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Alfa Romeo Giulietta


Giulietta
Vehicle Model

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Wikipedia: Alfa Romeo Giulietta
Wikipedia: Alfa Romeo Giulietta (750/101)
Wikipedia: Alfa Romeo Giulietta (116)
Wikipedia: Alfa Romeo Giulietta (940)

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Article Index
A small car produced by Alfa Romeo. Three different versions of the car have been produced:
Tipo 750/101, 1954-1965
Tipo 116, 1977-1985
Tipo 940, 2010-present

History

The following section is an excerpt from Wikipedia's Alfa Romeo Giulietta (750/101) page on 14 December 2016, text available via the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta (series 750 and 101) was a family of automobiles made by Italian car manufacturer Alfa Romeo from 1954 to 1965 which included a 2+2 coupé, 4-door saloon, estate, spider, Sprint, and Sprint Speciale. The 2+2 was Alfa Romeo's first successful foray into the 1.3-litre class. From 1954 to 1965 a total of 177,690 Giuliettas were made, the great majority in saloon, Berlina , Sprint coupé or Spider body styles, but also as Sprint Speciale and Sprint Zagato coupés, and Promiscua estate.

The Guilietta series was succeeded by the Giulia in 1962.

The first Giulietta to be introduced was the Giulietta Sprint 2+2 coupé at the 1954 Turin Motor Show. Designed by Franco Scaglione at Bertone, it was produced at the coachbuilder's Grugliasco plant near Turin.

A year later, at the Turin Motor Show in April 1955, the Sprint was joined by the 4-door saloon Berlina. In mid 1955, the open two-seat Giulietta Spider, featuring convertible bodywork by Pininfarina. In 1957 more powerful Berlina version, called Giulietta T.I. (Turismo Internazionale) was presented with minor cosmetic changes to the hood, the dial lights and rear lamps.

Carrozzeria Colli also made the Giulietta station wagon variant called Giulietta Promiscua. Ninety-one examples of this version were built. Carrozzeria Boneschi also made a few station wagon examples called Weekendina.

The following section is an excerpt from Wikipedia's Alfa Romeo Giulietta (116) page on 14 December 2016, text available via the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta (Tipo 116, Italian for Type 116) is a small executive saloon car manufactured by Italian car maker Alfa Romeo from 1977 to 1985. The car was introduced in November 1977 and while it took its name from the original Giulietta of 1954 to 1965, it was a new design based on the Alfa Romeo Alfetta chassis (including its rear mounted transaxle). The Giulietta went through two facelifts, the first in 1981 and the second one in 1983. All Giuliettas used 5-speed manual transmissions.

While it was a conventional three-box saloon/sedan body style, a defining point of difference was at the rear, where there was a short boot, and a small aerodynamic spoiler, integrated into the body. The Giulietta was only offered in saloon form, but there were several estate/station wagon conversions made. First out was Moretti, whose conversion appeared in the first half of 1978.

First series

The Giulietta was launched in November 1977. Two models were available: Giulietta 1.3, with an oversquare 95 PS (70 kW) 1357 cc engine, and Giulietta 1.6, with a 109 PS (80 kW) 1570 cc engine, both Alfa Romeo Twin Cam inline-fours fed by two twin-choke carburettors.

In April 1979, just under two years later, Giulietta 1.8 with a 122 PS (90 kW) 1,779 cc engine was added, and in May of the following year the Giulietta Super with a 2-litre engine (1,962 cc, 130 PS or 96 kW) appeared.

Second series

In summer of 1981, the Giulietta received a minor facelift, externally and internally, while the engines remained the same. The car got plastic protection around the lower body, while interior modifications included a new steering wheel and new seats. The instrument panel and the centre armrest were also modified.

The Autodelta-produced Giulietta 2.0 Turbo Autodelta (175 PS) was introduced at the 1982 Paris motor show. This special version had a turbocharged 1,962 cc engine. The production Giulietta Turbodelta version had 170 PS (125 kW; 168 hp) and a KKK turbocharger coupled with two double-barrel Weber carburettors. All turbo versions were black with red interior; only 361 were produced. In the same year, the Giulietta 2.0 Ti and turbodiesel (VM) 1995 cc version with 82 PS (60 kW; 81 hp) were also introduced, going on sale in early 1983.

In 1982, Alfetta and Giulietta turbodiesels achieved seven world speed records over 5/10/25/50 thousand kilometres and 5/10/25 thousand miles at Nardò (Lecce). While one of the quickest diesels in its category at the time, the Giulietta was rather costly and suffered from a very forward weight distribution (56.9 per cent over the front wheels).

Third series

In late 1983, the "84" Giulietta (Series 3) was presented, with minor differences in appearance, bumpers were redesigned and the dashboard was significantly re-designed, the instruments changed slightly and the rear seat in some versions changed its form. Mechanically it was basically the same, with minor modifications to the brake booster and inlet manifold on some versions.

The largest market for the Giulietta was South Africa, where a very successful TV advertising campaign by Alfa Romeo produced good sales between 1981 and 1984. Central to this campaign was emphasis of the Giulietta's new 'aerodynamic' line, which was carried over to the 75, and then the 33. The Giulietta was the 'last hurrah' for Alfa in South Africa before the appearance of the 164 and 156 models in the 1990s

In 1985, after around 380,000 Giuliettas had been built, it was replaced by the Alfa Romeo 75, which used much of the Alfetta/Giulietta underpinnings.

The following section is an excerpt from Wikipedia's Alfa Romeo Giulietta (940) page on 14 December 2016, text available via the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The Alfa Romeo Giulietta (Type 940) is a small family car produced by the Italian automaker Alfa Romeo. Giulietta production started towards the end of 2009 and was introduced at the March 2010 Geneva Motor Show. In a viability plan forwarded to the US Government in February 2009, Chrysler (a partner of Alfa Romeo parent company Fiat) reported that the 147 replacement would come to market as the Milano and that it could be built in the USA. However, as of early 2010 Fiat was instead planning to concentrate on bringing larger models to the US, such as the Giulia. The Giulietta came in second place in the 2011 European Car of the Year awards. Between 2010 and 2012 around 200,000 Giuliettas were built.

The 2010 Giulietta is available only as a 5-door hatchback. The Giulietta got its Italian dealer presentation on 22 and 23 May 2010. The Giulietta advertising campaign is made with Hollywood actress Uma Thurman. The end of the advert features the car's mottos - 'I am Giulietta, and I am such stuff as dreams are made on' and 'Without heart, we would be mere machines'.

The platform used is Fiat Group’s Compact also called as "C-Evo" during the planning stage. Practically this is an all new platform. Fiat Group used around 100 million euros to re-engineer the C-platform, previously used for the Fiat Stilo, Fiat Bravo and Lancia Delta, into C-Evo, it has a longer wheelbase, shorter overhangs and an advanced new type of MacPherson strut front suspension and multi-link rear suspension. Depending on the market and trim level, 16, 17, or 18 inch wheels are available. Available tire sizes are 205/55 R16, 225/45 R17, and 225/40 R18. The wheels use a 5-hole pattern with a 110 mm bolt circle. The length of the Giulietta is around 4.3 metres (14 ft), which is similar to the Alfa Romeo 156. Only a five-door body is available for sale.


Photographs

Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Sprint
Photo courtesy of Image*After
View photo of Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint - 1,467KB
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Sprint
Photo courtesy of Image*After
View photo of Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint - 1,401KB
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Sprint
Photo courtesy of Image*After
View photo of Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint - 1,489KB
Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Sprint
Photo courtesy of Image*After
View photo of Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint - 1,390KB


Article Index

DateArticleAuthor/Source
21 October 2013Alfa Romeo Giulietta first drive review Matt Hubbard, Speedmonkey


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