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Glossary of Automotive Terms

American Government Special Collections Reference Desk

Glossary of Automotive Terms

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This Glossary is a collection of general automotive terms that are not specific enough to have a topic page created for them.  Not only are there current definitions, but also terms and definitions that have fallen out of usage presented here for historical perspective.



M
Mad-RockMadison, Wisconsin & Rockford, Illinois Metro areas including Janesville and Beloit. This area is shared by I-90/I-39. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Magic City, TheBirmingham, Alabama. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
main beamMain-beam (also called high, driving, or full beam) headlamps provide an intense, centre-weighted distribution of light with no particular control of glare. Therefore, they are only suitable for use when alone on the road, as the glare they produce will dazzle other drivers. ECE and Japanese Regulations permit higher-intensity, high-beam headlamps than allowed under US regulations. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
Mama BearA female law enforcement officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Man-you-stinkThe small town of Manistique, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Manettino dialManettino dials are a part of some modern Ferrari cars (beginning with the Ferrari F430 in 2004). These adjustment dials are mounted on the steering wheel, usually just underneath the center of the wheel. The Manettino (Italian: little lever) is inspired by the controls found on F1 steering wheels, but have a more polished appearance. The dial allows for the quick and simple adjustment of the electronics governing suspension settings, traction control, electronic differential, and change speed of electronic gearbox. A similar control system was employed on the Ferrari Enzo, but used individual buttons for different settings rather than a single rotary switch. (Wikipedia: Manettino dial)
manifold absolute pressure sensorThe manifold absolute pressure sensor (MAP sensor) is one of the sensors used in an internal combustion engine's electronic control system. Engines that use a MAP sensor are typically fuel injected. The manifold absolute pressure sensor provides instantaneous manifold pressure information to the engine's electronic control unit (ECU). The data is used to calculate air density and determine the engine's air mass flow rate, which in turn determines the required fuel metering for optimum combustion (see stoichiometry) and influence the advance or retard of ignition timing. A fuel-injected engine may alternatively use a mass airflow sensor (MAF sensor) to detect the intake airflow. A typical naturally aspirated engine configuration employs one or the other, whereas forced induction engines typically use both; a MAF sensor on the intake tract pre-turbo and a MAP sensor on the charge pipe leading to the throttle body. (Wikipedia: MAP sensor)
marblesPieces of rubber from tires that accumulate on the racing surface outside of the racing line that are slippery like toy marbles. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Marmite car Named for a British savory spread, known for being an acquired taste that people either love or hate but are rarely indifferent towards, a "Marmite car" is a car that inspires strong reactions of love or hate, or an offbeat car that's considered an acquired taste.
marshalA person responsible for signaling track conditions to drivers (through use of flags), extinguishing fires, removing damaged cars from the track and sometimes providing emergency first aid. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
marshmallowA Swift truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
mass airflow sensorA mass (air) flow sensor (MAF) is used to find out the mass flow rate of air entering a fuel-injected internal combustion engine. The air mass information is necessary for the engine control unit (ECU) to balance and deliver the correct fuel mass to the engine. Air changes its density as it expands and contracts with temperature and pressure. In automotive applications, air density varies with the ambient temperature, altitude and the use of forced induction, which means that mass flow sensors are more appropriate than volumetric flow sensors for determining the quantity of intake air in each cylinder. (Wikipedia: Mass flow sensor)
Mass-a-Two-ShitsMassachusetts. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
matutu A 14-seat minibus van.
mausoleum mandatesA slang term for mandates by automakers for dealerships to enlarge their showrooms and change their appearance to corporate standards.
meat wagonAmbulance. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
meatballA specific racing flag used in some countries to indicate to a competitor there is a defect with the car which has the potential to cause a safety risk to the competitor or to another competitor. Most usually applied to trailing smoke or loose bodywork. The flag is black with a large orange dot in the centre of the flag, looking vaguely like a meatball. Some racing series use this flag to indicate the car being flagged is no longer being scored, due to ignoring orders to pit because of a rules infraction. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
meth(drag racing) Refers to methanol injection used in conjunction with racing gasoline. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
metric cruiserA motorcycle in the style of the American cruiser (most commonly Harley-Davidson) built by a non-American company. The name comes from the metric size nuts & bolts used in the construction.
Mexican roadblock A slang term for when two (or more, as many as there are lanes) trucks drive side-by-side at the speed limit or slower, blocking traffic behind them. This is believed to be due to illegal immigrants driving under the speed limit to avoid getting pulled over. See also: elephant race.
Mickey Mouse cornerA pejorative term for a corner or series of corners on a circuit that are thought to be poorly designed, slow, uncompetitive, uninteresting, and usually difficult or near impossible to overtake through, which detract from the overall challenge of the course. In some cases where the entire course is deemed poorly designed, it can be referred to as a "Mickey Mouse track." (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Mickey Mouse TownsLocation of the Walt Disney theme parks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
microcarStraddling the boundary between car and motorbike, these vehicles have engines under 1.0 litre, typically seat only two passengers, and are sometimes unorthodox in construction. Some microcars are three-wheelers, while the majority have four wheels. Microcars were popular in post-war Europe, where their appearance led them to be called "Bubble cars". More recent microcars are often electric powered. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
microvanTerm for a boxy wagon-type of car that is smaller than a conventional minivan; often without rear sliding door(s). Examples are Citroën Picasso, Renault Scénic, Toyota Yaris Verso or Mercedes-Benz A-Class. In Japan, this term is used for Kei car based vans. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
midsize carA class described as "large family" in Europe and "mid-size" in the USA, these cars have room for five adults and a large trunk (boot). Engines are more powerful than small family/compact cars and six-cylinder engines are more common than in smaller cars. Car sizes vary from region to region; in Europe, large family cars are rarely over 4,700 mm (15.4 ft) long, while in North America, Middle East and Australasia they may be well over 4,800 mm (15.7 ft). (Wikipedia: Car classification)
military carrierTruck carrying Hummers, soldiers, even Tanks, other military equipment. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
millAny internal combustion engine used in a race car (inherited from hot rodding slang). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
MiniacA fan of the Mini, a portmanteau of Mini and maniac.
minibusDesigned to carry fewer people than a full-size bus, generally up to 16 people in multiple rows of seats. Passenger access in normally via a sliding door on one side of the vehicle. One example of a van with a minibus version available is the Ford Transit. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
miscibleA pair of liquids that dissolve in each other in any proportion.
Miss PiggyA female law enforcement officer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
missing man formationThe vehicle on the pole position drops back a row during a pace lap to salute a deceased motorsport personality. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Mistake On The LakeChicago, Illinois—also Cleveland, Ohio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
mobile chicaneDisparaging slang. A competitor noticeably slower than the front running pace, so slow as to be a 'chicane that moves around the track'. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
mobile parking lotA large car hauler (18 wheeler). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
moldingAutomotive molding or car body molding are decorative and protective moldings on the car body. The term applies both to the detail and the material. (Wikipedia: Automotive molding)
Monkey TownMontgomery, Alabama. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
monsoon wetIncreasingly common nickname for an extreme weather version of the wet weather tyre. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
monsoonshieldA window deflector is mounted above the doors of some automobiles, to protect the inside of the car from rain or other precipitation in case of slightly opened windows. Additionally, it may help to prevent precipitation entering the interior in case of an opened door, e.g. dropping from the roof or directly from the air. Deflectors are also fitted to sunroofs to deviate wind. It is also known as a "monsoonshield" or a "rain visor" (in countries without monsoon). The primary purpose of window deflectors is to prevent dust, snow, rain, other precipitation or excessive wind from entering to the cabin. Also, window deflectors direct air flows over the vehicle, and thus, reduce the wind noise when driving on moderate speeds. Window deflectors can be installed directly in the window channel or attached to the vehicle's body in the sunroof or side window area using 3M automotive-grade adhesive tape. Window deflectors are common accessory in the automotive aftermarket. Being vehicle-specific, they are normally designed to fit individual car, truck or SUV models. (Wikipedia: Window deflector)
moonroofA sultry term for a glass sunroof that lets light in while closed. Examples include Acura ILX, and Pontiac G6. (Wikipedia: Sunroof)
motion lotionFuel (usually Diesel, since large trucks seldom run on gasoline.) (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Motor AgateAlso known as Detroit agate or Fordite, is old automobile paint which has hardened sufficiently to be cut and polished. It was formed from the buildup of layers of enamel paint slag on tracks and skids on which cars were hand spray-painted (a now automated process), which have been baked numerous times. In recent times the material has been upcycled into eco-friendly jewelry. (Wikipedia: Fordite) The layers formed from the frequent changing of paint colors resemble a kind of bright rainbow sandstone.
Motor CityDetroit, Michigan. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
motor insuranceInsurance purchased by the owner of a vehicle to cover losses due to traffic accidents or theft. Synonyms:  car insurance, auto insurance. (Wiktionary, 2012)
Motorsport ValleyA tag given to the mid-south of England by the Motorsport Industry Association where high concentration of activities within the motorsport industry on and off track occur. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Mountain FolkThe mountains of rural Western North Carolina to the Tennessee State Line. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
mountain motorTerm for large-displacement engines, often used in hot rods and drag racers. Named for their size (over 8,100 cubic centimetres, or 500 cubic inches, the limit in some sanctioning bodies), and for being constructed in the mountains of Tennessee and North Carolina. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
mudflapA mudflap or mud guard is used in combination with the vehicle fender to protect the vehicle, passengers, other vehicles, and pedestrians from mud and other flying debris thrown into the air by the rotating tire. A mudflap is typically made from a flexible material such as rubber that is not easily damaged by contact with flying debris, the tire, or the road surface. Mudflaps can be large rectangular sheets suspended behind the tires, or may be small molded lips below the rear of the vehicle's wheel wells. Mudflaps can be aerodynamically engineered, utilizing shaping, louvers or vents to improve airflow and lower drag. While some flaps are plain, in the colour of rubber, many contain company logos, other art or sometimes advertisements. Another is the mudflap girl, a woman's silhouette. In the United States, there are mudflap regulations that vary from state to state. (Wikipedia: mudflap)
multi-purpose vehicle(MPV) A large car or small bus designed to be used on and off-road and easily convertible to facilitate loading of goods from facilitating carrying people. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
MurrayismA funny term or phrase originally uttered during a broadcast, by and named in honour of veteran Formula One broadcaster, Murray Walker. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
muscle carThe muscle car term generally refers to rear wheel drive mid-size car or full-size cars with powerful V8 engines, manufactured in the U.S. Some definitions limit it to two-door vehicles; however, others include four-door body style versions. Although opinions vary, it is generally accepted that classic muscle cars were produced in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Muscle cars were also produced in Australia and other nations. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
Music TownNashville, Tennessee. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
my balls are saggingAnother way of saying "parts are falling off the truck." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
mystery cautionAn unknown condition caution in the closing laps of a race called for the purpose of closing up the field, typically to create a Green/White/Checkered shoot-out finish. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
N
NACA ductA distinctively shaped inlet that is flush and begins with a narrow, shallow inset and becomes progressively wider and deeper. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
nap trapMotel or rest stop. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
NationalsMost NHRA events are called Nationals, referring to the first race held by the NHRA in a parking lot in Pomona, California, called simply, "The Nationals." (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
New Jersey TermiteThe New Jersey Turnpike. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Nickel CityBuffalo, New York. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ninja rockA chunk (or "rock") of spark plug insulator. Because insulator is harder than automobile glass, it can be thrown or slingshot at car windows to shatter them easily.
nitroNitromethane (sometimes incorrectly used to refer to nitrous oxide). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
nitrousRefers to nitrous oxide systems manufactured by a wide range of companies. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
NodakThe State of North Dakota. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
not classifiedA driver was racing at the end of the race, but did not complete the required distance to be classified. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Not too SwiftDerogatory nickname for a Swift truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
notchbackA configuration where the third box of a three-box styling configuration is less pronounced — especially where the rear deck (third box) is short or where the rear window is upright. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
O
oberklasse Also known as full-size luxury cars, grand saloons, or premium large cars, while "Oberklasse" is used in Germany. Typically a four-door saloon (sedan). These are the most powerful saloons, with six, eight and twelve-cylinder engines and have more equipment than smaller models. Vehicles in this category include some of the models from the flagship lines of luxury car brands, such as Cadillac CT6, Lincoln Town Car and Maserati Quattroporte. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
obscuration bandBlack Graphite printed onto the glass to hide unsightly areas and improve aesthetics. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
observerThe highest ranking trackside marshal within the post; the main decision maker at the event of an incident, they relay information to the race control. Can be seen standing in the marshal post. Second to Chief Marshal. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
office on wheelsOffice workers using the car as an office while in traffic. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
oildown(drag racing) When a car's engine or lubrication breaks during a run, leaving a streak of oil and other fluids on the track. This is punishable by fines, point penalties, and/or suspension. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Okie CityOklahoma City, Oklahoma where I-40, I-35 and I-44 all cross paths. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
OldsmosliderOldsmobile car or station wagon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
one-box formA categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the One-Box, also called a monospace or monovolume, it is a single continuous volume. Slight wedge formed front or rear are still generally placed in this category. e.g., Bus, original Ford Econoline. The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "1-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
one-make racingRacing equipment that must be identical for all competitors, usually to cut down on costs or for business purposes by car manufacturers. Known in North America as spec, specific parts can be spec, as in the IndyCar Series' spec engine, or the type of car can be spec, as in spec racing series such as Spec Miata. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
oooooooopsAn obnoxious way to get attention for purposes of being informative. Word said on CB referring to an accident or a police traffic stop, "Oooops at the 49." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
open wheel carA specific type of racing car in which the wheels are not enclosed by bodywork of the car, e.g.: Formula One. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
out lapThe first lap to be completed after exiting the pit lane, either during a race or during practice or qualifying. Also known as a reconnaissance lap if it is not taken at race speed, e.g. when a car leaves the pit lane to take up its position on the grid prior to the race start. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
out-brakeGaining time or position by braking harder and deeper in a corner. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
outbanderOne who operates an illegally modified CB radio, often broadcasting outside the regulated frequencies. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
outright lap recordFastest lap recorded at a circuit of any category of race car. Most often this does not include qualifying and practice laps but confusingly some sources occasionally include laps not recorded during races. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
outside flame ignitorAn outside flame ignitor was an early ignition device used in internal-combustion engines that used a flame outside the engine and a sliding port on the cylinder head. At the appropriate time in the compression cycle of the engine, the port would briefly be opened and closed allowing the fuel/air mixture in the cylinder to be ignited by the flame. They had many problems, including partial loss of compression through the port when it opened and many mechanical problems with the mechanism that operated the port. They were considered obsolete before 1911. (Wikipedia: Outside flame ignitor)
over and outPhrase meaning the CB'er is stopping talking and either turning the CB off or going to another channel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Over-the-Tank HankName given as an insult to another man implying that person is a homosexual. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
overdrive(drag racing) The ratio between the revolutions of the supercharger to the revolutions of the engine, controlling amount of boost; see underdrive. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
overhangThe distance which the car's body extends beyond the wheelbase at the front (front overhang) and rear (rear overhang). In car style design terms, this is the amount of body that is beyond the wheels or wheel arches. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
overpowering the trackA drag racing term used when talking about a run when the driver loses traction. It is normally used to talk about the actions of the team crew chief. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
oversteerCornering behaviour where the rear wheels do not track behind the front wheels but instead move out toward the outside of the turn. Opposite of understeer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
oxygen sensorAn oxygen sensor (or lambda sensor) is an electronic device that measures the proportion of oxygen (O2) in the gas or liquid being analysed. The most common application is to measure the exhaust gas concentration of oxygen for internal combustion engines in automobiles and other vehicles in order to calculate and, if required, dynamically adjust the air fuel ratio so that catalytic converters can work optimally, and also determine whether a catalytic converter is performing properly or not (Wikipedia: Oxygen sensor)
P
pace notesIn rally racing, notes that describe the course in great detail. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
packageAn automotive package is a set of optional automobile features that are included in a bundle that is installed at the factory (this is, they are added to the standard features). In some cases, elements from multiple packages may be combined to create a model level. Such mixing of packages is common in imported vehicles, where it is relatively difficult to produce specific combinations to a customer's order owing to relatively long shipping times. For example, a high level luxury package may include a premium sound system, projector headlights, a navigation system, and side curtain air bags,and heat seats with this particular combination sold only as a high level model, with some designation such as "DX" (delux), "LE" (luxury edition), "SE" (special edition) and "ES" (electric standard). Package is also an industry term for the job of defining the basic architecture of the vehicle. This includes figuring out how to fit the engine, transmission and passengers into the car, and what the ground clearance will be. (Wikipedia: Automotive package)
PackardbakerThe Packards for 1957 and 1958 were essentially Studebaker Presidents with large amounts of bright work. (Studebaker-Packard Corporation: Packardbaker)
PackertownGreen Bay, Wisconsin, home of the Green Bay Packers football team. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
paddockAn enclosure at a track used by team support personnel and vehicles, and other officials and VIPs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
PanamShortened slang term for the Carrera Panamericana, the famous Mexican border-to-border race of the 1950's.
Pancake CityLiberal, Kansas, host of the Fat Tuesday Pancake Race. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
panel truckA panel truck in U.S. and Canadian usage is a small delivery truck with a fully enclosed body. It typically has no rear windows in the rear cargo area and is a van built on a truck chassis. (Wikipedia: Panel truck)
pantsThe original name for fender skirts, used by Frank Lockhart to describe a streamlining effect on a 1928 Stutz land speed record attempt car. Known in Australia and the United Kingdom as spats, pants are pieces of bodywork on the fender that cover the upper portions of the rear tires of an automobile. (Wikipedia) Hot Rods and Racing Cars #2 - January 1952
Papa BearA police supervisor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Paper HangerPolice giving speeding ticket. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
parade lapA lap before a motorsport race begins where the drivers go around the track at a slow speed, also known as a formation lap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
parc ferméAn area which cars enter after they have qualified for the race, where they are not allowed to be worked upon by mechanics unless on strict supervision by the stewards. Some motorsports series other than Formula One refer to this as the Impound. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
parking lamps"Front position lamps", known as "parking lamps" or "parking lights" in the US, Canada and Australia and "front sidelights" in the UK provide nighttime standing-vehicle conspicuity. They were designed to use little electricity, so they could be left on for periods of time while parked. Despite the UK term, these are not the same as the side marker lights described below. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
pay driverA driver who pays for his race seat rather than receiving a salary from the team. Generally has a negative connotation. Sometimes known as a Ride Buyer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pay wagonan armored car, usually full of money as it goes from place to place, then to a bank. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pay-as-you-driveConverts automotive insurance from a fixed to a per mile cost, providing a financial incentive to drive less. (Federal Highway Administration, 2012)
pedalfestWhere both cars in a drag race break traction and the drivers have to work the throttle to get the car to regain traction, but keep the car going fast enough to win the race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pedallingWorking the throttle in a drag race to avoid lighting the tires, or as a way to sandbag; "pedalled" it, had to "pedal" it. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
The PegWinnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
penalty boxA cheap and undesirable economy car, which for many decades were boxy in shape.
people carrierEuropean name to describe what is usually referred to in North America as a Minivan. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
perua Brazilian Portuguese term either designating a van (especially as spoken in the city of São Paulo) or a station wagon (in the city of Rio de Janeiro). (Wikipedia: Car classification)
PeteA Peterbilt tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
PetercarA Peterbilt tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
phaetonAn open vehicle, usually with 4 doors, with a removable and/or retractable cloth top and a windshield characterized by the lack of integrated glass side windows. Contemporary uses of this name do not always follow this original description or apply to an open vehicle. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
photo finishA finish in which two or more cars are so close that in times past a photograph of the finishers crossing the finish line would need to be studied to determine the finishing order. While the practice has been mostly superseded by modern electronic timing systems, the location of the transponder in a vehicle is not located near the nose of the vehicle, so stewards often use video replays to detect where the nose (of a car) or wheel (of a motorcycle) crosses the finish line first. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pickle parkAn interstate rest area frequented by prostitutes. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
picture-takerA law officer monitoring traffic with a radar gun. Today, this can also refer to an automated speed camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Pie CarPacific Intermountain Express (PIE) truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
piggy bankan armored car, usually full of money as it goes from place to place, then to a bank. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pillA power transistor in an illegal linear amplifier. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pillarA structural member that connects the roof to the body of the car. Pillars are usually notated from front to back alphabetically (e.g. A-pillar joins the windshield to the frontmost side windows, B-pillar is next to the front occupants' heads, etc.). US DOT Term: Means any structure, excluding glazing and the vertical portion of door window frames, but including accompanying molding, attached components such as safety belt anchorages and coat hooks, that (1) supports either a roof or any other structure (such as a roll-bar) above the driver's head or (2) is located along a side edge of a window. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
pillarlessUsually a prefix to coupé, fastback, or hardtop; completely open at the sides when the windows are down, without a central pillar, e.g. the Sunbeam Rapier fastback coupé. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
piston ringA thin, narrow elastic ring which fits into a circumferential groove in the piston. The ring is cut through on one side to allow it to expand and press against the cylinder wall. Source: Automobile Catechism 1910
pit boardA board that is held up from the pit wall to the side of the finishing straight when a driver goes past, to confirm their position in the race and the amount of laps remaining. Before the introduction of radio communication, also used to instruct drivers to pit for fuel and/or tires, or to comply with rules violations. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pit stopStopping in the pit lane for repairs, refuelling, and/or new tires. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pit wallWhere the team owners and managers sit to observe the race, opposite the garages in the pit lane. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Pitman armThe Pitman arm is a steering component in an automobile or truck. As a linkage attached to the steering box (see recirculating ball) sector shaft, it converts the angular motion of the sector shaft into the linear motion needed to steer the wheels. The arm is supported by the sector shaft and supports the drag link or center link with a ball joint. It transmits the motion it receives from the steering box into the drag (or center) link, causing it to move left or right to turn the wheels in the appropriate direction. The idler arm is attached between the opposite side of the center link from the Pitman arm and the vehicle's frame to hold the center or drag link at the proper height. A worn ball joint can cause play in the steering, and may get worse over time. (Wikipedia: Pitman arm)
Pittsburgh Garbage TruckA PGT truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pixel carsSlang term for virtual race cars or online racing.
Plain Brown WrapperUnmarked police car (Often referred to by the car's actual color). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
plenumThe area at the base of the windshield where the wipers are parked. Also refers to the main chamber in an intake manifold. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
plug-in hybrid electric vehicleA hybrid vehicle that can be plugged into the electric grid to recharge its battery to reduce gasoline usage. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)
Polar BearAn all-white highway patrol car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pole positionThe first grid position, placed closest to the starting line (in Formula One), nearest the inside of the first turn, or both. Usually reserved for the competitor who has recorded the fastest lap during qualifying. A competitor who starts a race there is said to be on the pole. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Polish victory lapIn American stock car racing, a victory lap done in reverse, with the driver's window closer to the fans. Named for Polish-American racer Alan Kulwicki, who was known for driving his victory laps this way. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pollen filterAnother name for a cabin air filter.
Pollock ExpressPacific Intermountain Express (PIE) truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
PolvoA portmanteau of Polestar and Volvo, referring to Polestar-developed Volvos and the Volvo-based Polestar cars.
polystyreneThe type of plastic commonly used in model car production.  It is a flammable synthetic polymer made from styrene, a monomer derived from petroleum.
PonchoA Pontiac car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ponton stylingA 1930s–1960s design genre when distinct running boards and fully articulated fenders became less common and bodywork began to enclose the full width and uninterrupted length of a car in a markedly bulbous, slab-sided fashion. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
pony carThe pony car is a class of American Muscle car automobile launched and inspired by the Ford Mustang in 1964. It describes an affordable, compact, highly styled car with a sporty or performance-oriented image. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
Pony ExpressMail hauler. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Poor BoyA Peterbilt tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
popping the blower(drag racing) When an intake valve hangs open, allowing the igniting fuel in the combustion chamber to leave the chamber. This, in turn, causes the fuel in the intake manifold to explode, blowing the blower off the top of the motor. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Pork Chop ExpressA FedEx truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pork steerThe tendency of a vehicle to lean towards the driver's side when an obese driver is heavy enough to affect the vehicle's suspension. A pun on the term "torque steer." (English slang)
porky pigPerson using an amateur radio callsign (as opposed to a handle) or procedure on CB. Using amateur radio practices on CB is not illegal in itself, but is considered awkward or out-of-place. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
portable barn yardCattle or hog truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
portable gas stationA tank truck carrying fuel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
portable parking lotA large car hauler (18 wheeler). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
poverty specA base model version of a vehicle. (British English slang)
power brakesAutomobile brakes originally were made without vacuum or electric aids of any sort. When vacuum assist was invented, cars with this technology were said to have "power brakes" to until such a time came about that the technology was standard on just about every car made.
power bulgeA power bulge is a raised part (a bulge) of the hood of a car. The reason for a power bulge is to fit, for instance, a large engine or air filters that otherwise would not fit. Sometimes a power bulge is used to be able to fit a larger engine into a car that originally was not designed for it or it may be a design choice to be able to get a lower profile. As a power bulge is associated with performance cars, it may also be used as a design element to give the impression of a fast car. (Wikipedia: Power bulge)
powertrainAll the components that generate power and deliver it to the road surface. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)

All the components that generate power and deliver it to the tyres. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
PP Guy A police officer with the Ontario Provincial Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
pre-qualifyingA preliminary qualifying session held prior to a regular qualifying session in order to reduce the number of competitors taking part in the regular session, usually for safety reasons. An example of pre-qualifying is in Formula One in the late 1980s and early 1990s. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pre runnerOriginally it was a purpose-built off road vehicle used to "pre-run" an off road desert race to log the logistics of the course before the actual race is run with the racing vehicle. Current usage has come to mean vehicles built in the pre runner style (most prominently the front bumper replaced by light bar, high riding suspension with long travel).
pregnant rollerskateA Volkswagen Beetle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
primary air shut-offA damper inserted in the air intake of a carburetor which is normally kept open, but which, when closed, causes the carburetor to deliver a very rich mixture in order to facilitate starting the motor. Syn: Air damper, starting shutter. Also an adjustable valve in the main air intake of the carburetor used in regulating the quality of the fuel mixture. (A Dictionary of Automobile Terms (1913))
privateerA competitor not directly supported by a sponsor or manufacturer. To be privately funded. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pro tree(drag racing) Timing lights which flash all three yellow lights simultaneously, and after four tenths of a second, turn green. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
progressive gridWhere a category races multiple times at a meeting, the starting order for the grid is decided by the finishing order of the previous race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
protecting and servingOfficer with a car pulled over. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
prototypeAn endurance sports racing car that does not noticeably look like a standard production model. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
puke can(drag racing) Radiator overflow tank, sometimes, used beer cans are used as puke cans, although, on some tracks, these types of modifications are considered illegal. A standard puke can is usually made of plastic, or some high strength polymer, and attached close to the radiator. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pulling an EckmanA term in drag racing, particularly in Pro Stock, when a driver is cited, and fined for racing with a nitrous oxide system; driver Jerry Eckman was the first driver in the NHRA to be indefinitely suspended for such an infraction; he was reinstated after two years. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pumpkin/pumpkin rollerA Schneider National truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Push-to-PassSystem in which engine power is increased for short periods to create a short burst of extra speed. This can be done by increasing the boost pressure in a turbocharged car, increasing the maximum rpm, or using a separate system to provide power. Also, see KERS. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pushCornering behaviour where the front wheels do not follow the steered course but instead push out toward the outside of the turn. Known as push in NASCAR and other stock car racing. Opposite of oversteer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
pusholineFuel (usually Diesel, since large trucks seldom run on gasoline.) (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
put on the trailerWhen a driver has either lost (got "put on the trailer") or won (put the other driver on the trailer). Named because losing drivers pull their vehicle home on a trailer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Q
qualifierA qualifying race before the main event, where non-qualified cars compete for a predetermined number of spots in the main event. Some races have a C-main where the top finisher(s) qualify for the B-main. At those events, the main event is known as the "A-main". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
qualifyingThe process of deciding the starting order of a race. See also pre-qualifying. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
quarter-panel(or rear quarter panel) refers to the panel at the back sides starting at the rear edge of the rearmost doors, bordered by at top by the trunk (boot) lid and at bottom by the rear wheel arches ending at the rear bumper. This is the opposite of the fender. Literally, the term originally referred to the rear quarter or the car's length. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
Queen CityCharlotte, North Carolina, Cincinnati, Ohio, Buffalo, New York or Springfield, Missouri. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Queer TownProvincetown, MA or the San Francisco area. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Quick 8Quickest eight cars in a defined drag racing event. Rules appear to can differ per location/race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
R
race directorAn official appointed by a series organiser who holds ultimate authority over race operations throughout every event of a championship. The race director is the senior official present, and controls the activities of the local Clerk of the Course and marshals and the other staff appointed by the series. When appointed, they hold the responsibility of deploying the safety car and starting and stopping sessions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
racing back to the stand (or zone)If two cabs drop off at the same spot, they might race back to our zone to get in line ahead of the other guy. Racing poses an interesting challenge, as the car is yellow and easy to see, plus the boss's phone number is on the side. Civilians like to call that number and complain. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)
racing lineThe fastest path around a circuit. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Radio CarEither a marked or unmarked state trooper vehicle sporting additional antenna on the trunk or sides of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ragtopOriginally an open car like a roadster, but with a soft top (cloth top) that can be raised or lowered. Unlike a convertible, it had no roll-up side windows. Now often used as slang for a convertible. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
railDragster (as distinct from bodied car or flopper). From the exposed frame rails of early cars. Usually refers to early short-wheelbase cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
rain visorA window deflector is mounted above the doors of some automobiles, to protect the inside of the car from rain or other precipitation in case of slightly opened windows. Additionally, it may help to prevent precipitation entering the interior in case of an opened door, e.g. dropping from the roof or directly from the air. Deflectors are also fitted to sunroofs to deviate wind. It is also known as a "monsoonshield" or a "rain visor" (in countries without monsoon). The primary purpose of window deflectors is to prevent dust, snow, rain, other precipitation or excessive wind from entering to the cabin. Also, window deflectors direct air flows over the vehicle, and thus, reduce the wind noise when driving on moderate speeds. Window deflectors can be installed directly in the window channel or attached to the vehicle's body in the sunroof or side window area using 3M automotive-grade adhesive tape. Window deflectors are common accessory in the automotive aftermarket. Being vehicle-specific, they are normally designed to fit individual car, truck or SUV models. (Wikipedia: Window deflector)
rainoutWhen a race is delayed or cancelled due to rain, or the threat of rain. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
rakeThe first application of the term "rake" in vehicles was probably the tilting back of the windshield's top. Nowadays rake refers to the angle between the overall vehicle and the horizontal axis of the ground. If the back is higher than the front, you have positive rake. If the front is higher than the back, you have negative rake. In early hot rod and custom cars, positive rake was created by varying tire size, and/or by suspension modification. In today's body design, positive rake is integral with some vehicles' styling, e.g. Mercedes E350 sedan, circa 2012/13. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
raking the leavesThe last person in the convoy, who would watch out for troopers coming from behind. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ramp runIn a practice lap, to rev the engine as far as possible without changing gears to allow engine management systems to take Lambda readings of the fuel to air ratio across a smooth engine revolution range. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
ratchetjawAn obnoxious person talking non-stop and saying nothing. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
re-powerA truck taking a load from another truck that cannot make the destination. This is usually done if the original truck has broken down, the previous driver has run out of hours, or if the load has a long way to go and needs a team that can run with the load 24/7 and to get the load to the destination faster. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
reaction timeIn drag racing, it refers to the time it takes for a driver to leave the starting line after the green light. This time can mean the difference between a win and loss, especially in closely matched races. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
reactive suspensionA system by which the suspension is controlled by computer to maintain an optimum distance above the racing surface, regardless of forces acting upon the car and changes in the racing surface, thus maximising the aerodynamic assistance that can be gained by running the car close to the ground. Developed originally by Team Lotus in Formula One. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
rear position lampsConspicuity for the rear of a vehicle is provided by rear position lamps (also called taillamps or tail lamps, taillights, or tail lights). These are required to produce only red light and to be wired such that they are lit whenever the front position lamps are lit, including when the headlamps are on. Rear position lamps may be combined with the vehicle's stop lamps or separate from them. In combined-function installations, the lamps produce brighter red light for the stop lamp function and dimmer red light for the rear position lamp function. Regulations worldwide stipulate minimum intensity ratios between the bright (stop) and dim (rear position) modes, so that a vehicle displaying rear position lamps will not be mistakenly interpreted as showing stop lamps, and vice versa. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
rear-facing-only seatA child restraint system designed for use only by a young child in a rear-facing position. Also called an Infant car seat. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
rear-facingRefers to the position where the child's car seat is turned to face the back of the vehicle. The rear-facing position supports the entire head, neck, and back, cradles and moves with the child to reduce stress to the neck and spinal cord in a crash. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
recallsVoluntary or required actions taken by manufacturers in conjunction with NHTSA to correct problems or deficiencies after products have been distributed or sold. Manufacturers must offer free repair or replacement for products recalled for violations of safety standards. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
recline adjustorAdjusts the angle of the car seat so the child is in the proper position in either the rear-facing or forward-facing position (when child has outgrown the seat limits for rear-facing use). (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
recovery pointA recovery point is a part of a car which can be used to recover the vehicle if it becomes stuck (bogged.) Recovering a vehicle using a recovery point involves attaching a winch or a snatch strap to the recovery point. Recovery points should be rated - that is, should say what load they are designed to take. Using non-rated parts of a vehicle to recover it can be extremely dangerous.Recovery points may be fitted by the manufacturer, or as an after-market modification. (Wikipedia: Recovery point)
Red WheelPolice patrol car with single rotating red roof light, such as those used by the Michigan State Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
redlightIn drag racing, a.k.a. bulb—jump the start, left before tree turned green. This is a loss unless a more serious (opponent crossing the center boundary line) foul occurs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
redlightedIn drag racing, a.k.a. bulb—jumped the start, left before tree turned green. This is a loss unless a more serious (opponent crossing the center boundary line) foul occurs. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
reeferA refrigerated trailer, used for transporting foodstuffs and other perishable cargo. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
regenerative shock absorberA regenerative shock absorber is a type of shock absorber that converts parasitic intermittent linear motion and vibration into useful energy, such as electricity. Conventional shock absorbers simply dissipate this energy as heat. When used in an electric vehicle or hybrid electric vehicle the electricity generated by the shock absorber can be diverted to its powertrain to increase battery life. In non-electric vehicles the electricity can be used to power accessories such as air conditioning. Several different systems have been developed recently, though they are still in stages of development and not installed on production vehicles. (Wikipedia: Regenerative shock absorber)
registration cardA postage-paid return card that comes with every car seat; should be returned to the manufacturer so owners can be notified of any recalls. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
relief driverA driver who fills in for another driver in case of injury, or during a race because of exhaustion or pain. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
rescue alleyEnglish translation of the German term "Rettungsgasse." A clear path in slowly moving traffic, to be used by emergency vehicles, created by the vehicles waiting in traffic moving to the sides of the lanes and leaving an open lane in the middle.
resin castingA method of creating parts for model cars using synthetic resin.  The synthetic resin for such processes is a monomer for making plastic thermosetting polymer.  During the setting process, the liquid monomer polymerizes into the polymer, thereby hardening into a solid. (Wikipedia)  This method is used for small scale, often home-based production due to its low initial investment.
restartThe race is started again after a caution or other condition that stopped the race. In the case of a restart from a caution period on an oval track and most road courses, this is accomplished by the safety car pulling off the track, the green flag/light being displayed, and cars simply accelerating back to race speeds. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
retractable hardtopAlso Coupé convertible or Coupé Cabriolet. A type of convertible forgoing a foldable textile roof in favor of a multi-segment rigid roof retracts into the lower bodywork. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
retractorA mechanism that works with the seat belts to gather and store extra seat belt webbing. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
Rettungsgasse A clear path in slowly moving traffic, to be used by emergency vehicles, created by the vehicles waiting in traffic moving to the sides of the lanes and leaving an open lane in the middle. Translation: rescue alley.
RevellogramA portmanteau of Revell and Monogram, referring to model kits that were at one time co-branded "Revell-Monongram."
reverse grid racingWhen the starting order of a race is reversed, so that the driver on pole position, starts last. Occasionally reverse grid is limited to only part of the grid, for example, just the top ten positions may be reversed. Often used to increase the entertainment value of a race, mainly used when a category races several times over the course of a meeting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Richie RoachSomeone in a limousine. Taken from comments made by Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity regarding liberals riding in limousines. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ride away theftA type of motorcycle theft where the vehicle is ridden away as opposed to picked up and loaded onto another vehicle. It requires the wheels to be unlocked/rotatable. See also: roll away theft.
ride theftStealing a fare from another cabbie. A driver will hear a bell come across the radio, know the position of the car who got the bell, and beat him to the pickup. Obviously, this is a smuggled ride. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)
riding mechanicAn early term for a co-driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

In the early days of automobile racing, race cars had a second seat for a mechanic who would monitor the car and keep watch over the driver's shoulder.  Also referred in terminology of the times as a "riding mechanician."
rifle barrelA bulk liquid trailer round in shape. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Rip-off RalphyA truck stop dope dealer who charges extremely high prices. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ripple stripConcrete kerb, usually placed on the inside of a corner, painted in chunks of colour, usually red and white alternately, hence the 'ripple'. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
roach coachLunch wagon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
road course ringer(NASCAR) A driver who generally competes only on road courses as a substitute for a team's primary driver. Such drivers are no longer used by top teams in the Sprint Cup Series due to competition changes in the 21st century, but are still frequently used by lower-tier Cup teams and teams in other NASCAR series. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Road Ho/Road JulietA female escort usually found at truck stops and rest areas. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
road pirate A term for unmarked police cars popular with "policing for profit" type enforcement.
Road PizzaAn animal that has been run over and flattened on the pavement. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
roadsterAn open vehicle, usually with 2 doors, with a removable and/or retractable cloth top and a windshield characterized by the lack of integrated glass side windows. Contemporary uses of this name do not always follow this original description. A classical roadster is a two-seater with a long hood and a short back, which means the driver is sitting in the rear of the vehicle (close to the rear axle). Usually it is a rear-wheel-driven car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
rock slidersRock sliders are an aftermarket accessory popular among four wheel drive vehicle owners who engage in more serious off-road driving. Rock sliders are typically made of heavy-duty box section steel, although they can also be made from tubular steel as well. They run along each side of the vehicle, from just behind the front wheel to just before the rear wheel, just below the level of the door sills. They are affixed to the vehicle's chassis, and their function is to protect the door sills and door bottoms from damage when crossing large obstacles (such as rocks - hence the name). (Wikipedia: Rock sliders)
rockerThe body section below the base of the door openings sometimes called the "rocker panels", or "sills". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
rocker railBody armor protecting the rocker, found mostly in off road vehicles. Term coined by engineers at MetalCloak. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
roll away theftA type of motorcycle theft where the vehicle is rolled away as opposed to picked up and loaded onto another vehicle. It requires the wheels to be unlocked/rotatable. See also: ride away theft.
roll cageNetwork of metal bars that criss-cross the interior of production-based sedan-bodied racing cars. Originally created as a safety device in more recent times it has been used to connect suspension, chassis, engine to substantially increase the torsional rigidity of a race car. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
roll hoopLooped bar protruding above and behind the drivers helmets in open wheel and prototype sports racing cars. The hoop is placed that in the event of a car rolling over in a crash the car lands on the roll hoop rather than the drivers helmet. It also makes a handy hook for cranes for removing stopped cars from dangerous positions on the circuit. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
rollerskateA compact or sports car, or mini pickup truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
rollin' coal (also rolling coal, coal rolling)  Driving while ejecting a large amount of black diesel exhaust.  So named because it resembles the dirty exhaust of an old coal-fired smoke stack on wheels.  Occasionally used as a protest of environmentalism.
rolling refineryA tank truck carrying fuel. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
rolling roadblockA term for when two (or more, as many as there are lanes) trucks drive side-by-side at the speed limit or slower, blocking traffic behind them. Slang terms for this include elephant race (or Elefantenrennen in German) and Mexican roadblock.
rolling startA starting method where moving cars start a race after the starter displays a green flag. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
roof flapAn aerodynamic piece designed to keep a car on the ground when it is traveling in reverse. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
roof moduleA roof module is a complete top for a convertible. Such tops can be a softtop or a retractable hardtop which is produced by specialized convertible top suppliers and supplied to the OEMs. The OEMs finally are completing their cars in their own production lines with these tops to a convertible. Depending on the OEM it is possible that these suppliers are working as a full service vehicle supplier and are producing the complete cars (e.g. Karmann, Heuliez or Pininfarina). Car Top Systems, Edscha and OASys (Automotive) are not full service vehicle suppliers and are delivering just the top to the OEMs. (Wikipedia: Roof module)
roof rackA roof rack is a set of bars secured to the roof of a motor car. It is used to carry bulky items such as luggage, bicycles, canoes, kayaks, skis, or various carriers and containers. There is a long history of the use of roof racks and their designs. They allow users of an automobile to transport objects on the roof of the vehicle without reducing interior space for occupants, or the cargo area volume limits such as in the typical car's trunk design. The three most common components of a roof rack system are (side) rails (or tracks), towers which clamp or otherwise attach to the rails, and mounts, which secure the bulky items to the rack system. Older roof racks were usually mounted directly to the gutter surrounding the roof line. More modern vehicles, which do not have gutters, can often have a roof rack installed by attaching hooks to the top of the door frames. Some automobiles have fittings for proprietary racks which mate with reinforced lugs in the roof. Other vehicles have a factory-installed permanent roof rack. Roof racks increase air resistance and in the US, roof racks increased overall fuel consumption by approximately 1%. Truck bed rack is a derivation of a roof rack designed to be installed over the bed of a pickup truck. The construction of a bed rack is very similar to a roof rack, but features tall tubes (legs) that allow to lift the rack platform higher above the bed surface and leave space for cargo inside of the bed. Truck bed racks are often used in a combination with roof racks and form a long cargo platform that allows transportation of oversized items. They are commonly used in constructions and recreation as a base for various gear and tents just like the roof racks. (Wikipedia: Roof rack)
roof tentA roof tent is an accessory which may be fitted to the roof of a motor vehicle which allows the users to sleep in relative safety and comfort above the vehicle, and leaves the internal load-space free. The first example of roof-tents appeared in Western Europe in the 1930s. Roof tents are particularly seen on expedition-prepared four wheel drive vehicles such as Land Rovers, but can be fitted to almost any vehicle. Generally they will mount to a vehicles roof rack or aftermarket roof bars. They are particularly popular in Italy and one manufacturer advertises them using photographs of their devices fitted to cars as small as the Fiat Panda. (Wikipedia: Roof tent)
roostIn off-road racing, the act of accelerating quickly in a corner to kick up dirt, dust, and rocks, usually in an effort to temporarily blind a trailing driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
rooster tailA spray of water that comes from the back of a car driving rapidly across wet pavement.  The shape of the spray, as viewed from the side, resembles the shape of a rooster's tail.
RottenchesterRochester, NY. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
rubber duckThe first vehicle in a convoy. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
rubberneckerVehicles that further slow down or impede already congested traffic by rotating their heads 180 degrees to view the accident or traffic incident and not paying attention to the road ahead. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
rubbing stripPlastic/rubber line or moulding to prevent side-swiping along the doors. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
rumble stripVariation of ripple strip with an upward-pointed, rounded saw-tooth edge. The saw-tooth effect is to discourage competitors from kerb-hopping. The saw-tooth creates a rumble sound and feel for the competitor when driven over. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
run-off areaAreas off the track put aside for vehicles to leave the track in case of emergency without accident. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
running boardA running board is a narrow step fitted under the side doors of a car or truck. It aids entry, especially into high vehicles, and is typical of vintage cars, which had much higher ground clearances than today's vehicles. It is also used as a fashion statement on vehicles that would not otherwise require it. The origin of the name running board is obscure; the first running boards predate automobiles and were installed on carriages as early as the 17th century. Whether the running board was named after the inventor or in reference to function is open to debate. In the early 20th century, all automobiles were equipped with running boards. The necessity of using them was caused by the fact that first cars were designed with a narrow, high body bolted to the chassis. A running board served as a step to a vehicle's cabin and was wide enough to serve as a place to sit or even lie down for an adult. During the 1920s and 1930s, car design was evolving rapidly to become more sleek and aerodynamic. It eliminated the need for running boards. The first automobile designed without running boards was the 1936 Cord. It changed the attitude towards running boards for many years ahead.(Wikipedia: Running board)
RustangA derogatory nickname for an old Ford Mustang.
S
Safe Driving AwardTraffic ticket while being pulled over by police or the DOT. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
safety beltSee seat belt. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
safety carA safety car or pace car limits the speed of competing cars on a racetrack in the case of an accident or caution periods caused by obstruction/s on the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sage lineA crease or curvature in the side of the body used to create visual drama. Sometimes the crease is functional and improves rigidity of the outer body. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)
Sail BoatViking Freight. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
salt shakerA snowplow. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
SaltySalt Lake City, Utah (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
sandbagTo gain a competitive advantage by deliberately underperforming at an event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sandbaggingNot participating in conversation but listening only, despite having the capability of speaking. This is not the same as listening in using a simple receiver, as the person doing this activity can transmit using the two-way radio, but chooses not to. It is done to monitor people for entertainment or for gathering information about the actions of others. Often, CBer's will sandbag to listen to others' responses to their previous input to a conversation, sometimes referred to a "reading the mail." (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
sandtrapAn area at the very end of a dragstrip to slow down and stop vehicles that have gone off the track, it is filled with, as the name implies, sand. The design of the sandtrap is intentional, and used as a safety device. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
satellite teamA second racing team either operated by or in partnership with a larger team but maintaining a separate identity. The team may share vehicles and technology with the main operation, or may develop the careers of upcoming drivers, such as Scuderia Toro Rosso. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Scale CityToledo, Ohio. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
scattershieldA bellhousing or external shield surrounding a bellhousing, and designed to contain metal fragments in the event of clutch and/or flywheel failure. The term also refers a metal shield intended to contain fragments in case of catastrophic transmission failure. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Schneider EggsOrange barrels filled with sand at construction sites to serve as a protective barrier for construction workers against moving traffic. The term is a reference to Schneider, a large trucking company known for its orange-painted trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
scissor doorsAlso known as Lamborghini doors, they are automobile doors that rotate vertically at a fixed hinge at the front of the door, rather than outward as with a conventional door. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
scoopAny inset or protusion that implies the intake of air. May be functional for cooling/ventilation or purely ornamental. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design) Inset or protusion that implies the intake of air. May be functional for cooling/ventilation or purely ornamental. Also Shaker scoop. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
scorching A century-old term for driving through a populated area at excessive speed.  Can be thought of the Brass Era version of the word "hoon."
scowling headlampsHeadlamps styled along a V-shape as viewed from the front, giving the impression of a scowl. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
scratch raceA type of race which competitors start on an equal term. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
scrubAlso known as the Bubba Scrub; a jump technique in motocross in which the rider transfer their weight to the bike sideways at the face of the jump for a lower trajectory which decreases time spent in the air. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
scrutineerA qualified official who examines racing vehicles pre-race for compliance with the rules of competition, usually in a scrutineering bay adjacent to the pit lane. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
scuffsTires which have been used limitedly, but are not worn out. Scuffs may be put on a car during a pit stop to improve handling. At times, brand new tires may be 'scuffed in' before a race by practicing in them for a lap or two. (See "Sticker tires") (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
scuttle The part of the body on a convertible or roadster where the windscreen is mounted. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
scuttle shakeScuttle shake (sometimes called cowl shake in the US) is the term used for the phenomenon experienced in many convertible or open top automobiles where, due to lower structural rigidity caused by the lack of a roof, the middle section of the chassis flexes, causing the bulkhead in front of the passenger compartment to move and vibrate when the vehicle is subject to uneven road surfaces. Passengers feel it as a noticeable vibration and shudder. (Wikipedia: Scuttle shake)
Seat Belt SyndromeA range of symptoms that might occur as a result of the seat belt doing its job in a crash or sudden braking. Children should be buckled in with a lap and shoulder belt, to provide upper body protection. If a child uses a lap belt only, he or she can suffer internal organ injuries and injuries to the lumbar spine (lower back). (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
seat beltThe webbing, anchor, and buckle system that restrains a passenger or car seat in a vehicle; also known as a safety belt. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
seat coverA attractive female passenger in a vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
secondary cellEdison Type: An electric storage or secondary cell the positive plates of which consist of nickel plated steel frames containing steel tubes filled with nickel hydrate, the negative plates consisting of similar frames containing pockets filled with iron oxide. The two sets of plates are immersed in a solution of caustic potash contained in a nickel plated steel jar. The method of use and the applications of this cell are similar to those of the lead cell. Synonyms: accumulator, storage cell. (A Dictionary of Automobile Terms (1913))
sectorA section of one complete lap of the circuit used for timing purposes. For the purposes of Formula One, each circuit is split into three sectors. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sedan deliveryNorth American term for a vehicle similar to a wagon but without side windows, similar to a panel truck but with two doors (one on each side), and one or two rear doors. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
sedanA car seating four or more with a fixed roof that is full-height up to the rear window. Known in British English as a saloon. Sedans can have 2 or 4-doors. This is the most common body style. In the U.S., this term has been used to denote a car with fixed window frames, as opposed to the hardtop style wherein the sash, if any, winds down with the glass. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
semi-automatic gearboxA motorsport application, created initially by Scuderia Ferrari for Formula One, in which the driver can change gears manually, but without having to manually activate the clutch. On open wheel race cars it is usually activated by paddles immediately behind the steering wheel, although touring cars and rally usually place the gear shifter as a gear stick in the more conventional position on the centre console, but occasionally is mounted as a stalk off the steering column, when activated, automatically engages the clutch and changes the gear and releases the clutch without any further input from the driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
semi-featureA qualifying race before the main event, where non-qualified cars compete for a predetermined number of spots in the main event. Some races have a C-main where the top finisher(s) qualify for the B-main. At those events, the main event is known as the "A-main". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
set of jointsA semi truck pulling two or more trailers in tandem. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
setupThe set of adjustments made to the vehicle in order to optimize its behavior. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Sewer CitySioux City, Iowa, so nicknamed because I-29 ran near infamous Sioux City Stockyards. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Sex LightsGot pulled over. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
shakedownThe first test of a new vehicle. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
shaker hoodA hood on a front-engine car where a section of the hood is connected to the top of the air cleaner rather than the rest of the hood, which is connected to the body.  The motion of the engine in its motor mounts makes this section of the hood "shake" when the engine is revved.
ShakeyLinerA Freightliner Trucks tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
shaking the treesThe person in the lead in a convoy watching out for troopers up ahead. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Shakotan Shakotan literally means “low car” and is used mainly for indicating extremely lowered streetcars with wings and big exhausts tips. (What is bosozoku?)
ShakytownLos Angeles, so nicknamed because of the earthquakes that occur there. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ShamborghiniA portmanteau of "sham" and "Lamborghini," meaning a fake Lamborghini.
shanty shakerMobile home hauler. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
shaved doorsShaved doors refers to a vehicle whose doors do not have handles on the outside of the vehicle in order to present in a smooth, clean, look. It was pioneered by legendary customiser Harry Westergard in California. The modification also increases security as there is no keyhole to pick or handle to grab. Often called autolocs, or autoloc doors, after a popular manufacturer of such doors. They are popular on hot rods, street rods, muscle cars, tuned cars (mostly Japanese), trucks, and mini trucks. It is also a traditional modification on many lead sleds, dating back to the 1940s. A solenoid is used to open the door. This solenoid can be triggered by button or remote. They can also be opened mechanically with a hidden cable release. (Wikipedia: Shaved doors)
shellA camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)
shellMolded plastic and/or metal structure of car seat or booster seat. Also called frame. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
shift kitA shift kit is a set of components for automobiles designed to improve how well the car shifts between gears. Kits are made for both automatic and manual transmissions. Shifts may be optimized for different goals. Some drivers want slow, smooth shifts for comfort, while others want quick shifts for performance or towing.For manual transmission equipped cars, it is a component that replaces the stock gear selector (shifter). A shift kit usually shortens the throws of selecting a gear (also known as a short throw shift), therefore allowing a driver to reduce the shift time and change gears more efficiently. An automatic transmission's main focus is smooth shifting between gears. To accomplish this it often goes into two gears at once while shifting up, which is known as a shift overlap. In these cars, it is a kit that can reduce or eliminate the shift overlap. It will also reduce wear because the transmission won't be trying to drive in two gears at once. (Wikipedia: Shift kit)
shift lightA shift light is a warning lamp fitted to vehicles in order to indicate to the driver that maximum RPM has almost been reached. Ideally a shift lamp will illuminate at the engine speed beyond that which delivers the maximum BHP such that the BHP before and after shifting is the same. Accelerating the engine beyond this point is not conducive to rapid acceleration. In use a shift light allows the driver to judge the exact point that a gear change should be carried out without having to glance down at the tachometer. This also increases safety for the driver by keeping his focus on the track at all times. Beginning in the early 1980s, many United States-market vehicles equipped with a manual transmission began to have shift lights as standard equipment; these would usually signal for an upshift at an engine speed that provided maximum fuel efficiency, lower than the ideal engine speed for maximum BHP. The reason for this was, for a time EPA fuel economy testing rules stipulated that shift lights would be followed on vehicles so equipped- thus, they were calibrated for optimum fuel mileage on the EPA test cycle. Some in the 1980s even had buzzers to alert the driver it was at a certain rpm. (Wikipedia: Shift light)
shooting brakeOnce a vehicle designed to carry hunters and sportsmen; now a station wagon or vehicle combining features of a station wagon and a coupe. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
shootoutA selection procedure in which the ten or 15 fastest qualifiers compete for grid positions in a single-lap effort without other vehicles on the track. While not specifically referenced, most NASCAR races will use this style of qualifying for all cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
short blockA short block is an engine sub-assembly comprising the portion of the cylinder block below the head gasket but above the oil pan. An in-block cam engine includes the camshaft, timing gear, and any balance shafts. Overhead cam engines don't include those parts. (Wikipedia: Short block)
Short NorthThe engineering nickname for the Oldsmobile LX5 V6, so named because it was a shortened version of the Northstar V8. (see also: Shortstar)
short shiftingA technique used, primarily in motorsport, to regain control of a car through a high speed corner. Involves the driver shifting up a gear earlier than usual. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
ShortstarA common nickname for the Oldsmobile LX5 V6, so named because it was a shortened version of the Northstar V8. (see also: Short North)
shot rodderMid-1960's slang term for a street racer, a variant of "hot rodder." (Hot Rods and Racing Cars #70 - September 1964)
shoulder lineThe line or "shoulder" formed by the meeting of top and side surfaces extending from hood/fender shoulder to boot-lid/quarter-panel shoulder. The strongest example of this feature can be found on more modern of Volvo Cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
shuntA crash. Usually side to side contact. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
shutdown areaIn drag racing, it is the extra 440 yards from the finish line, to the sand trap, used to safely shut down the car, and turn it off the track, so the next racers can begin their race. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
shutting down halfwaySame as 10-10 (no longer talking, but still listening). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Siamese boresAn engine block's cylinders if there are no water passages between them, the name coming from "Siamese twins."
side marker lightsIn the US, amber front and red rear side marker lamps and retroreflectors are required. The law initially required lights or retroreflectors on vehicles made after 1 January 1968. This was amended to require lights and retroreflectors on vehicles made after 1 January 1970. These side-facing devices make the vehicle's presence, position and direction of travel clearly visible from oblique angles. The lights are wired so as to illuminate whenever the vehicles' parking and taillamps are on, including when the headlamps are being used. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
side turn signalsIn most countries, cars must be equipped with side-mounted turn signal repeaters to make the turn indication visible laterally (i.e. to the sides of the vehicle) rather than just to the front and rear of the vehicle. These are permitted, but not required in the US. As an alternative in both the United States and Canada, the front amber side marker lights may be wired to flash with the turn signals, but this also is not mandatory. In recent years, many automakers have been incorporating side turn signal devices into the side view mirror housings, rather than mounting them on the vehicle's fenders. Some evidence suggests these mirror-mounted turn signals may be more effective than fender-mounted items. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
side zoomingWhen a lane is ending or closed and lanes of are merging well ahead of the lane end, side zooming is the act of driving in the empty lane to the point of the merge to jump ahead of traffic. (English slang)
sidebanderA CB station using SSB modulation. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
sidepodAerodynamic device to improve airflow between front and rear wheels on open wheel racing car which also covers ancillary equipment within car, most often water radiators which are air cooled by ram scoops at the open front of the sidepods. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sideshowA sideshow is an informal demonstration of automotive stunts now often held in vacant lots, and public intersections, most often in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area, United States. Sideshows first appeared in Oakland, California in the 1980s as informal social gatherings of youth. (Wikipedia)
Signal 7A dead carcass. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Signal Pirate(NASCAR) A driver who regularly races in the first tier NASCAR series, the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, who makes guest or semi-regular appearances racing in the second-tier NASCAR Xfinity Series. The term was named originally for then sponsor of the second-tier series Anheuser-Busch brewery. Claim Jumper was a reference to second-tier sponsor Nationwide Insurance (2008–14), and Signal Pirate references current second-tier sponsor Comcast Xfinity. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sillThe body section below the base of the door openings sometimes called the "rocker panels", or "rockers". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
sill lineImaginary line drawn following the bottom edge of the greenhouse glass. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
silver seederA combine harvester built by Gleaner Manufacturing Company. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
simconA type of roof where soft cloth is laid over a hard roof, but includes metal framing that simulates the framing of a soft convertible top. The name is a portmanteau of "simulated convertible."
single-leading-shoe drum brakeThe single-leading-shoe drum brake (SLS), a.k.a. "leading/trailing drum brake", is a basic type of drum brake design. The term "leading/trailing" means that only one shoe is "leading", moving into the rotation of the drum and thus exhibiting a self-servo (or self-applying) effect. The leading shoe is "dragged" into the friction surface of the drum and thus achieving greater braking force. The other shoe is "trailing", moving against the direction of rotation, is thrown away from the friction surface of the drum and is far less effective. An advantage of an SLS brake is that is equally effective whether the vehicle is travelling forwards or in reverse. When the vehicle is moving in reverse, the role of the leading and trailing shoes is switched. What would be the leading shoe when the vehicle is travelling forwards becomes the trailing shoe, and vice versa. (Wikipedia: Single-leading-shoe drum brake)
sipe a tireTo use a razor blade to cut a tire's thread causing the rubber to break off. Grooving or Cutting a tire means to use a tool to add additional grooves to a tire to adjust handling for a track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
six lineA line extending from the C-pillar down and around the rear wheel well. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
sixthlightAlso called Quarter Glass. Fixed glass located in between the side-door and boot. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
skateboardA flatbed truck or trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
skid plateMetal plates, most commonly titanium, fixed to the bottom of flat bottomed racing cars on the undertray facing the racing surface, put there to protect the undertray from ground strikes tearing through the undertray. Today less common as racing cars usually are mandated to have a ground clearance that is less critical to hitting the track. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
skillet faceA cab over engine truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
slabA custom older American sedan in a particular Houston custom car scene, most easily identifiable by "swangas" and trunk displays. Said to mean "slow, low, and bangin'."
slab sidedA large car with mostly flat sides, such as a 1964 Lincoln Continental or a 1980's Lincoln Town Car.
sledIn truck and tractor pulling, an implement pulled behind the machine which uses friction to stop the machine. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sleeper leaperProstitute, especially one that frequents truck stops. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
slickA phenomenon caused on short-circuit clay ovals that dry out too much. Clay circuits that do not maintain a certain amount of moisture as a race meeting progresses will start to wear the rubber off the soft specialised clay surface tyres of clay surface race car tyres much in the same way asphalt or concrete paved circuits do, giving the track surface a noticeably black shade. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)

A tyre with no tread pattern, maximising the amount of tyre rubber in contact with the racing surface. A specialist motor racing application as in wet weather conditions these tyres have little resistance to aquaplaning. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
slidejobEspecially in dirt oval racing, a passing car dives low into a corner, deliberately oversteers in front of the vehicle being passed in an attempt to slow their momentum. The vehicle being passed often attempts to pass back by steering low coming out of the corner down the following straightaway. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
slingshot passA pass using slipstreaming/drafting to gain speed. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
slingshotFront-engined dragster, named for the driving position behind the rear wheels (erroneously attributed to launch speed). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
slipstreamingA car following close behind another uses the slipstream created by the lead car to close the gap between them or pass it. Same as drafting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
slot magA magnesium wheel with five slotted holes drilled into an otherwise solid disk.
small family carSmall family/compact cars refer to the hatchbacks and shortest saloons and estate cars with similar size. They are approximately 4,250 mm (167 in) long in case of hatchbacks and 4,500 mm (177 in) in the case of saloons and estate cars. Compact cars have room for five adults and usually have engines between 1.4 and 2.2 litres, but some have engines of up to 2.5 litres. Some early "muscle" compacts had optional V8 engines of up to 6.6 liters. These are the most popular vehicles in most developed countries. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
Smart Air Bag SystemAlso known as advanced air bags. A smart air bag system detects when a child is present and automatically deactivates the air bag or enables it to deploy safely. Manufacturers who do not provide a qualifying "smart" system would be required to have new and more prominent air bag warning labels inside the vehicle. Manufacturers would also be permitted to install cutoff switches so parents can deactivate the passenger air bag when a child is seated in front of it. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
smokey in a plain brown wrapperA law officer in an unmarked police car. The term "plain white wrapper" is sometimes used, depending on the color of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
smokey in the bushA speed trap. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
smokey on four legsRoyal Canadian Mounted Police. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
smokey taking picturesA law officer monitoring traffic with a radar gun. Today, this can also refer to an automated speed camera. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
smokeyA law officer, particularly one from a state police or highway Patrol force. A "smokey report" is what CB users say when they have information on a law officer, such as location or current activities. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
smoking the tiresAlso called Lighting the hides, or Blowing the tires off. A term used mostly in drag racing when a loss of traction occurs, causing the rear tires to rise, and smoke profusely. This usually happens off the starting line. When this happens during a race, it usually results in a loss, unless the opponent also loses traction as well. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
smugglingDriving customers without notifying dispatch. A driver can get a free ride this way, without losing his place in line. Most drivers dishonest enough to smuggle will only do so if no other cabs are in sight, for fear of getting busted. Some do it anyway, and if another driver complains on the radio, they radio in, "I forgot to mention I got a flag going from A to B" or "Didn't I call that in?" (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)
snake in the grassPolice car radar usually hidden amongst tall cat tails. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
snowcoachA small motorcoach bus with four small tracks instead of wheels. Used in Yellowstone National Park for tourist transportation in wintertime.
snug harnessHarness straps that do not allow slack; the strap lies in a relatively straight line without sagging yet does not press into the child's shoulders creating an indentation. You should not be able to pinch the webbing vertically. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
soft topA convertible top which is made out of flexible materials like PVC or textile. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
soldier manTruck carrying Hummers, soldiers, even Tanks, other military equipment. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
SoundaktorSoundaktor (German for "sound actuator") is a vehicle audio system used to simulate engine noise in the cabin of some Volkswagen automobiles. It consists of a speaker mounted on the firewall between the engine and the cabin, which adds noise to the cabin in order to replicate the driving experience of older vehicles that had lower levels of sound insulation. (Wikipedia)
sow bellyA milk truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
spare carA car used by a driver if he has damaged his main car. It may or may not have the same setup as the primary car. Now banned in Formula One for cost-cutting reasons, though teams in many other major racing series have a spare car available at the track. At Indianapolis, it is traditionally called a "T Car" ("T" loosely short for "training") (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
spatsSide covers for wheel arches, hiding the wheel - usually rear only. Also called Fender skirts. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
special stageA section of road or track, closed off used for timed runs in rallying. A rally is made up of a number of special stages. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
speed trapA location where police frequently ticket drivers exceeding the speed limit, often chosen for locations where police cars can be concealed at the roadside and where people frequently exceed the speed limit.  Derisively used to refer to towns where they are viewed as being exceedingly strict on speed limits for the purpose of generating revenue for the town from drivers passing through.
spiffsSlang for "customer incentives, cash discounts, low-or no-interest loans and other inducements to buy new vehicles." Source: John Birchard 2004
spin turnA semi-doughnut which a driver use to turn themselves to a correct position on a tight space without the need of a reverse gear. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
spindleIn an automobile, the spindle is a part of the suspension system that carries the hub for the wheel and attaches to the upper and lower control arms. The spindle is referred to as an upright in UK-built vehicles and in areas dominated by cars designed for the UK, like Australia, New Zealand etc. (Wikipedia: Spindle (automobile))
splash and goA pit stop which involves refueling the car only, often less than a full tank. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
splitterAlso referred to as the front Spoiler, Front Air Dam, or Diffuser. Aerodynamic device placed on the nose of some touring cars and GTs to improve airflow around the nose of the car and sometimes create downforce for the front wheels to aid steering. It is prominent on NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow body style. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
spoilerA raised lip or wing which is used to 'spoil' unfavorable air movement across the body. Some designs are more functional than others. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)

Aerodynamic device attached to the trailing edge of a race car to increase its rear downforce. The difference between a spoiler and a wing is that wings are generally multi-element with air passing both above and below the aerodynamic surface, whereas a spoiler is flush fitted to the car's bodywork. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
sport utility vehicleSport utility vehicles are off-road vehicles with four-wheel drive and true off-road capability. They most often feature high ground clearance and an upright, boxy body design. Sport Utilities are typically defined by a body on frame construction which offers more off-road capability but reduced on-road ride comfort and handling compared to a cross-over or car based utility vehicle. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
sportbrakeA combination sports car/shooting brake, or a performance-oriented shooting brake style car.
sports carThe term "sports car" does not appear to have a clear definition. It is commonly used to describe vehicles which prioritise acceleration and handling; however, some people claim it is also defined as a vehicle with two seats. A Sports car (sportscar or sport car) is a small, usually two-seat, two-door automobile designed for spirited performance and nimble handling. Sports cars may be spartan or luxurious but high maneuverability and minimum weight are requisite. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
sports saloonThese are high-performance versions of saloons. Sometimes originally homologated for production based motorsports (touring cars or rally cars) and like regular saloons, seats four or five people. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
sports sedanThese are high-performance versions of saloons. Sometimes originally homologated for production based motorsports (touring cars or rally cars) and like regular saloons, seats four or five people. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
spot lightsPolice cars, emergency vehicles, and those competing in road rallies are sometimes equipped with an auxiliary lamp, sometimes called an alley light, in a swivel-mounted housing attached to one or both a-pillars, directable by a handle protruding through the pillar into the vehicle. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
spotterA person, positioned high above the circuit, who communicates what going on the track to the driver. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
SpringFAILdSpringfield, Illinois. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
spy in the skyA police aircraft. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
spyderSimilar to a roadster but originally with less weather protection. Nowadays it simply means a convertible with two seater only. The name comes from the old carriages with two seats and no roof, whose small central cabin and big wheels at the corners are reminiscent of a spider. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
staggerThe difference in circumference between the left and right tires. It is used to make a racing car turn easier on oval tracks. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
staggered wheel fitmentThe front and rear wheels are different widths. On sporty rear wheel drive cars, the rear tires are usually wider than the front. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
standard tree(drag racing) Timing lights which flash in sequence five tenths of a second between each yellow light before turning green. Traditional form, before introduction of pro tree. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
standing startA starting method where the race machines are stationary on the grid. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Star CityRoanoke, Virginia, named after the Roanoke Star. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
start and parkA team or driver who starts a race and only runs a small number of laps to avoid using up resources (tires, parts, pit crew, etc...). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
starting shutterA damper inserted in the air intake of a carburetor which is normally kept open, but which, when closed, causes the carburetor to deliver a very rich mixture in order to facilitate starting the motor. Syn: Air damper, primary air shut-off. Also an adjustable valve in the main air intake of the carburetor used in regulating the quality of the fuel mixture. (A Dictionary of Automobile Terms (1913))
static caravan A trailer-based housing unit that is set in one place, the British English version of the term "mobile home."
station hack An early type of vehicle named after a type of wagon (hack) that was designed to carry people and their luggage to a train station. Would later evolve into the term "station wagon."
station wagon American term for an estate car, a car where a substantial portion of the rear of the car is enclosed as part of the passenger cabin. The name evolved from "station hack."

A station wagon (also known as an estate or estate car) is an automobile with a body style variant of a sedan/saloon with its roof extended rearward over a shared passenger/cargo volume with access at the back via a third or fifth door (the liftgate or tailgate), instead of a trunk lid. The body style transforms a standard three-box design into a two-box design—to include an A, B, and C-pillar, as well as a D-pillar. Station wagons can flexibly reconfigure their interior volume via fold-down rear seats to prioritize either passenger or cargo volume. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
steak on the grillTo hit a cow. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
steering columnThe automotive steering column is a device intended primarily for connecting the steering wheel to the steering mechanism or transferring the driver's input torque from the steering wheel. A steering column may also perform the following secondary functions: energy dissipation management in the event of a frontal collision; provide mounting for: the multi-function switch, column lock, column wiring, column shroud(s), transmission gear selector, gauges or other instruments as well as the electro motor and gear units found in EPAS and SbW systems; offer (height and/or length) adjustment to suit driver preference(Wikipedia: Steering column)
steering wheel holderAn inexperienced or poor driver. The Term is meant to be a demoted version of a truck driver because the person is "not worthy" of being called a truck driver. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
stewardThe adjudicator or referee at a race meeting who interprets incidents and decides whether penalties or fines should be issued. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Sticker PatchPhoenix, Arizona. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
sticker tiresBrand new tires put on a race car. Nicknamed "sticker tires" because the manufacturer's labels are still visible. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Stink CityLas Cruces, New Mexico earned this name because a sewage treatment plant was placed right next to Interstate 10 and near several truck stops. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
stintThe period a driver is at the wheel in an event involving more than one driver in the vehicle. Sometimes refers to the period of driving between pit stops. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
stop lampsRed steady-burning rear lights, brighter than the rear position lamps, are activated when the driver applies the vehicle's brakes. These are called stop lamps in some countries and brake lights in others. They are required to be fitted in multiples of two, symmetrically at the left and right edges of the rear of every vehicle. International UN regulations specify a range of acceptable intensity for a stop lamp of 60 to 185 candela. In North America where the UN regulations are not recognised, the acceptable range for a single-compartment stop lamp is 80 to 300 candela. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
stop-go penaltyA penalty assessed to a driver for an on-track infraction that requires them to enter their pit box (or in some cases a special penalty pit box) and come to a complete stop before resuming. No work is allowed to be done on the car during the penalty, even if it is being served in the driver's own pit box. Doing work on the car would negate the serving of the penalty, and the penalty would have to be re-served the next time around. In some cases, the car is held in the box for a specified number of seconds before being allowed to resume. Sometimes called a Stop and go penalty. Since the early/mid-1990s, this penalty has seen less use, and is instead typically replaced by the Drive-through penalty. The drive-through penalty requires a driver to enter and drive through the pit road (below the pit road speed limit), before returning to the track. When pit lane speed limits became standard in motorsport in the early 1990s, the drive-through penalty was deemed sufficient, while stop-go penalties (when coupled with the now slow pit speed limits) were now considered excessive. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
storage cellEdison Type: An electric storage or secondary cell the positive plates of which consist of nickel plated steel frames containing steel tubes filled with nickel hydrate, the negative plates consisting of similar frames containing pockets filled with iron oxide. The two sets of plates are immersed in a solution of caustic potash contained in a nickel plated steel jar. The method of use and the applications of this cell are similar to those of the lead cell. Synonyms: accumulator, secondary cell. (A Dictionary of Automobile Terms (1913))
strakeCrease in the sheet metal intended as a "speed line" styling feature. Exemplified in the doors of the Ferrari Testarossa. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
stretching your hoodLying to dispatch about your location. Examples include saying you're closer to an incoming call than you actually are. Another is saying you're clear well in advance of clearing, which lets you get in line (virtual line maintained by dispatch) earlier. Also, drivers will claim to be entering one of our pickup zones when they're still miles away -- same reason, we get in line upon returning to our pickup zones. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)
stripeThe start/finish line. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
struck the tires(drag racing) Loss of traction, causing them to smoke. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
stub axleA stub axle is one of the two front axles that carries a wheel in a rear wheel drive vehicle. The axle is capable of limited angular movement about the kingpin for steering the vehicle. The stub axle consists of wheel bearings which support the wheel hub. The stub axle is named so because it resembles the shape of a stub, like a truncated end of an axle, short in shape and blunt. There are four following method those are 1. Elliot strub axle 2. Reversed elliot 3. Lemoine 4. Lemoine inverted (Wikipedia: Stub axle)
Stump TownPortland, Oregon. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
the stupid taxThe cost of towing or a technician's diagnostic fee for something obvious, i.e. a car out of gas taken to the mechanic for not starting.
subcompact carThis class is known as supermini in the UK, subcompact in North America. Superminis have three, four or five doors, and even as an estate shape. They are designed to seat four passengers comfortably. Current supermini hatchbacks are approximately 3900 mm long, while saloons and estate cars are around 4200 mm long. Currently (2013) sedan variants are generally not available in Europe and are marketed at a lower price than hatchback models in North America. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
subframeA subframe is a structural component of a vehicle, such as an automobile or an aircraft, that uses a discrete, separate structure within a larger body-on-frame or unit body to carry certain components, such as the engine, drivetrain, or suspension. The subframe is bolted and/or welded to the vehicle. When bolted, it is sometimes equipped with rubber bushings or springs to dampen vibration. The principal purposes of using a subframe are, to spread high chassis loads over a wide area of relatively thin sheet metal of a monocoque body shell, and to isolate vibration and harshness from the rest of the body. For example, in an automobile with its powertrain contained in a subframe, forces generated by the engine and transmission can be damped enough that they will not disturb passengers. As a natural development from a car with a full chassis, separate front and rear subframes are used in modern vehicles to reduce the overall weight and cost. In addition a subframe yields benefits to production in that subassemblies can be made which can be introduced to the main bodyshell when required on an automated line. (Wikipedia: Subframe)
success ballastA method used to level performance between competitors by adding weight to cars the win races or are successful. Somestimes referred to as Lead trophy as the usage of lead bars is most popular in applying the additional weight. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
suds and mudBeer and coffee (with cream/milk in it), served at some truck stops and restaurants. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
suicide doorRear-hinged type, opening from the front of the car. If accidentally opened while driving at a high speed, doors would be blown backward. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
suicide jockeyA truck carrying explosives. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
sun visorA sun visor is a component of an automobile located on the interior just above the windshield (also known as the windscreen). They are designed with a hinged flap that is adjustable to help shade the eyes of drivers and passengers from the glare of sunlight. (Wikipedia: Sun visor)
Sunoco SpecialNew York State Police patrol car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
sunroofAn automotive sunroof is a fixed or operable (venting or sliding) opening in an automobile roof which allows light and/or fresh air to enter the passenger compartment. Sunroofs are either manually operated or motor driven, and are available in many shapes, sizes and styles. (Wikipedia: Sunroof)
Super BowlChannel 6 (27.025 MHz). A popular channel for skip shooters using high powered amplifiers. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Super ChickensYellow Freight System trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
super slabA multi-lane highway. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
super specialTimed special stage in a rally on a purpose-built track, often in a stadium. Usually two cars will set off at the same time in separate lanes, and at the halfway point of the stage they will swap lanes, usually due to a crossover involving a bridge. A similar format is used in the Race of Champions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Super TrooperEither a marked or unmarked state trooper vehicle sporting additional antenna on the trunk or sides of the vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Super TruckerIt was Jimmy Hoffa during the early sixties who gave a speech in which he coined 'super truckers' to mean the extra ordinary strength it required to be an over the road driver. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
supercarSupercar is a term generally used for ultra-high-end exotic cars, whose performance is superior to that of its contemporaries. The proper application of the term is subjective and disputed, especially among enthusiasts. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
superminiThis class is known as supermini in the UK, subcompact in North America. Superminis have three, four or five doors, and even as an estate shape. They are designed to seat four passengers comfortably. Current supermini hatchbacks are approximately 3900 mm long, while saloons and estate cars are around 4200 mm long. Currently (2013) sedan variants are generally not available in Europe and are marketed at a lower price than hatchback models in North America. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
superpoleA selection procedure in which the ten or 15 fastest qualifiers compete for grid positions in a single-lap effort without other vehicles on the track. While not specifically referenced, most NASCAR races will use this style of qualifying for all cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
support raceA race(s) that takes place before and/or after the main event race. It may also be held during a qualifying day, and is often used to provide a fuller weekend of activities. It is normally a race from a lower or "ladder" series, is usually shorter in duration, and in some cases might feature some moonlighting drivers from the main event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
support rallyWhen a rally driver retires on any day, except the last, they can continue the next day incurring penalties for the stages they did not drive, including the one they retired on. Currently, in World Rally Championship, a driver will be given the time of the fastest driver of their class, plus a five-minute-penalty for each missed stage. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
suspension linkIn automotive suspensions, a suspension link, control link or link is a suspension member, that attaches at only two points. One point being the body or frame of the vehicle and the other point attaching to the knuckle, upright, axle or another link. The link pivots on either a bushing or a ball joint at each attachment point. A link differs from a control arm because it can only control one of the degrees of freedom by itself. In the attached photo of a 5-link live axle suspension, the different types of links can be seen. These links work in tandem with the coil springs, dampers, and sway bar to control all six degrees of freedom of the axle. The upper links (orange) and the lower links (yellow) work in tandem to control the pitch, yaw and the fore and aft movement (surge). The panhard rod (green) controls the left and right movement (sway). While the springs and dampers (not shown) control the up and down movement (heave) and the roll is controlled by the sway bar (also not shown). It takes a minimum of two links per wheel in a MacPherson strut-style suspension and a minimum of three links per wheel in a multi-link suspension. (Wikipedia: Suspension link)
swage lineCrease or curvature in the side of the body used to create visual distinction. Sometimes the crease is functional and improves rigidity of the outer body (interchangeable with character line). (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
The SwampMontréal, Québec (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
swangasSpoke wheels with a center cap and spokes that stick outward as much as 24" from the rim. Also known as "elbows."
Swedish KissA negative flick out to a flat surface which frames trim sections or venting. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
swindle sheetA trucker's log book. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
swingerA passenger on a racing motorcycle sidecar who athletically moves from one side of the sidecar to the other, altering a sidecar's weight distribution to assist in cornering speed and in some corners to prevent the sidecar from tipping over. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Swiss cheese wagonA school activity bus. So called because they are usually painted white. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
switchable retractorA retractor that can be switched from emergency locking retractor to an automatic locking retractor for use when installing car seats. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
T
T-boneA collision in which the front of a car crashes into the side of another car, forming a "T" shape. This is one of the more dangerous types of crash due to the relative vulnerability of side impacts where there is much less deformable structure on the side of a car to protect the driver. Also, to crash into another car in such a fashion; the victim is "T-boned". (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
T-carAlternative term for spare/backup car (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
t-topA derivative of the Targa top, called a T-bar roof, this fixed-roof design has two removable panels and retains a central narrow roof section along the front to back axis of the car (e.g. Toyota MR2 Mark I.) (Wikipedia: Car classification)
T-TownTulsa, Oklahoma. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
T.K.Thermo King; refrigerated unit on the front of a trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
T2 Me TooA Peterbilt 387 tractor. Noted for its near clonelike resemblance to the Kenworth T-2000. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
tachometerA tachometer (revolution-counter, tach, rev-counter, RPM gauge) is an instrument measuring the rotation speed of a shaft or disk, as in a motor or other machine. The device usually displays the revolutions per minute (RPM) on a calibrated analogue dial, but digital displays are increasingly common. The word comes from Greek ταχος (tachos "speed") and metron ("measure"). Essentially the words tachometer and speedometer have identical meaning: a device that measures speed. It is by arbitrary convention that in the automotive world one is used for engine and the other for vehicle speed. In formal engineering nomenclature, more precise terms are used to distinguish the two. (Wikipedia: Tachometer)
tail lightsConspicuity for the rear of a vehicle is provided by rear position lamps (also called rear position lamps or tail lamps, taillights, or tail lights). These are required to produce only red light and to be wired such that they are lit whenever the front position lamps are lit, including when the headlamps are on. Rear position lamps may be combined with the vehicle's stop lamps or separate from them. In combined-function installations, the lamps produce brighter red light for the stop lamp function and dimmer red light for the rear position lamp function. Regulations worldwide stipulate minimum intensity ratios between the bright (stop) and dim (rear position) modes, so that a vehicle displaying rear position lamps will not be mistakenly interpreted as showing stop lamps, and vice versa. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
take rateGenerally speaking the percentage of customers who sign up for a particular item or extra. In the automobile industry, it refers to the percent of buyers who purchase a particular option, package, or service.
takeyari Very tall exhaust pipes that exit from under the back bumper of a car, turn upward, and end well over the height of the car.
tandem fodderSomeone or something (e.g. an animal) of trivial importance obstructing the right-of-way on a roadway to the detriment of their own safety (derived from the term, "Cannon fodder"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
tandemsThe rear wheels on a trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
tank-slapperWhen the front wheel of a motorcycle oscillates rapidly, causing the handlebars to slap against the fuel tank. It is increasingly being used to refer to a vehicle that loses traction at the rear, regains traction and loses it again, causing the rear to weave side to side independently of the front of the car. This is more often referred to as fish-tailing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Tansō
単走
Japanese term for individual drift passes where drivers drive whilst being observed in front of judges in an attempt to vy for the top spot. Translation: solo run. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
tarapoppA "caruggy" or tarapopp is a specialized off-road vehicle. Caruggy is a portmanteau of the words car and buggy. Some people think that the caruggy nomenclature is derived from using a car frame as the basis for the vehicle, whereas a "buggy" would have started from the chassis of a Volkswagen Bug. Actually the "caruggy" is the "unlimited class", full tube chassis brainchild of Tim Lawrence (TLR Performance Fabrication) of El Cajon, Ca. With the help of Travis Rojas (the co driver). It is a morph between a "Trophy car" and a "Race Buggy". It is simply put, a giant front engined race buggy, like a car. Race buggies were historically rear engine. Caruggy are built for off-road racing. They are built at specialty shops that know and understand the rules of the racing classes. Popular racing series that include these vehicles are the Baja 1000, Baja 500, The Mint 400, the 1400-mile Vegas to Reno, etc. Caruggies are built from scratch, not heavily modified street vehicles that have been altered to the point that they barely resemble their original form. A caruggy generally has several defining features: (Wikipedia: Truggy)
team ordersThe practice of one driver allowing another from the same team or manufacturer to gain a higher finish at the direction of the team management. Often employed to prevent the risk of an accident resulting in damage to both of a team's cars. The practice was briefly forbidden in Formula One as a consequence of the 2002 Austrian Grand Prix controversy. U.S.-based series (NASCAR, IndyCar, etc.) rarely if ever have used team orders, and the practice is widely frowned upon due to sportsmanship issues and fan backlash. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
tear-offThin plastic sheets that drivers stack up over their visor or windshield for visibility. Drivers (or pit crews) tear one off after it becomes dirty. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
technicianTerm used to refer to a person who has successfully completed the standardized Child Passenger Safety Technician certification course. The certification courses use a NHTSA training curriculum, and Safe Kids Worldwide serves as the certifying body. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
telematic control unitA telematic control unit (TCU) in the automobile industry refers to the embedded system on board a vehicle that controls tracking of the vehicle. A TCU consists of: a global positioning system (GPS) unit, which keeps track of the latitude and longitude values of the vehicle; an external interface for mobile communication (GSM, GPRS, Wi-Fi, WiMax, or LTE), which provides the tracked values to a centralized geographical information system (GIS) database server; an electronic processing unit; a microcontroller, in some versions; a microprocessor or field programmable gate array (FPGA), which processes the information and acts on the interface between the GPS; a mobile communication unit; and some amount of memory for saving GPS values in case of mobile-free zones or to intelligently store information about the vehicle's sensor data. (Wikipedia: Telematic control unit)
templateA device used by sanctioning body officials to check the body shape and height of racing vehicles. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
ten-tenthsRefers to driving a car to its absolute potential. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Terrible FlowNotoriously unreliable GM V6 Toro Flow diesel engine used in some GM trucks built in the 1960s and 70s. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
teslemmingsA derogatory term for followers of Tesla and Elon Musk.
tetherComprised of a tether strap and tether hook that 'anchors' the top of the car seat to the tether anchor in the vehicle. Keeps restraint from tipping forward on impact and can provide extra protection. The tether is located on the top rear of convertible, combination, and all-in-one car seats used forward-facing. Most rear-facing-only infant car seats do not use this equipment for installation. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
tether anchorHardware used to connect the tether at a designated anchor point in the vehicle. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
Texas CadillacA Chevrolet Suburban. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Texas donutA style of building with a ring of apartments surrounding a parking garage.
The Big EasyNew Orleans, Louisiana (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The Big RoadAn interstate, particularly Interstate-80. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The Big StinkLas Cruces, New Mexico (Due to its waste water treatment plant being to close to I-10). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The BluffPoplar Bluff, Missouri. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The Canadian TurnpikeName give to Interstate-81 because of its heavy Canadian truck traffic. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The CurveI-90 & I-39 interchange; I-90 turn north at Rockford, IL. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The DimeInterstate Highway 10. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The DogGreyhound bus. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The Magic CityBirmingham, Alabama. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The PegWinnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
The SwampMontréal, Québec. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Thermos BottleDriver pulling a chemical trailer. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
thirteen-letter shit spreaderA Navistar International truck (formerly International Harvester). The terms originated because the International Harvester Company was primarily known for their farm machinery. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
three on the treeA three-speed manual gearshift where the shift lever is located on the steering column (the "tree"). Similar in phrasing to "four on the floor."
three-box formA categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the Three-box form, there is a "box" delineating a separate volume from the a-pillar forward, a second box comprising the passenger volume, and third box comprising the trunk area — e.g., a Sedan. The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "3-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
throttle body spacerA throttle body spacer is usually a 1-inch (25 mm) thick piece of metal that is bolted to the outlet of the throttle body upstream of air flow into the manifold. By changing the airflow, this after-market add-on does claim to be a performance enhancing accessory that can increase an engine's horse power, torque and fuel economy. It functions by swirling or directing the air flow to maximize air volume to the manifold. There is much debate about the veracity of the manufacturers claims for these devices. The general consensus is that it works well on some engine configurations, and not at all, or adversely on others. (Wikipedia: Throttle body spacer)
throttlemanIn offshore powerboat racing, the boat's second occupant who work alongside the driver, whose role is to steer the boat. The throttleman's position is to adjust the trim tab whilst observing water conditions and extract as much speed out of the boat by controlling the hand-throttle during a race whilst it hops over tides after tides to prevent the propellers from spinning wildly whilst the boat is airborne, which causes the engine to overrev, leading to engine damage. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
throw a beltLosing the drive belt connecting the engine's crankshaft to the supercharger, most commonly associated with drag racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
ThunderchickenA derogatory nickname for a Ford Thunderbird. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ThunderturdA derogatory nickname for a Ford Thunderbird.
tifosi Tifosi is a group of supporters that make up a tifo, especially in sports. Tifosi is used for a mixed gender or an all-male group; masculine singular is tifoso, feminine singular tifosa, feminine plural tifose. It has become common to use the word Tifosi to refer to the supporters of Scuderia Ferrari in Formula One. Italian motor racing fans are well known for their love of Ferrari, though they have also been staunch supporters of other Italian cars such as Maserati, Lancia and Alfa Romeo. (Wikipedia: Tifosi)
Tijuana TaxiA marked police car. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
time attackA competition which involve cars running around the circuit in lieu of a qualifying lap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
timed raceInstead of running a predetermined number of laps, a race runs for a predetermined amount of time (i.e. 24 Hours of Le Mans). This is common in endurance racing, although series such as Formula 1 have a limit on how long a race can be run (Usually two hours), which means that a race may be ended after the time limit expires but before the predetermined number of laps is run. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
timeslip(drag racing) E.T. slip. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
tin Lizzie A nickname for a Ford Model T.
tire load sensitivityTire load sensitivity describes the behaviour of tires under load. Conventional pneumatic tires do not behave as classical friction theory would suggest. The load sensitivity of most real tires in their typical operating range is such that the coefficient of friction decreases as the vertical load, Fz, increases. The maximum lateral force that can be developed does increase as the vertical load increases, but at a diminishing rate. (Wikipedia: Tire load sensitivity)
tire shakeA term in drag racing, when the engine is putting out more horsepower than the drive axle can handle, causing the rear tires to shake violently. This results in a loss of speed, and can also result in loss of steering, and occasionally, lead to on track accidents. Refer to in other disciplines sometimes as axle tramp. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
title loanA type of secured loan where borrowers can use their vehicle title as collateral. Borrowers who get title loans must allow a lender to place a lien on their car title, and temporarily surrender the hard copy of their vehicle title, in exchange for a loan amount. When the loan is repaid, the lien is removed and the car title is returned to its owner. If the borrower defaults on their payments then the lender is liable to repossess the vehicle and sell it to repay the borrowers’ outstanding debt. (Wikipedia)
title washingThe fraudulent process through which a vehicle’s title is corruptly altered to conceal information that should normally be contained on the title, such as a previous salvaged title or a financial lienholder. (FBI)
tōge A Japanese word literally meaning "pass." It refers to a mountain pass or any of the narrow, winding roads that can be found in and around the mountains of Japan and other geographically similar areas, like the legendary Nordschleife in Germany. (Tōge)
TommyA request for a location of an information station, such as rest area information center or truck stop information desk. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ton topRoad car-derived vehicles with a roof, mainly in touring car racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
tonneauA tonneau is an area of a car or truck open at the top. It can be either a passenger or cargo space. A tonneau was originally an open rear passenger compartment, rounded like a barrel, on an automobile and, by extension, a body style incorporating such a compartment. The word is French, meaning 'cask' or barrel. (Wikipedia)

A term used to describe the back seat of an automobile, from the fact that it looked so much like barrels. Which the word "tonneau" means in French. Grandma killed this style because she stepped into mud puddles. Hot Rods and Racing Cars #2 - January 1952
tonneau coverA tonneau cover in current automotive terminology is a hard or soft cover that spans the back of a pickup truck in order to protect the contents of the payload or improve aerodynamics. Tonneau covers come in a wide variety of styles that fold, retract or tilt open, and can generally be locked to secure the contents of the pickup truck bed. Tonneau covers are also used in the boating industry to cover and protect any open areas of a boat. Many of these covers are made from a waterproofed canvas material and are secured to the edges of the area to be protected with snaps. The older, original tonneau covers were used to protect unoccupied passenger seats in a convertible or roadster, or the cargo bed in a pickup truck. Hard tonneau covers open by a hinging or folding mechanism while segmented or soft covers open by rolling up. (Wikipedia)
TontoToronto, Ontario, Canada. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
top end(drag racing) Finish line of strip; high part of engine's rev band. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
topperA camper shell (also canopy, and sometimes topper, cap, bed cap, box cap, or simply shell) is a small housing or rigid canopy used as a pickup truck or coupe utility accessory. The housing is usually made of fiberglass or aluminum, but sometimes wood, and is mounted atop the pickup truck's rear bed. It usually covers the entire bed of the pickup truck, and is large enough to be used for camping purposes. Even though use for camping may have been its initial purpose, it now seems most often to be used for utility and storage purposes - particularly the protection of cargo from the elements and theft. Some camper shells are so large that they can overlap the top of the truck's cab, and some called soft-tops are made of canvas like convertibles. (Wikipedia: Camper shell)
town carEssentially the inverse of the landaulet, a historical body style in which the front seats were open and the rear compartment closed, normally with a removable top to cover the front chauffeur's compartment. In Europe the style is also known as Sedanca de Ville, often shortened to Sedanca or de Ville. Note that the modern Lincoln Town Car derives its name, but nothing else, from this style. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
Town ClownA law officer with a city or township police force, seldom encountered on interstate highways. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
town clownThe unlucky guy who gets one short, local ride after another. This is really frustrating, especially when other drivers are getting great rides all around you. I have a general rule: four locals in a row and I'm done for the day. (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)
Toy BoxToyota vehicle. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
toy tonneauA smaller version of the regular tonneau, generally the same size as the front seats, and lower than the regular touring seat. (Hot Rods and Racing Cars #2 - January 1952 )
track recordA term referring either to the best performance of any athlete on a certain track, or to the history of a certain racer's past performance. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
trackThe distance across the car between the base of the left and right wheels. (Like wheelbase, but side to side.) (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
trackless tramA bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.
trackless trolleyA bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.
traction bars(drag racing) Rear struts fixed to rear axle to keep rear axle from twisting, which causes wheel hop and loss of traction; also called slapper bars. In FWD cars, commonly import drag racing, used to keep front wheels in the ground. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
traction controlThis regulates the power supplied to the wheels of a vehicle to prevent wheelspin. It is banned in many forms of motor racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
trailer jockeySee "Yard Goat". Short single-axle truck used for pulling semi-trailers in shipping yards. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
trailer light converterA Trailer light converter is an electrical component used for connecting the wiring of a trailer onto a towing vehicle. It is sometimes necessary because of the legal requirement for trailer lighting. Furthermore, from a technical perspective, it is used for wiring the two vehicles together to power and synchronize their lighting systems. A trailer light converter assists in adapting the differences in voltage and the number of wires. Most basic trailers in Canada and USA usually have only one light (with one wire) on each side that functions as both a turn signal and a brake light (though sometimes there is a separate yellow and red light for signal and brake lighting). The brake signal from the towing vehicle usually needs to be received by the converter and then sent to both the left and right trailer lights. (Wikipedia: Trailer light converter)
trainPolice backup. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
transmission solenoidA transmission solenoid is an electro-hydraulic valve that controls fluid flow into and throughout an automatic transmission. Solenoids can be normally open or normally closed. They operate via a voltage or current supplied by the transmission computer or controller. Transmission solenoids are usually installed in a transmission valve body, transmission control unit or transmission control module. (Wikipedia: Transmission solenoid)
trap speed(drag racing) Speed as measured by the speed trap near the finish line, indicative of the maximum speed reached on a pass. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
traps(drag racing) The 20 meter (66 ft) timing lights at top end of race track to measure speed & E.T. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Trash CanTranscontinental truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
travel limiterA device, often a chain, attached to the suspension to limit wheel travel. This prevents the tire from remaining on the ground when a car is raised on a jack for a tire change. Typically used on the left rear of a dirt track race car. Also known as a droop limiter or droop chain.
treeThe tower of lights used to start a drag race.

The plastic molding frame on which plastic model parts are distributed.
Tri PowerTri power was the name for an arrangement of three two-barrel carburetors installed on large performance V8s offered by the Pontiac Division of General Motors in the late 1950s and 1960s. Three individual Rochester 2G carburetors were arranged inline on the intake manifold, the center one operating normally and the outer two acting as secondaries, or "dumpers", for full throttle performance. Tri Power often included a hood bulge to accommodate the carburetor set-up and identifying badging on the vehicle's exterior. (Wikipedia: Tri power)
tricycle motorYoung child (Also, "Crumb-Cruncher", "Curtain Climber", "Rugrat"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
trikeA motorcycle with three wheels, usually one front and two rear wheels.
trim packageA trim package (sometimes called an appearance package) is an automotive package composed by a set of cosmetic (mostly non-functional) embellishments to a vehicle. In some cases the trim package may include a specific model or ending name. Such packages may be characterized by the use of a famous fashion designer's name, including examples as the Pierre Cardin AMC Javelin, the Oleg Cassini AMC Matador, or the Lincoln Continental in Givenchy or Bill Blass versions. (Wikipedia: Trim package)
Triple NickelCummins 555 V8 diesel truck engine. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
triptych Commonly the word means a three-panel artwork, often hinged in some way into three pieces.  Also refers to an automobile route book consisting of strips of paper maps (2"x9" a common size) bound together.  The AAA trademark term is "TripTik."
trolley busA bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.
trolley coachA bus powered by overhead electrical wires. Much as a streetcar is limited to its tracks, the trolley bus is limited to the path of the wires, but cheaper to build and maintain than a streetcar because it runs on a bus chassis and does not need tracks.
Truck Stop TommyA pimp of sorts who specializes in getting truckers illegal services and/or drugs. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
truckA typically large vehicle built using frame-on-rail construction consisting of a cab and a separate bed for cargo. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)
truckie Slang for a truck driver.
truckstop hookupA short term date of sorts. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
truggyA "caruggy" or tarapopp is a specialized off-road vehicle. Caruggy is a portmanteau of the words car and buggy. Some people think that the caruggy nomenclature is derived from using a car frame as the basis for the vehicle, whereas a "buggy" would have started from the chassis of a Volkswagen Bug. Actually the "caruggy" is the "unlimited class", full tube chassis brainchild of Tim Lawrence (TLR Performance Fabrication) of El Cajon, Ca. With the help of Travis Rojas (the co driver). It is a morph between a "Trophy car" and a "Race Buggy". It is simply put, a giant front engined race buggy, like a car. Race buggies were historically rear engine. Caruggy are built for off-road racing. They are built at specialty shops that know and understand the rules of the racing classes. Popular racing series that include these vehicles are the Baja 1000, Baja 500, The Mint 400, the 1400-mile Vegas to Reno, etc. Caruggies are built from scratch, not heavily modified street vehicles that have been altered to the point that they barely resemble their original form. A caruggy generally has several defining features: (Wikipedia: Truggy)
trunkCompartment for storage of cargo which is separate from the cab. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)
trunk displaysA common element in a particular Houston custom car scene where trunks are highly decorated, most notably with messages in neon or glass on the inner trunk lid.
Tsuisō
追走
Japanese term for tandem passes where two cars are paired off against each other over two passes within a heat, with each driver taking a turn to lead. Translation: chase-attack. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
tube fenderReplacement fenders found on off road vehicles designed as part of body armor for off road vehicles. Used to protect the thin sheet metal bodies from damage while off-roading. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
tumblehomeGenerally refers to the way the sides of a car rounds inward toward the roof, specifically of the greenhouse above the beltline. This term is borrowed from nautical description of naval vessels. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
turismo Spanish term for a sedan. Literally means tourism, used mostly in Latin American countries and Spain. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
turn signalsTurn signals—formally called "direction indicators" or "directional signals", and informally known as "directionals", "blinkers", "indicators" or "flashers"—are blinking lamps mounted near the left and right front and rear corners of a vehicle, and sometimes on the sides or on the side mirrors of a vehicle, activated by the driver on one side of the vehicle at a time to advertise intent to turn or change lanes towards that side. (Wikipedia: Automotive Lighting)
turn underThe shape of the rocker panel as it curves inward at the lower edge. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
TwentyA short form of 10-20. Denotes location, as in identifying one's location ("My 20 is on Main Street and First"), asking the receiver what their current location is ("What's your 20?"), or inquiring about the location of a third person ("Ok, people, I need a 20 on Little Timmy and fast"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
twister trackerSomeone who is chasing tornadoes, other storms. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Two Story FalconFord H series cab-over-engine trucks built during the 1960s. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
two-box formA categorization based on overall form design using rough rectangle volumes. In the case of the Two-box form, there is usually a "box" representing a separate volume from the a-pillar forward and second box making up the rest. e.g., Station Wagon, Shooting-brake, Scion xB (2006) The equivalent French term is volume, which you will sometimes see used by the British: "2-volume form". (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
two-speedHi-Low rear axle used in some trucks. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
U
U-Haul lesbianU-Haul lesbian or U-Haul syndrome is a stereotype of lesbian relationships, referring to the joke that lesbians tend to move in together on the second date. It suggests an extreme inclination toward monogamy or committed relationships. It can be considered both complimentary and pejorative, depending on context. (Wikipedia)
UFO CentralArea 51, other areas known for UFO activity. (Truckers call the area near Rachel, Nevada this, as well as other areas known for UFO activity, such as Roswell, New Mexico, and Phoenix, Arizona). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
ultracompact carIn 2012, Japan's Transport and Tourism Ministry allowed local government to use ultracompact cars as transport for residents and tourists in their limiting areas. The size of ultracompact cars will be less than minicars, but have engine greater than 50cc displacement and able to transport 1 or 2 persons. Ultracompact cars cannot use minicars standard, because of strict safety standards for minicars. The regulation about running capacity and safety performance of ultracompact cars will be published in early autumn. Today, there are cars smaller than ultracompact cars, called category-1 motorized vehicles which it has 50cc displacement or less and only one seat for the driver. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
underglowLight glow from under the chassis of a vehicle. Formerly referred to as neon for the type of lighting used, underglow came about as LED lights became more common than neon lights.
understeerCornering behaviour where the front wheels do not follow the steered course but instead push out toward the outside of the turn. Known as push in NASCAR and other stock car racing. Opposite of oversteer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
undertrayFlat or stepped flat surface on the bottom of open wheel and sports prototype racing cars. Theory has varied along with aerodynamic developments and regulations, from the sidepod tunnels of ground effect to the flat undertrays of the 1980s in various attempts to use aerodynamics to suck the cars closer to the bitumen, minimising the air underneath the car that could slow its progress. Today most such categories feature a stepped undertray with sidepods siting higher in the air than the centre of the car, usually mandated by series organisers in an attempt to limit vehicle performance. Also refers to flat surfaces extending behind splitters in sedan and GT based racing cars. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
United Package SmashersUnited Parcel Service truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
United Pot SmokersUnited Parcel Service truck. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
unleadedGasoline without tetraethyl lead additive. Technically the default formula as lead had to be added to gasoline that did not naturally contain lead, the lead was added to gasoline for a half century and was so familiar that it made "unleaded gasoline" a new product in the late 1960's/early 1970's.
uteA term used originally in Australia and New Zealand to describe usually two-wheel-drive, traditionally passenger vehicles with a cargo tray in the rear integrated with the passenger body; as opposed to a pickup whose cargo tray is not integrated with the passenger body. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
V
vacuum delay valveA vacuum delay valve is a valve with a small orifice, which delays a vacuum signal. These are commonly used in automobiles to alter the behavior of vacuum switches, vacuum motors, and other vacuum devices. The engine in a common automobile produces almost 20 inches of mercury (68 kPa) of vacuum, and this pressure differential has been utilized for everything from automatic locks and windshield wipers to operating emissions control items. (Wikipedia: Vacuum delay valve)
vacuum switchPrior to effective engine control unit computers, engine vacuum was used for many functions in an automobile. Vacuum switches were employed to regulate this flow. For instance a dual port vacuum switch located in a port on the intake manifold monitored the coolant temperature in the coolant crossover. It received vacuum (port E on the switch) from the carburetor. The vacuum flowed through the switch to a vacuum solenoid (such as a heat riser, used to restrict exhaust allowing the engine to heat up faster). When the coolant heated to operating temperature the vacuum switch closed off the port (port S on the vacuum switch) turning off the vacuum to the heat riser. The result is to clear the exhaust restriction. The switch monitored the temperature and when conditions were right it performed its designed function. (Wikipedia: Vacuum switch)
vagonetaBolivian Spanish Colloquial term for a station wagon (with or without SUV capabilities). (Wikipedia: Car classification)
valve bounceValve bounce is a condition where the valve does not stay seated, due to the combined effects of the valve's inertia and resonance of metallic valve springs that reduce the closing force, and allow the valve to re-open partially. (Wikipedia: valve float)
valve floatValve float is an adverse condition which can occur at high engine speeds when the poppet valves in an internal combustion engine valvetrain do not properly follow the closure phase of the cam lobe profile. This reduces engine efficiency and performance and potentially increases engine emissions. There is also a significant risk of severe engine damage due to valve spring damage and/or pistons contacting the valves. (Wikipedia: valve float)
valve loftValve loft is intentionally using a controlled valve float to increase lift and duration of the valve open cycle. In some motorsports there are rules that limit camshaft lift; therefore, provoking this type of exploitation. Properly optimizing the system avoids undue stresses to the camshaft lobes and tappets. (Wikipedia: valve float)
valve shimA valve shim is a disc of hardened metal of precisely calibrated height, used to adjust the clearance (US: lash) between the back side of the cam-lobe and the valve on which it operates, where the cam-lobe operates directly on the valve without an intermediate rocker arm. The shim sits atop a shim bucket which itself sits atop the valve-stem, and moves up and down within a machined bore. While hydraulically self-adjusting valves are sometimes preferred, because they require no adjustment, they do not work well in engines capable of high RPMs. In those, shims are most often used. As an example, most motorcycle engines capable of 8000RPM+ use shim-adjustable valves. (Wikipedia: Valve shim)
valvetrainThe mechanisms and parts which control the operation of the valves. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)
vanIn some countries, the term "van" can refer to a small panel van based on a passenger car design (often the estate model / station wagon); it also refers to light trucks, which themselves are sometimes based on SUVs or MPVs. (But note that those retaining seats and windows, while being larger and more utilitarian than MPVs, may be called "minibuses".) The term is also used in the term "camper van" (or just "camper") — equivalent to a North American recreational vehicle (RV). In the United States, the term "van" refers to vehicles that, like European minibuses, are even larger than large MPVs and are rarely seen being driven for domestic purposes — except for "conversion vans". These possess extremely large interior space and are often more intended for hauling cargo than people. Most vans use body-on-frame construction and are thus suitable for extensive modification and coachwork, known as conversion. Conversion vans are often quite luxurious, boasting comfortable seats, soft rides, built-in support for electronics such as television sets, and other amenities. The more elaborate conversion vans straddle the line between cars and recreational vehicles. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
vanifestoA portmanteau of "van" and "manifesto," referring to a van covered in political slogans or posters.
VantuckyVancouver, Washington. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
vent spewSmall rubber "hairs" on new tires formed from rubber in the air vent holes of the tire mold.
Vehicle Identification NumberA set of about 17 codes, combining letters and numbers, assigned to a vehicle at the factory and inscribed on a small metal label attached to the dashboard and visible through the windshield. The vehicle identification number (VIN) is a unique identifier for the vehicle and therefore is often found on insurance cards, vehicle registrations, vehicle titles, safety or emission certificates, insurance policies, and bills of sale. The coded information in the VIN describes characteristics of the vehicle such as engine size and weight. U.S. Department of Transportation, 2012
VentiportsThe official Buick name for the fender holes more commonly known as "portholes." Buick started the trend in the 1950's, and it has been known by the common generic name as it has spread to other marques via fake stick-on portholes sold at auto parts stores.
Victory LaneAlso 'Winner's Circle,' because of early motorsport's roots at horse racing tracks, the American term for the place where the winner of a race goes to celebrate victory after winning an event. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
victory lapA lap, after the conclusion of the race, where the winning racer drives at reduced speed to celebrate his or her victory. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
VIP style VIP style is more or less a crossover between Shakotan and gang cars: extremely lowered luxury vehicles (lots of bling!) are filled up with as much novelties as possible and ride on big rims. Sometimes very close to Bosozoku style. (What is bosozoku?)
W
wagon deliveryNorth American term (mainly U.S. and Canada). Similar to a sedan delivery, with four doors. (Wikipedia: Car classification)
walliesA slower car, usually found at the rear of the grid. It is sometimes a derogatory term. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
WallyIn the NHRA, The Wally is the nickname of the trophy that is earned by the winner of an event, the nickname refers to the founder of the NHRA, Wally Parks. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
warm air intakeA warm air intake or WAI is a system to decrease the amount of the air going into a car for the purpose of increasing the fuel economy of the internal-combustion engine. This term may also be used to describe a short ram air intake, a totally different intake modification. All warm air intakes operate on the principle of decreasing the amount of oxygen available for combustion with fuel. Warm air from inside the engine bay is used opposed to air taken from the generally more restrictive stock intake. Warmer air is less dense, and thus contains less oxygen to burn fuel in. The car's ECU compensates by opening the throttle wider to admit more air. This, in turn, decreases the resistance the engine must overcome to suck air in. The net effect is for the engine to intake the same amount of oxygen (and thus burn the same amount of fuel, producing the same power) but with less pumping losses, allowing for a gain in fuel economy, at the expense of top-end power. Opposite principle of a cold air intake (CAI) which significantly differs by collecting air from a colder source outside the engine. In the extreme, a warm air intake can eliminate the need for a conventional throttle and thus eliminate throttle losses. (Wikipedia: Warm air intake)
wastegateDevice attached to turbochargers used to limit the additional horsepower they produce. Usually a mechanical device, activated when the pressure within the turbocharger reaches a certain point, opening a valve, thus reducing boost pressure. Used primarily for safety (speed reduction of the racing cars) or cost (reducing stress on both turbo and engine, lengthening the life of the parts prior to failure or rebuild). Not to be confused with a Blow-Off Valve. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
watering the tiresTo urinate using the quadruple tractor or trailer tires. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
wear the shiny offA term used, mostly within drag racing, when a brand new car either hits the wall, or, in the Pro Stock class, when a new car flips over into its top and continues down the track for a considerable length, peeling the paint, or more common in recent years, vinyl wrap, off. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
webbingThe fabric part of the seat belt that crosses the body and holds a person or a car seat in place. (Safercar.gov Car Seat Glossary of Terms)
wedgeShape of the car as seen in the side profile. May be positive, negative or neutral. If the front is lower than the rear, then it is wedge-positive. If the rear is lower it is wedge-negative. If the car appears level from front to rear, then it is wedge neutral. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
weight shiftingA technique used to reduce understeer. This involves the driver decelerating through a corner to shift the weight of the car from the back to the front, increasing grip of the front tyres and decreasing understeer. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Weiner WagonA Werner Transport tractor. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
wet tyreA racing tyre with deep grooves designed to displace standing water, allowing the tyre to obtain grip in conditions where dry weather tyres (slicks) would aquaplane. Monsoon wet has become a term used for extremely wet conditions. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheel archThe visible opening in the side of a car allowing access to the wheel. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
wheel arch gapThe space between the tire and the wheel well. Currently there is a trend towards smaller wheel arch gaps. Sometimes referred to as Dead Cat Space due to the fact that, in winter, many domestic cats try to seek shelter in wheel wells of recently parked cars in an attempt to stay warm. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
wheel bangingWhen the wheels of two different race cars slightly collide during an overtaking manoeuvre. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheel cylinderA wheel cylinder is a component in a drum brake system. It is located in each wheel and is usually positioned at the top of the wheel, above the shoes. Its function is to exert force onto the shoes so as to bring them into contact with the drum and stop the vehicle with friction. The wheel cylinders are usually connected to the shoes with small bird-beak shaped rods. It is very similar to a slave cylinder and functions in much the same way, internally consisting of only a simple plunger. On older vehicles these may begin to leak and hinder the performance of the brakes, but are normally inexpensive and relatively easy to replace. The wheel cylinder consists of a cylinder that has two pistons, one on each side. Each piston has a rubber seal and a shaft that connects the piston with a brake shoe. When brake pressure is applied, the pistons are forced out pushing the shoes into contact with the drum. Some designs use two single piston wheel cylinders, one at the top of the drum and one at the bottom, each connected to one brake shoe. Wheel cylinders must be rebuilt or replaced if they show signs of leaking. Wheel cylinders used to be made of cast iron. However, they were more prone to rusting and aluminium is now the preferred material. (Wikipedia: Wheel cylinder)
wheel hopViolent shaking of the car as the tires lose and regain traction in quick succession. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheel shroudAlso known as aero cover or rim blanking. A wheel cover designed to distribute airflow to the brakes, thereby generate downforce. Saw common use in the Group C era, Indycar up to 1993 when banned and in F1 between 2006-2009. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheel wellThe enclosure or space for the wheel. Also known as a bucket. (Wiktionary: Glossary of Automotive Design)
wheelbaseThe distance front to back measured from where the front and rear wheels meet the ground. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
wheelieIn a rear wheel drive vehicle, when the front wheel(s) rise up in the air under acceleration. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheelie barsRear struts fixed to rear axle, which protrude out to rear of car to help prevent car's front from raising too high or flipping over on launch in drag racing. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheelspinWhen the rear tyres (or front tyres in the case of a front wheel drive vehicle) break traction with the racing surface under acceleration, spinning the wheels faster than they move across the surface. On higher traction surfaces like bitumen the tyre will begin to shred and melt from the friction, producing white smoke. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheelstandA type of wheelie. In drag racing, an extreme case, with front wheels very near vertical. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wheelstanderIn drag racing, an exhibition car designed to complete a pass in a wheelstand (wheels near vertical). (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
whipA motocross technique in which the rider pitch their bike sideways and reposition themselves for the landing whilst airborne. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
white metalA way to collectively refer to trucks, vans, step vans, and other work vehicles that are usually painted white.
wickerbillAnother name for a Gurney flap. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
widowmakerA semi truck pulling two or more trailers in tandem. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
wiggle wagonA semi truck pulling two or more trailers in tandem. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
wild campingCamping with a recreational vehicle parked without connections to water, electricity, or sewer.
wildcattingPicking up a flag in a city or zone you're not licensed for. San Diego and certain suburbs have banded together to offer a single pickup license, but the airport has its own license, as do some suburbs. A cabbie can only pick up where he's licensed; he can drop off anywhere except Mexico (for insurance reasons). (Taxi lingo and a few tricks of the trade)
Willy WeaverA driver who is weaving, due to lack of sleep or excess of alcohol. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
window deflectorA window deflector is mounted above the doors of some automobiles, to protect the inside of the car from rain or other precipitation in case of slightly opened windows. Additionally, it may help to prevent precipitation entering the interior in case of an opened door, e.g. dropping from the roof or directly from the air. Deflectors are also fitted to sunroofs to deviate wind. It is also known as a "monsoonshield" or a "rain visor" (in countries without monsoon). The primary purpose of window deflectors is to prevent dust, snow, rain, other precipitation or excessive wind from entering to the cabin. Also, window deflectors direct air flows over the vehicle, and thus, reduce the wind noise when driving on moderate speeds. Window deflectors can be installed directly in the window channel or attached to the vehicle's body in the sunroof or side window area using 3M automotive-grade adhesive tape. Window deflectors are common accessory in the automotive aftermarket. Being vehicle-specific, they are normally designed to fit individual car, truck or SUV models. (Wikipedia: Window deflector)
window washerRain. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
windshield trimMolding of any material between the windshield glazing and the exterior roof surface, including material that covers a part of either the windshield glazing or exterior roof surface. (Wikipedia: Glossary of automotive design)
wingAerodynamic device on many racing cars. The principle is the same as an aircraft wing except in motor racing applications the wing is inverted to create downforce instead of lift, pressing the car onto the road surface to increase traction. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wired to the treeA drag racing term for a racer that consistently beats his opponent off the starting line. Also called Chopping down the Christmas Tree. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
wishboneSuspension control arm with three points, shaped roughly like a chicken wishbone. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
with a customerOfficer with a car pulled over. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
workin'A Weigh Station or Rest Area that is pulling trucks in for weighing or inspection. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
works teamA motor racing team supported by a vehicle manufacturer, usually run in-house at the manufacturer's premises. A works driver is a driver who drives for the works team. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
Y
Yanky styleDuring the 70s and 80s in Osaka area the street fashion became to wear colourful Aloha shirts and pants and this caused the wearers being called Yankees. Most of the “bad boys” were wearing the Aloha fashion and hence the Bosozoku became equivalent to Yankee style. The writing of this style is officially with double ii, so Yankii. (What is bosozoku?)
yard dog
yard goat
yard jockey
Short single-axle truck used for pulling semi-trailers in shipping yards. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
yard lineMile marker. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
yardstickMile marker post. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
yellow chequerA term derived when the final lap(s) in a race is completed during a full course yellow while the field is under the control of the Safety Car. In this instance the yellow and chequered flags are waved together and the race is declared finished with the order the same as when the full course yellow began. Unpopular with spectators because of the anti-climactic nature of the finish, the possibility does make some senior race officials hesitate to use it late in the race, call a red flag to allow for further cleanup of the circuit to ensure a final restart (which is often used anyway for severe debris incidents, especially with carbon fibre), or direct to slow the safety car in order that the hazard may be cleared in time for a competitive race finish. INDYCAR has a Yellow chequer rule, and NASCAR allows it (1) if a race is shortened because of curfew or darkness, (2) if the race is already on its final lap when the yellow must be waved, or (3) if there is a yellow implemented after the leader crosses the "overtime line" (usually located on the backstretch) during a valid green-white-checkered finish once the race has restarted. In Formula One, when there is a yellow chequer, the safety car will not lead the leader to the finish line, unlike INDYCAR and NASCAR. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
yellow limousineA slang term for a long yellow school bus.
You Ass EhThe U.S.A. (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
Z
zero carUsed in rallying. Prior to the rally cars running over a special stage several official vehicles run through the course to check for safety, conditions of the road, to see if spectators or animals may be a hazard or for obstructions. Sometimes there are a triple zero (000) and double zero (00) as well as the zero. Zero cars travel the course immediately ahead of the competitors and are usually rally cars themselves. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
zero lightAlso known as "cutting a zero," and a "zero R.T." Used in drag racing when someone leaves the starting line at the exact moment when the light turns green (.000). Very difficult to achieve, due to the quick flashing of the lights on a Pro tree. (Wikipedia: Glossary of motorsport terms)
zipperPainted dashed line dividing lanes ("He is hogging the zipper"). (Wikipedia: List of CB Slang)
zipper mergeWhen traffic is merging from two lanes into one, a zipper merge is merging in an orderly fashion where one car from each lane merges in turns similar to how the teeth of a zipper come together.


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