licensed; he can drop off anywhere except Mexico (for insurance reasons). (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)

Willy Weaver  A driver who is weaving, due to lack of sleep or excess of alcohol. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

window deflector  A window deflector is mounted above the doors of some automobiles, to protect the inside of the car from rain or other precipitation in case of slightly opened windows. Additionally, it may help to prevent precipitation entering the interior in case of an opened door, e.g. dropping from the roof or directly from the air. Deflectors are also fitted to sunroofs to deviate wind. It is also known as a "monsoonshield" or a "rain visor" (in countries without monsoon). The primary purpose of window deflectors is to prevent dust, snow, rain, other precipitation or excessive wind from entering to the cabin. Also, window deflectors direct air flows over the vehicle, and thus, reduce the wind noise when driving on moderate speeds. Window deflectors can be installed directly in the window channel or attached to the vehicle's body in the sunroof or side window area using 3M automotive-grade adhesive tape. Window deflectors are common accessory in the automotive aftermarket. Being vehicle-specific, they are normally designed to fit individual car, truck or SUV models. (Wikipedia: Window deflector)

window washer  Rain. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

windshield trim  US DOT Term: Molding of any material between the windshield glazing and the exterior roof surface, including material that covers a part of either the windshield glazing or exterior roof surface. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

wing  Aerodynamic device on many racing cars. The principle is the same as an aircraft wing except in motor racing applications the wing is inverted to create downforce instead of lift, pressing the car onto the road surface to increase traction. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wired to the tree  A drag racing term for a racer that consistently beats his opponent off the starting line. Also called Chopping down the Christmas Tree. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

wishbone  Suspension control arm with three points, shaped roughly like a chicken wishbone. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

with a customer  Officer with a car pulled over. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

workin'  A Weigh Station or Rest Area that is pulling trucks in for weighing or inspection. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

works team  A motor racing team supported by a vehicle manufacturer, usually run in-house at the manufacturer's premises. A works driver is a driver who drives for the works team. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Yanky style  During the 70s and 80s in Osaka area the street fashion became to wear colourful Aloha shirts and pants and this caused the wearers being called Yankees. Most of the “bad boys” were wearing the Aloha fashion and hence the Bosozoku became equivalent to Yankee style. The writing of this style is officially with double ii, so Yankii. (What is bosozoku?)

yard dog/yard goat/yard jockey  Short single-axle truck used for pulling semi-trailers in shipping yards. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

yard line  Mile marker. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

yardstick  Mile marker post. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

yellow chequer  A term derived when the final lap(s) in a race is completed during a full course yellow while the field is under the control of the Safety Car. In this instance the yellow and chequered flags are waved together and the race is declared finished with the order the same as when the full course yellow began. Unpopular with spectators because of the anti-climactic nature of the finish, the possibility does make some senior race officials hesitate to use it late in the race, call a red flag to allow for further cleanup of the circuit to ensure a final restart (which is often used anyway for severe debris incidents, especially with carbon fibre), or direct to slow the safety car in order that the hazard may be cleared in time for a competitive race finish. INDYCAR has a Yellow chequer rule, and NASCAR allows it (1) if a race is shortened because of curfew or darkness, (2) if the race is already on its final lap when the yellow must be waved, or (3) if there is a yellow implemented after the leader crosses the "overtime line" (usually located on the backstretch) during a valid green-white-checkered finish once the race has restarted. In Formula One, when there is a yellow chequer, the safety car will not lead the leader to the finish line, unlike INDYCAR and NASCAR. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

You Ass Eh  The U.S.A. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)

zero car  Used in rallying. Prior to the rally cars running over a special stage several official vehicles run through the course to check for safety, conditions of the road, to see if spectators or animals may be a hazard or for obstructions. Sometimes there are a triple zero (000) and double zero (00) as well as the zero. Zero cars travel the course immediately ahead of the competitors and are usually rally cars themselves. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

zero light  Also known as "cutting a zero," and a "zero R.T." Used in drag racing when someone leaves the starting line at the exact moment when the light turns green (.000). Very difficult to achieve, due to the quick flashing of the lights on a Pro tree. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

Zipper  Painted dashed line dividing lanes ("He is hogging the zipper"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)


Images

Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 2 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #2, January 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 2 - 828KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 2 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #2, January 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 2 - 1.0MB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 2 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #2, January 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 2 - 909KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 3 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #3, March 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 3 - 1.0MB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 3 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #3, March 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 3 - 1.1MB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 3 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #3, March 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 3 - 888KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 4 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #4, May 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 4 - 1.0MB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 4 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #4, May 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 4 - 1.0MB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 4 Hot Rods and Racing Cars #4, May 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 4 - 982KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 6 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #6, September 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 6 - 941KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 6 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #6, September 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 6 - 1.0MB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 6 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #6, September 1952
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 6 - 982KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 8 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #8, February 1953
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 8 - 496KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 8 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #8, February 1953
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 8 - 506KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 10 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #10, June 1953
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 10 - 803KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 10 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #10, June 1953
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 10 - 876KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 11 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #11, August 1953
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 11 - 620KB
Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 11 Hot Rod Talk
Hot Rods and Racing Cars #11, August 1953
View Hot Rods and Racing Cars: Issue 11 - 640KB
Speed Demons: Issue 9 Hot Rod Talk
Speed Demons #9, January 1958
View Speed Demons: Issue 9 - 860KB


Sound Diagnostics

Words to decribe sounds that a technician might hear or use.  Words are defined by equivalent sounds.
boom  distant thunder, bass drum.
buzz  bumblebee.
chirp  shopping cart wheel squeak.
clang  banging pots.
click  computer mouse.
clunk  dropping a bowling ball on a garage floor.
creak  rusty door hinge.
grind  sharpening a knife on a stone.
growl  marbles in a metal pan.
hiss  Air escaping from a tire.
knock  knock on a (usually metal) door.
pop  like the sound an an empty metal gas can makes when the sides are flexed.
rattle  shaking a can of spray paint.
roar  waterfall.
rumble  rolling a bowling ball down the alley.
scratch  sandpaper on wood.
sizzle  water dropped on a hot pan.
squeak  gym shoes on a wood floor.
squeal  fingernails on a chalkboard.
tap  pencil (lead end) on a tabletop.
tick  clock's second hand.
twang  A large spring being spring.
whine  electric drill motor.
whistle  teakettle boiling.


Colors

Official paint color names used by manufacturers.  Marked with Interior or Exterior for usage and the vehicles it has been found on.  Note that just because two manufacturers use the same color name does not mean that the two manufacturers' colors are the same!  Color samples are from paint samples or brochure prints and scanned with a basic non-calibrated desktop scanner, and therefore should be considered estimates only for the purpose of research and not used for mixing accurate paint colors.


Anaconda Gold  1972 Pontiac Grand Prix
Arctic White  1988-1989 Buick Reatta and the 2007 Chevrolet Corvette (excluding Z06 models)
Atomic Orange Metallic Tintcoat  2007 Chevrolet Corvette
Barbados Blue Metallic  2004 Pontiac GTO
Berlina Black  2001 Acura NSX
Billet Metallic  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Black  1988-1989 Buick Reatta, 2007 Chevrolet Corvette, 2006 Ford Explorer, 2006 Ford Mustang, 2005 Lincoln Aviator, 2006 Mercury Mariner Hybrid, 2005 Saab 93 Convertible.
Black  Convertible Top, 2006 Ford Mustang
Black Raven  2006 Cadillac CTS
Blackberry  2006 Cadillac CTS
Blue Chip  2006 Cadillac CTS
Bolero Red  1955 Pontiac
Bright White  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Bronze Alloy Metallic  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
BS Blue  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Camel  Interior, 2001 Acura NSX
Cardinal Red  1979 Chevrolet Suburban, 2017 GMC Canyon Source: GMC Canyon brochure scan
Cashmere Tri-Coat Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer
Caution Yellow  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Cayenne Red Pearl  2001 Acura Integra
Chandler Blue  1919 Chandler
Charcoal  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Charcoal Beige  2006 Mercury Mariner Hybrid
Charcoal Beige Metallic  2005 Lincoln Aviator
Charcoal Black  Interior, 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
Chili Red metallic  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Claret Red Metallic  1988-1989 Buick Reatta
Clover Green Pearl  2001 Acura Integra
Colonial Yellow  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Cordova Brown  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Cosmos Purple Metallic  2004 Pontiac GTO
Crystal Red Metallic Tintcoat  2012 Chevrolet Sonic
Cyber Gray Metallic  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
Danger Zone  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Dark Blue Pearl Metallic  2005 Lincoln Aviator and 2006 Ford Explorer
Dark Carmine Red  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Dark Cherry Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer
Dark Emerald Pearl  2001 Acura CL and 2001 Acura TL
Dark Pewter  Interior, 2012 Chevrolet Sonic
Dark Slate Metallic  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
Dark Titanium  Interior, 2012 Chevrolet Sonic
Dark Violet Pearl  2001 Acura Integra
Deep Blue  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Ebony  Interior, 2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura Integra, 2001 Acura RL, 2001 Acura TL and the 2006 Cadillac CTS
Fast Track Grey  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Fern  2001 Acura TL
Firepepper Red Pearl  2001 Acura TL
Flamenco Black Pearl  2001 Acura Integra
Frost White  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Geared Up Grey  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Grand Prix White  2001 Acura NSX
Granite Crystal Metallic  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Graphite  Interior, 2001 Acura Integra
Hawaiian Blue  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Holly Green  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Impulse Blue Metallic  2004 Pontiac GTO
Infrared  2006 Cadillac CTS
Ingot Silver Metallic  2013 Ford Taurus
Ivory Parchment Tri-Coat  2005 Lincoln Aviator
Ivory Tri Coat Pearl  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Jazz Blue Pearl  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Laguna Green Metallic  2001 Acura TL
Laser Red  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Le Mans Blue Metallic  2007 Chevrolet Corvette
Legend Lime Metallic  2006 Ford Mustang
Light Camel  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Light French Silk Metallic  2005 Lincoln Aviator
Light Gray  Interior, 2006 Cadillac CTS
Light Platinum  2006 Cadillac CTS
Lightning McQueen  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Lime Yellow metallic  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Machine Silver Metallic  2007 Chevrolet Corvette
Making Tracks  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Mariner Blue  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Midnight Black  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Milano Red  2001 Acura Integra
Mineral Grey Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer, 2013 Ford Edge
Mineral Metallic  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
Mineral Stone Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer
Monaco Blue Pearl  2001 Acura NSX
Monsoon Gray metallic  2013 Audi A4 allroad
Monterey Blue Pearl  2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura RL and 2001 Acura TL
Monterey Red Metallic Tintcoat  2007 Chevrolet Corvette excluding Z06 models
Mystic Silver  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Naples Gold Metallic  2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura RL and 2001 Acura TL
New Formula Red  2001 Acura NSX
Nighthawk Black Pearl  2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura RL and 2001 Acura TL
Nightvision  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Nocturne Blue metallic  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Onyx  Interior, 2001 Acura NSX
Onyx Black  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
Oxford White  
2006 Ford Explorer and 2005 Lincoln Aviator
Parchment  Interior, 2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura Integra, 2001 Acura RL, and 2001 Acura TL
Parchment  Convertible Top, 2006 Ford Mustang
Parchment Silver metallic  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Performance White  2006 Ford Mustang
Pewter Gray Metallic  1988-1989 Buick Reatta
Phantom Black Metallic  2004 Pontiac GTO
Phantom Black Tri Coat Pearl  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Pine Green  1973 Suzuki RV-125K
Piston Cup Blue  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Pitch Black  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Premium White Pearl  2001 Acura RL
Pueblo Gold Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer
Quartz  Interior, 2001 Acura RL
Quicksilver Metallic  2004 Pontiac GTO, 2017 GMC Canyon Source: GMC Canyon brochure scan
Radiant Bronze  2006 Cadillac CTS
Rally Blue  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Red Quartz Tintcoat  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
Rave Red  2010 Mitsubishi Galant
Raven Black  1955 Pontiac
Redfire Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer and 2006 Ford Mustang
Redline Tri Coat Pearl  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Ruby Red Metallic Tinted  2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid
Ruby Red Pearl  2001 Acura RL
San Marino Red  2001 Acura CL
Sand Storm  2006 Cadillac CTS
Santa Fe Tan  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Sapphire Blue Firemist  1988-1989 Buick Reatta
Satellite Silver  2006 Mercury Mariner Hybrid
Satin Silver Metallic  2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura TL and the 2006 Ford Mustang
Screaming Yellow  2006 Ford Mustang
Sebring Silver Metallic  1997 Chevrolet Camaro SS and the 2001 Acura RL
Shamrock Green  1979 Chevrolet Suburban
Silver  2006 Mercury Mariner Hybrid
Silver Birch Metallic  2006 Ford Explorer and 2005 Lincoln Aviator
Silver metallic  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Silver Smoke  2006 Cadillac CTS
Silverstone Metallic  2001 Acura NSX
Somoa Orange Metallic  2013 Audi TT
Spa Yellow Pearl  2001 Acura NSX
Stealth Gray  2006 Cadillac CTS
Steel Gray metallic  2005 Saab 93 Convertible
Sterling Silver Metallic  1988-1989 Buick Reatta
Stormy Blue Mica  2010 Mazda CX-7
Sublime Green  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Summit White  2017 GMC Canyon Source: brochure scan
Sundance Gold Metallic  2001 Acura CL
Taffeta White  2001 Acura CL, 2001 Acura Integra and 2001 Acura TL
Taillight  Glidden/Disney Cars interior house paint Source: scan of paint chip
Torch Red  2006 Ford Mustang
Torred  2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Source: online color chart
Torrid Red  2004 Pontiac GTO
Tungsten Grey Metallic  2006 Ford Mustang
Velocity Yellow Tintcoat  2007 Chevrolet Corvette
Vermont Green Pearl  2001 Acura RL
Victory Red  2007 Chevrolet Corvette
Vista Blue Metallic  2006 Ford Mustang
Vivid Red  2006 Mercury Mariner Hybrid
Vivid Red Metallic  2005 Lincoln Aviator
Vogue Silver Metallic  2001 Acura Integra
Voltage Blue Metallic  2001 Acura Integra
White Diamond  2006 Cadillac CTS
White Diamond Pearl  2001 Acura TL
Windveil Blue Metallic  2006 Ford Mustang
Yellow Jacket  2004 Pontiac GTO




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