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Kubica To Start in France


Open Wheel Racing Topics:  Robert Kubica, French Grand Prix

Kubica To Start in France

Anthony Fontanelle
June 30, 2007

BMW Sauber’s second driver has been cleared by doctors and the FIA to start at the French Grand Prix. The Polish-born Formula One driver was involved in a high-speed accident at the Canadian Grand Prix and was sidelined for the United States Grand Prix.

At the Canadian Grand Prix held at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve, Kubica hit the rear end of Jarno Trulli’s car. The high sped collision forced Kubica off the tracks and into the grass where his car hit a bump. The bump sent the front end of Kubica’s car off the road and was lifted off the ground. Due to that, the Pole did not have the chance to steer or activate the brakes.

Unable to steer the car, Kubica’s car smashed into the concrete wall. Due to the impact of the collision, Kubica’s car barrel-rolled across the tracks and what was left of the car stopped against another wall on its side. Initial reports after the crash said that Kubica may have broken his leg in the crash. Fortunately though, less than 24 hours after the accident, Kubica was released from the hospital and even drove by himself in his BMW X5.

The findings after the crash reported that Kubica only suffered a minor concussion and a sprained ankle. After gathering crash data from Kubica’s car, or what was left of it, the FIA found out that Kubica survived a 75-G impact. The Pole missed the United States Grand Prix and Sebastian Vettel took his place during that mentioned race.

The next race though will see Kubica suited up again to race just a couple of weeks after his high speed crash which would have disintegrated the car’s BMW vent visor if it had one.

“I am 100% cent fit and now looking forward to the French Grand Prix,” said Kubica. “I am glad I only missed out on the race in Indianapolis. Although I wasn't allowed to test (at Silverstone last week), I've used the time to focus intensively on preparing for the next race. Now I can't wait to get back into the car.”

This year would have been the first complete season for Kubica. He took over driving duties for BMW Sauber at the Hungarian Grand Prix last year. Interestingly, the Polish took over the spot of Canadian Jacques Villeneuve. Another interesting fact is that Kubica crashed in the track named after Jacques’ father who died while driving his Formula One car.

During Kubica’s absence, BMW Sauber’s third driver Sebastian Vettel became the youngest driver to score a point in a Grand Prix. The German replacement for Kubica finished eighth at the United States Grand Prix and scored a point for BMW Sauber. The youngster though is not expected to be back to racing in a Grand Prix as Kubica has already been cleared to start.

Kubica is currently seventh in the drivers’ championship standing with twelve points to his credit. His highest finish so far is fourth place which came at the Spanish Grand Prix. His other points came from his sixth place finish at the Bahrain Grand Prix and a fifth place finish at the Monaco Grand Prix. He is behind Lewis Hamilton, Fernando Alonso, Felipe Massa, Kimi Raikkonen, Nick Heidfeld, and Giancarlo Fisichella in the standings.

His team is currently third in the constructors’ championship standing with 39 points.

Source:  Amazines.com

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